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April 13, 1988 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-04-13

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Page 10-The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, April 13, 1988
SPORTS OF THEMDAILY:
Netters trample Michigan St.

I

By TAYLOR LINCOLN
Despite head coach Brian Eisner's
concerns about a possible letdown
following last weekend's solid vic-
tory over Illinois, the men's tennis
team soundly defeated Michigan
State yesterday.
The Wolverines won the first
eight matches, with the no. 1 dou-
bles match pending at press-time.
The Wolverines were only tested in
their no.1 and no. 2 singles matches
- the rest of the team coasted to
easy victories.
Ed Nagel, at no. 1 singles,
coasted to a 6-2 victory over Michi-
gan State's Santiago Cash in the
first set, but had to fight back from a
5-2 deficit in the second set to win
7-6.
At no. 2 singles, Dan Goldberg
fought off a determined Fernando
Belmar 6-3, 4-6, 6-4. "I didn't play
very well in the first set, but I still
won fairly easily," said Goldberg.
"So I thought that I would get away
with just playing mediocre.
"(But) my concentration was a
little off and I lost the second set. It
took me a while to get going."
Malivai Washington, at no. 3
singles defeated Michigan State'
Paul Mesaros 6-4, 6-2. Jon Morris,
Brad Koontz, and Jean Roussel, at
the fourth through sixth singles
slots, lost a total of only five games
in dispatching their opponents.
"Overall I was pretty pleased,"

said Eisner. "The scores were fairly
decisive."
MSUOIL tap today
Playing your arch rival can either
increase your performance to its
best, or it can end a hot streak.
Michigan's Softball team hopes
that its doubleheader against Michi-
gan State in East Lansing today will
force them to play just a little bit
better so the Spartans do not put a
halt to their recent win streak.
Michigan, coming off of a pro-
ductive Big Ten roadtrip in Iowa, is
7-1 .in their last eight games and
looking for two more Big Ten
victories at State. Should they win,
Michigan would be in sole posses-
sion of first place in the Big Ten.
State lost three of four to Indiana
last weekend and that is exactly what
concerns coach Carol Hutchins.
"They (MSU) start slow every
year and play their best against us.
We usually struggle and win by
one."
That was the case last year as
Michigan won all four games the
two teams played - two of the vic-
tories by two runs or less.
-By LORY KNAPP
PASS PORT
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With this M.
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Michigan Union
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Adam's Rib
BY ADAM SCHRAGER
College basketball fans around the country, mark your calender.
On October 14, 1988, the opening day of Kansas Jayhawk basketball
practice, outspoken and loquacious television commentator Dick Vitale
will be scrubbing the floors of the Phog Allen Field House. This
humorous debacle will transpire all because Jayhawk head coach Larry
Brown chose last Friday to remain at Kansas, contrary to rumors that he
would coach elsewhere next season.
Over the past few weeks, earlier this season, and every other season
that Brown has roamed the plains of Lawrence, Kansas, basketball con-
noisseurs including Vitale, have assumed that Brown would leave
Kansas in the near future. Granted, their speculation was somewhat
warranted considering that Brown had coached three professional teams
and two college teams in the 16 years of his career. His decision to stay
at Kansas will mark the first job that he has held for more than five
seasons.
THE RUMORS circulating since Kansas claimed the national
championship less than two weeks ago were that Brown would carry on
as a wayward son and make peace only when he was done announcing
his intentions to reassume the coaching duties he held from 1979-81 at
UCLA. In fact, most everyone believed they were rumors no longer,
but instead certainties after Brown's meeting with Bruin officials last
Thursday.
UCLA Athletic Director Peter
Dalis had scheduled a press
conference to announce Brown's
hiring. Kansas' Sports Informa-
tion Department had prepared
statements concerning possible
replacements for Brown. Worst of
all, an assistant Kansas Athletic
Director said minutes before
Brown's press conference, "It's all
over. He's as good as gone."
While everyone was nailing the
coffin shut on Brown's tenure at
Kansas, critics started to attack the
New York native for his wander- %
ing fetishes, which have come as
often as indictments in President'
Reagan's administration. Com-
ments such as, "He can't hold a
job for any period of time," and1
"Will he ever stay put," sprung up
everywhere, particularly in bas-
ketball circles.,
While these people criticized
Brown's previous travellingy
agenda, they forgot the important
things that he brought to KU in
his five seasons there - recruits,
talented teams, victories (135), Kansas' coach Larry Brown led his
conference championships, two then surprised his critics by spurn
final four appearances, and a na- s h r

Despite all of Brown's critics,
he's still the Wizard of Oz
tional championship.
I am not advocating Brown's previous nomadic tendencies, but in
this case, his departure was definitely excusable.
Departure considerations aside, Brown should be deemed a coaching
wizard. When Lawrence fans start chanting, "Oz, Oz, Oz," they are not
cheering for nearby St. Louis Cardinals shortstop Ozzie Smith, but in-
stead for their apparently shy, demure coach, who creates miracles
almost as often as it rains in Ann Arbor.
IN HIS BEST Steven Spielberg impersonation, as an award-
winning director, Brown steered Best Actor nominee Danny Manning
and Best Supporting Actor choices Milt Newton, Chris Piper, Kevin
Pritchard, to a national championship victory over Oklahoma. This
accomplishment should go down as one of the greatest coaching jobs in
history.
The Jayhawks battled adversity throughout their season. Archie
Marshall, NCAA tournament star of two years past, hurt his good knee
in his first season back since reconstructive knee surgery. Starting cen-
ter Marvin Branch, who was expected to take much of the pressure of
All-World Manning, was declared academically ineligible. In all, the
season was trying for Brown, to say the least.

9

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Kansas, with the most losses
ever for a championship team
(11), accomplished the unthink-
able. Nobody thought that this
team could gel as they did and
mold to form what some are call-
ing the "greatest upset in tourna-
ment championship history."
Whether Larry Brown was to
leave Kansas or to stay does not
matter now. Wherever he goes and
whatever coaching jobs he takes,
he will do what he does best --
win games.
"I used to take -walks with a
guy who would say sometimes,
'You've got to stop and smell the
roses,"' said Brown after his, 83-
79, title victory.
I may be wrong, but I always
thought that roses were important
in college football, not in college
basketball.
With his coaching expertise, I
wouldn't doubt that Brown could
obtain those football roses. Just
give him a few seasons. Hope-
fully, he'll stay that long.

-Associated Press
S team to the NCAA championship and
ing a lucrative offer by UCLA to stay.

wim meuu .iyiawks.

0

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Thurs.-Sun.
April 14-17
Thurs.-Sun.
April 14-17

The University of Michigan
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Angel City by Sam Shepard,
presented by University Players
Tickets $6, call 764-0450
Trueblood Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
(Th-Sat), 2:00 p.m. (Sun)
On the Town, by Bernstein, Comden
& Green presented by Musical
Theatre Program
Tickets $9, $6, $4 (students), call 764-0450
Power Center, 8:00 p.m. (Th-Sat),
2:00 p.m. (Sun)

1
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The Medieval and Renaissance Collegium
announces
A Mini-Conference
on
TIME-SPACE-ITINERARIES-
TRAVEL-MAPS
in
THE MIDDLE AGES AND
THE RENAISSANCE

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For up-to-date pogram information on School of Music
events call the 24-Hour Music Hotline, 763-4726
Spring
$1 Days
Lease any apartment between
April 1 and April 30, 1988
for $100.
(Applied to -September rent)
t . VE9AW!2OLC.
}x , L387554443H

Saturday, April 16,1988, 9am to 4pm
The Clements Library
The University of Michigan
No Registration Necessary
Public Welcome
Call 763-2066 for further information
Are you confused by CRISP?!?
Do you feel lost in the chaos of
registration?
We are here to help!!IIII
THE CRISP ADVICE TABLE
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