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December 07, 1988 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-12-07

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I

Fleetwood: The
diner time forgot

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, December 7, 1988 - Page 3
Duderstadt,
Bush iscuss

BY MARK MOSHER
The battle going on at the other
end of the Fleetwood Diner's lunch
counter has reached epic proportions.
It seems that each time the deter-
mined patron lunges at it with knife
and fork, the leathery looking object
sitting next to his cole slaw begins
to dodge and parry, knocking his
french fries onto the greasy counter-
top. A couple of aging hippies sit-
ting at a nearby table stop singing
along with "Alice's Restaurant" to
giggle.
"Bring me something sharper,
Gloria," he says, with a fierce glint
in his eye. Armed with a steak knife,
he tears into the gristly piece of
meat. "Delicious."
Through nearly 40 years, three
incarnations and countless owners,
the little diner on the corner of Ash-
ley and Liberty has provided a home
for the eccentric of mind and strong
of stomach.
The diner itself is not much to
look at. A small custard-colored
rectangle on cinder-blocks with a
crooked awning, it looks like a
halfway house for wayward alu-
minum siding. But artifacts like the
huge Coca-Cola sign on the roof add
an unmistakable ambiance and recall
a simpler time - how many of us
can remember when Coke was "the
pause that refreshes?"
Inside, a half-dozen of the rotating
candy-apple red stools of yester-year
adorn a short counter. Patrons should
beware of the counter-top, though,
as it is ancient yellow formica that
will never fail to camouflage the last
customer's spilled mustard. Not sur-
prisingly, the better dressed clientele
seem to sit at the four remaining
worn wooden tables.
"Waitperson" Gloria Vitagliano,
whose faded black concert T-shirt and
gruff sense of humor recall a time
when people still rode big American
motorcycles, serves the evening
customers. "The Fleetwood was in-

stitutionalized in 1947, but most of
the employees have yet to be," she
cackles, leading one to believe it
might not be such a bad idea.
With a sinister wisper, she points
over her shoulder to the burly cook
with a dragon tattoo on one large
upper arm and a grim reaper on the.
other. "That's George, killer cook
from hell."
George, as if to confirm this, n>
dribbles some hamburger grease onto'
the grill, causing the flames to dance
and filling the diner with greasy
brimstone.
Laughing to herself, she points
one customer to the menu on the far
wall. "What can I do you out of?"
she asks. Cheeseburger seems to be
the most common answer. Legend
has it that the New York Times once
listed the Fleetwood's burgers
among the 10 best in the nation.4
The Fleetwood caters to the chil-
dren of the 60s who never developed
a taste for the macrobiotic fare that-
many of their cohorts still embrace.
"We don't serve anything
healthy, she tells a customer who
asks for a diet soda, "only things
that are bad for you." X'.
But Gloria says the Fleetwood's
clientele is the menu's biggest at-
traction. Customers run the gamut
from workers in the mornings, to
professors and students in the after- ROBIN LOZNAK/Doily
noons, to the prostitutes and street Ann Arbor resident and Community High School student Ona
Y1.f..I..a an~ ra LA A- a ..-. ra_-- -" r r

higher
BY STEVE KNOPPER
University President James Dud-
erstadt said U.S. President-elect
George Bush was "very committed"
to higher education after Bush met
with 10 university presidents from
around the country Mondayrin
Washington.
In an interview yesterday, Duder-
stadt said Bush sought recommenda-
tions for appointing his key educa-
tion officials, advice for improving
the national science adviser position,
and feedback on federal financial aid
programs.
Ten past and present college offi-
cials - including the heads of Yale,
California, and Cornell Universities
and the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology - met with Bush, Vice
President-elect Dan Quayle, and cur-
rent Secretary of Education Lauro
Cazazos in an informal forum to
discuss general issues in higher edu-
cation.
"We didn't go in reciting a litany
of all the issues, or prescriptions or
solutions," University of Nebraska
President Ronald Roskens, who at-
tended the meeting, said yesterday.
"Rather, we asked the question,
'How can we help one another ad-
dress these real issues?"'
Duderstadt said the group ad-
dressed five topics: providing better
access to colleges for all citizens, the
national scientific agenda, the rela-
tionship between K-12 and higher
education, attracting more minorities
to work and study at colleges, and
expanding the university's interna-
tional role.
"There was an expression of con-

ed.
'There was an expression
of concern on both sides..
about the rising costs of
higher education. The
sense was that we both
had areas to work on.'
University President
James Duderstadt
cern on both sides about the rising
costs of higher education," Duder-
stadt said. "The sense was that weF
both had areas to work on." The
government must improve its regu-
latory and tax policies and the col-
leges need to solve internal bud-
getary problems, he said.
Duderstadt, who had never met
Bush before Monday, said he was
impressed by the future president's
"sincerity and very clear understand-
ing of the issues of higher education.
He was very at ease in chatting with
academics."
Bush has pledged to be the
"education president," and Monday's
meeting was an attempt to reach out
to national higher education experts
for input. Kristin Taylor, a
spokesperson for the vice president,
said Bush will continue to hold
similar meetings during his tenure as
president.
Duderstadt said the meeting,
initiated by Yale President Benno
Schmidt, was a "first step in a
longer dialogue."

people wno used to come in when
there was an all-night shift.
Terry Richards, a 10-year veteran
of Fleetwood fare and one of the
diner's many self-styled historians,
will pass by other restaurants and
come out of his way for the Fleet-
wood. He once drove all night from
Syracuse when he was homesick for
Ann Arbor.
"When I walked in the door ev-
eryone said, 'Hi Terry,' as if I had
walked in from across the street." he
says. "The people bring me back -
I can always get into a good conver-

Taurienen relaxes in the Fleetwood Diner during her lunchI

break.
sation."
"I used to spend a lot of time
travelling on business and I realized
how you can tell a lot about a town
from diner conversations. In diners
out East, it's usually blue-collar
types talking about how bad work is
going and who is sleeping with
who's wife; in Ann Arbor we talk
about every possible socio-political
issue..."
Gloria mentions that the Fleet-

wood was often host to celebrities.
"Martha Reeves and the Vandellas
came in here after a show once," she
says.
What did they have? "Cheese-
burgers, of course," says Gloria.
"Speaking of cheeseburgers, I see
you were able to keep yours down,"
she commends a patron sitting at the
counter. "We usually provide air sick
bags 'cause we're such a classy
place."

PLO
Continued from Page 1
Israeli officials alleging the recent
PLO proclamation to be unclear and
ambiguous, Abu-Lughod said the
PLO's resolution is instead "very
clear and explicit."
"The Palestine Liberation Orga-

nization, on the basis of UN security
resolutions 242 and 338,calls for an
international peace conference where
all parties involved come to the
peace table on an equal footing," the
resolution reads.
The PNC resolution passed in
Algiers, he explained, asserts three
points. One, the Palestinians' his-
toric right to the land of Palestine;

two, the PLO's international legiti-
macy as sole representative of the
Palestinian people; and three, the
immediacy and necessity of an inter-
national peace conference.
"The question for us now is
whether the United States and Israel
are committed to the implementation
of 242," he said. "Whether the
United States and Israel are commit-

ted to peace or committed to con-
flict."
Abu-Lughod said it should be
clear to Israel and the United States,
as it has been to the world, that the
Palestinian struggle for national self-
determination is not going to go
away. Palestinians are committed to
liberating themselves from an occu-
pying force, he said.

WHAT'S
(s HAPPENING
RECREATIONAL SPORTS
'HO I/DA Y BUILDING HOURS

I

THE

LIST.

What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Speakers
"Sharing International
Strategies for the Future of
the Peace Movement" - Luc
Deliens, Belgian peace movement,
First Congregational Church of
Ypsilanti, 218 N. Adams, 7:30 pm.
Open to the public and free of charge.
Roundtable: "Poland 1988" -
Slavic Languages and Literatures Prof.
Bogdana Carpenter, History Prof.
Roman Szporluk, Lane Hall
Commons, 12 noon. Brown Bag
Series.
"Basic Books of Rudolf
Steiner" - Prof. E. Katz, 1923
Geddes Ave., 7:30 pm.
"Advances in Micellar Mobile
Phased HPLC" - Mark Klemp,
Chem. Dept., 1200 Chem. Bldg., 4
pm.
"Non-Kekule Molecules and
the Limits of Hund's Rule" -
Prof. Jerome Berson, Yale University,
1300 Chem. Bldg., 4 pm. Coffee,
3:30 pm.
"Ujima/Collective Work &
Responsibility" - Mukasa Dada,
Couzens Cafeteria, 8 pm.
"Ford Thunderbird and Mercury
Cougar: Racing into the
Future" - Video Disk Presentation
on the total re-design of the
Thunderbird/Cougar for 1989,
Chrysler Aud., 6 pm.
"What are the Residual
Stresses Doing in Our Bodies,
How Do They Respond to
External Loads, How Fast Do
They Change" - Y.C. Fung, 1010
Dow, 4 pm. Coffee, 2269 GG
Brown, 3:30 pm.
"Visual Adaption" - D. Green,
1017 Dow, 4-5 pm.
Meetings
BSU Meeting - Trotter House,
6:30-7:30 pm.
Native American Student
Association - Michigan Union, 6
PM.

International Affairs
Committee - International Center,
7:30 pm.
SAFEWALK Mass Meeting for
New Walkers - Anderson Rm.
Michigan Union, 8 pm. Safewalk
resumes on January 15, 1989.
Students Objectivism - New
Officer Elections, 812 Monroe St.,
7:30 pm.
Furthermore
Psychology Night - Exploring
Careers - Pendelton Rm.,
Michigan Union, 8 pm.
Women's Crisis Center
Volunteer Information Session
- Women's Crisis Center, 306 N.
Division, 5:30 pm.
English Peer Counseling -
4000A Michigan Union, 7-9 pm.
Help with papers and other English
related questions.
University Lutheran Chapel -
"Holden Village Vespers", 9 pm.
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Study Abroad Workshop -
International Center, 4-5 pm.
Order of Omega Holiday Party
- Kuenzal Rm., Michigan Union, 9
pm.
Dissertation Support Group -
3100 Michigan Union, 8:30 am.
Social for Gay and Bisexual
Male Students - E. Law Quad
Cook Rm., 9-11 pm.
Performances
Michigan Chamber Players -
Recital Hall, School of Music, 8 pm.
University Band and Campus
Band - Eric Becker and James
Nissen, conductors, Hill Aud., 8 pm.
"What is a Racist Comment?"
- Talk To Us Theatre, with
discussion afterwards. Oxford
Residence Hall, Geddes House, 9 pm.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
Play - "Utopia", Mendelssohn
Theatre, 8 pm.
Laughtrack-Comedy Show -
Marty Micoli, U-Club, 10 pm.

Psychology Night
Exploring Careers
Rep. from CP&P and professors available
for discussion
8pm Wed. Dec. 7 Pendleton Room
Sponsored by Undergraduate Psych Society and
Psi Chi
Cornerstone

DEC. 19
DEC. 20
DEC. 21
DEC. 22
DEC. 23
DEC. 24-26
DEC. 27
DEC. 28
DEC. 29
DEC.-30
DEC. 31-
JAN. 2
JAN. 3
JAN. 4
JAN. 5

CCRB
7AM-10PM
7AM-10PM
7AM-10PM
7AM-1OPM
7AM-10PM
CLOSED
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NCRB
7AM-9PM
7AM-9PM
"7AM-9PM
7AM-9PM
7AM-9PM
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7AM-7PM
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7AM-7PM

IMSB
CLOSED
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CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
9AM-7PM
9AM-7PM
9AM-7PM
9AM-7PM
CLOSED
11AM-7PM
11AM-7PM
11AM-7PM

CISTIAN~

FELLOWSHIP

(an interdenominational campus fellowship)
Students Dedicated to
Knowing and Communicating
Jesus Christ

Weekly Meetings:

Thursdays: 7:00 pm
219 Angell Hall

John Neff - 971-9150(0), 747-8831(H)
HOW TO MAKE YOUR
HOLIDA YS HAPPIER?

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