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April 11, 1988 - Image 22

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-04-11

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44

12 U. THE NATIONAL COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

Dollars And Sense APRIL 1988

CAREER ROUNDUP
Graduates' starting salaries
Bachelor's 1988 % increase
Degrees from 1987

Non-corporate majors say
placement center biased

Math/Statistics
Sales/Marketing
Economics/Finance
Chemistry
Computer
Business Admin.
Accounting
Engineering
Liberal Arts
Other Fields
Master's Degrees
MBA w/Technical BS
Other Tech Fields
MBA w/Non-Tech BA
Engineering
Accounting
Other Fields

$26,112
22,848
23,136
25;692
27,372
22,920
24,324
29,820
22,608
26,316
$38,412
30,936
36,120
34,776
29,700
30,840

11.8
11.1
10.5
8.8
6.1
6.0
5.8
4.5
3.7
6.1
10.4
7.0
5.1
3.3
1.7
9.0

AVERAGE STARTING SALARIES FOR COLLEGE GRADUATES
TAKEN FROM THE 1988 NORTHWESTERN LINDOUIST-
ENDICOTTREPORT. THE DAIY NORTHWESTERN, NORTHWEST
...U. I
Never let 'em see you sweat ...
Handy interview hints from Purdue U.: Decide be-
forehand what exact job you are looking for. "Do
some preparation about what you want to do, what
skills you have which enable you to do that, how
your educational background has prepared you, any
work experience you might have had in that areaand
any campus activities in which you've been in-
volved," says Shirley Marciniak, assistant director of
the placement service at Purdue U.
It is very important to stop and think about what
you are going to say before you say something you
do not really mean, she said. "You may be asked a
hypothetical question so they can see how you think.
Take a minute to think about your answer. Someone
does not have to be talking all the time."
You should make sure there is no doubt about
when you will hear from the company, Marciniak
says.
Finally, she says, "You want to be professional
but you want to be yourself. It you've done your
homework, it's like going into a test. You need to
relax and trust in your preparation." .Curt Slyd-
er, The Purdue Exponent, Purdue U., IN
Social work is hot again . . . Nationally,
applications to schools of social work decreased
between 1979 and 1983 but began to increase sub-
stantially in 1984, said Edward Mullen, associate
dean of Columbia U.'s School of Social Work. "The
cutback of support and the consequence of that
(cutback) of increased visibility and the increased
number of people who are poor (means) conscious-
ness may be raised," he said. Mullen also said,
"Federal support for social work education has not
improved (since 1984). What you may be seeing is
an increasing number of students interested in pur-
suing social work as a career but not able to afford
the education." aMelissa Michelson, Col-
umbia Daily Spectator, Columbia U.,
NY

By Annette Ford
The Daily Orange
Syracuse U., NY
Not all Syracuse U. (SU) students
agree that the Placement Center pro-
vides services for the entire student
body.
Drama, art, human services and com-
munications majors are some non-
corporate fields in which students feel
the facility has nothing to offer.
"Performance majors do not go
through the Placement Center. With
drama, ... producers and directors are
not going to put a show on file and say,
'Send me people for this part,'"said Be-
verly Bloom, a SU drama faculty
member.
Linda Supon Weiss, assistant direc-
tor of the Placement Center, agrees that
these non-corporate area students are
not coming in for just that reason.
"Students in those areas don't per-
ceive us as being able to help them,"
Weiss said. When a job opportunity does
come up in one of those areas, the center
has a rough time finding people for the
interested employer because the stu-
dents don't register with them.
'It depends on-
whether or not I
did any drugs
that week.'
- SHARON SEXTON,
FRESHMAN,.
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY
'I don't think it's
right, but if I
want the job bad
enough I'd take
- MIKE DAVIS,
FRESHMAN,
INDUSTRIAL
EDUCATION &
TECHNOLOGY

The graduating art or drama student
is encouraged to go through the Place-
ment Center's orientation program, a
45-minute session giving an overview of
the services offered, such as clarifying
career goals and learning interviewing
skills. They are asked to register a
credentials file with the center,
Ewa Idzik, a senior in fashion design,
"didn't feel it was worth it" to register
with the center with only the hope if
something comes up, she'd be called. In-
stead, she has been working closely
with her instructors looking for job
openings and ideas.
Karen Altree Piemme, ajunior drama
major, said she has not used the Place-
ment Center because she and her peers
have been trained to "get out and hit the
streets and market ourselves."
Weiss said it can be beneficial for stu-
dents in non-corporate fields to come to
the center because "we help the stu-
dents consider options they may not
have thought of before. Theater stu-
dents are very good in presenting them-
selves, so they may be good in market-
ing or public relations. We show the stu-
dents other settings to use their skills,"

Pair challenges
bookstore with
own buyback
Central Michigan U. students
Dennis Mosser and Kevin Goddard
tried closing the book on what they
felt were unfair buyback rates at
the campus bookstore.
Mosser and Goddard used a com-
puter to match students with the
books they needed. "We thought if
we could get it to work in the
School of Business (Administra-
tion), we could go for the whole
thing," Mosser said.
Students sent cards describing
the books they wanted to buy and
sell: Mosser and Goddard then
matched students with the same
buying and selling needs, and sent
them cards stating who to buy from
and sell to. The students would call
each other and agree on a price,
which Mosser said could result in
about a $10 to $20 savings'for just
two books. Students were charged
$2 for the service.
Mosser said they invested $40
for computer discs and fliers, but he
did not know if they made a profit.
"I learned a lot," Mosser said. "We
didn't do it for, the money, we just
wanted to help other people."
a Mike Scrivano, Central Michigan Life,
Central Michigan U.

4

4

4

'1 feel since drug
testing isn't 100
percent accurate,
the employees
should have the
right to do
whatever they
want.'
- JAMES SEWELL,
FRESHMAN,
BIOCHEMISTRY
'I think it would
be an invasion of
my privacy.'
-GEORGANE
HOURIGAN, SENIOR,
PSYCHOLOGY

CHARLIE BOLTON, THE EASTERN PROGRESS, EASTERN KENTUCKY U.

i,
i

THEY'RE THEIR OWN BOSSES
Pros and cons ... Tom Sottile, a U. of
Florida finance major, bought the $50,000 Larry's
Old Fashioned Ice Cream Parlor with an inheritance
from his father and money borrowed from private
organizations two years ago. at ago 10. "(People)
look at me and I've got ay nice cothes. I drive a
new car. They didn't see the 40 pounds I lost, my
receding hairline, the ulcers. I was a perfectly healthy
person two years ago," Sottile says. "You know,
you're in school and something breaks down. One of
my employees may not know what to do and they
have to have access toyou. This is probably the main
problem with being a student (and running a busi-
ness)." Sottile missed a midterm because his freezer
blew up. "No one likes to get Cs and Ds. But it's a
sacrifice. You have to give up something. I give up
my sociallile and grades, but in return I got monet-
ary and personal satisfaction." .Jacqueline
Bueno, Tre Alligator, U. of Florida
Sports hotline . .. U. of Maryland, College
Park students Guy Brami and Marc lorio applied the
knowledge from their respective majors, marketing
and advertising, to one of theirfavorite pastimes and
created the Sports Page - a free, 24-hour sports
information phone service with national and local
scores and other sports news. They getan estimated

TOYOTA MOTOR SALES
(seepage2)
For a complete information kit on
special college student financing
call: 1-800-CAR-4-YOU
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD
(Seepapge 13)
For information about the Army
National Guard and the new GI bill
call: 1-800-638-7600"
AMERICAN EXPRESS
(see pape a15
For student applications for the
American Express card.
call: 1-800-THE-CARD
VUARNET FRANCE -
(See pane 9)
Write: 1550 E. Franklin Ave.
El Segundo, CA 90245
AT & T
(see page 5)
For information about the AT & T
card, products and services
call: 1-800-222-0300
ARMY RESERVE
(See Pae 31)
For information about the Army
Reserve's GI bill
call: 1-800-USA-ARMY

4

I

4

Sum auunil
100 to 110 calls on weekdays and 160 on weekends,
lorio said. The profit is enough to pay their way
through school. Sponsors pay to have brief commer-
cials played with the sports information. Tick Tock
Liquors was the first sponsor, but the list has ex-
panded to include United Energy Corp. and Bud-
weiser, lorio said. .Jonathan Seigel, The
Diamondback, U. of Maryland, College
Park
ACEing business ... ACE, the Association
of Collegiate Entrepreneurs, helps young people

who want to start their own businesses, providing
business and social contacts and professional
advice. "We're serious about business, and we are
producing serious businesses," said Doug Mellin-
ger, national director of ACE, which has its head-
quarters at Wichita State U. in Kansas. In 1987,
ACE's top 100 members, all age 30 or under, gros-
sed morethan $25 billion, he said. Founded in 1983,
ACE has 8,000 members in 56 countries. It also has
200 college campus chapters. "Brenda Fin-
nell, The University Daily Kansan, U. of
Kansas

4

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