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April 08, 1988 - Image 21

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-04-08
Note:
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MICH.ELLANY

No

rent control,

now what?

WEEKEND JESSICA GREENE

The homeless man sat down on a
park bench and watched. Across the
street from him, people were gather-
ing outside the front entrance of
McKinley Real Estate on Main St.
to rally support for rent control -
Proposal C on the city election bal-
lot..
The election was only four days
away. The organizer of the event - a
woman currently engaged in a court
battle with McKinley, claiming the
company terminated her lease because
she helped form a tenants union to
combat greedy landlords - spoke
through a bullhorn to the 50 or so
people in attendance.
"Let's start walking around in a
circle," she said after explaining how
McKinley was trying to throw her
onto the street.
The homeless man shook his head
before rising from the bench and
made his way across the street. He
wore a beat-up brown overcoat, a
black and yellow ski cap and carried a
sizeable walking stick. He was not
happy.
"We're tired of demonstrations,"
the man barked at the organizer. His
voice cracked with the kind of emo-
tion that comes only from spending
days wandering the streets and nights
sleeping in cardboard boxes. "You

JOH N
7 SHEA
want someone to talk? Let me talk.
I'm the one who can't pay."
The woman stopped talking and
let the homeless man take the floor.
"I've been in Ann Arbor all my life,"
he shouted to the group. "Now, I
can't move into a place without
$1000, S1500, S2000..."
The crowd understood; some even
cheered him. "Students don't make
Ann Arbor," the man continued.
"I've been here 20 years and I still
can't get an apartment."
More cheers.
Some suggested they form a circle
and walk around him in support, but
this seemed to upset him even more.
"Dig this, dig this," he shouted.
"You can walk around in circles all
day, still won't do nothing. I don't
know how many of you have had
things and lost things, but if you
don't contribute to the University,
you ain't got nothing in this town."
It had all the makings of a great
Hollywood movie. Rent control.

David, meet Goliath.
Unfortunately, the ending is not a
happy one. Last Monday, David got
the tar knocked out of him. Did Pro-
posal C ever have a chance of pass-
ing? Not with the landlords of Ann
Arbor bombarding local cable sta-
tions with commercials forecasting
apartment complexes would go the
way of the extinct water buffalo with
the passage of C. The homeless man
said what few wanted to acknowledge
but probably suspected at the rally:
rallies weren't going to beat televi-
sion ad campaigns. Money talks.
Oddly, renters make up three-fifths
of the residents in Ann Arbor, and if
students had gotten together and gone
to the polls, the ending of this tale
might have been different. If you're a
humanitarian, you can't bear the
sight of homeless people laying
down on air vents. If you're flat
broke, a big break on rent probably
sounds good. Who couldn't use a
couple of extra hundred dollars?
Well, everyone could, but the is-
sue isn't that simple. Some might
try to hang the death of Proposal C
squarely on the shoulders of students,
crying apathy and indifference all the
way. The homeless man was right:
See SHEA, Page 13

Wiliam

Bolcom

Pulitzer prize winning composer talks about
MTV, commercialism, and acadamics
INTERVIEW
School of Music Professor William Bolcom received a Pulitzer Prize
for music composition last week for a set of piano pieces entitled
"Twelve New Etudes." Bolcom, an internationally known composer, was
the runner-up for the 1985 Pulitzer Prize. A Seattle native, Bolcom has
been a member of the University faculty for 15 years, before which he
taught at the University of Washington, Queens College, and the Yale
Univesity Drama School. The affable Bolcom, who seems unaffected by
his sudden whirl of publicity, recently spoke with Daily arts staffer Ari
Schneider.
Daily: Did you expect to win this award?
Bolcom: Well, everyone else was expecting it for me at some time or
another because of the pieces I had done four years ago. In 1985, 1 nearly
won one; I was a runner-up and many people were much more angry than
I was that I didn't. I should have won it and now all the press and people
I talk to say this is a late awarding of that prize. That may be true but
frankly I don't care. It doesn't make an awful lot of difference.
D: What gave you the inspiration for the "12 New Etudes?"
B: The etudes that Chopin or anybody else wrote which have to do with
interpretive problems, technical problems, musical problems. People
who are studying piano are dealing with... problems that are interesting
things, things that would be something for students involved in
twentieth century piano literature. But that's just one level of the etudes.
On top of that, you have the poetry, the mood, the other things that are
there which are not so easily talked about. This particular set of etudes
was written for the use of Paul Jacobs, who was a wonderful pianist who
f died of AIDS in 1983. Of course, I was writing it for him to play and he
couldn't really do much of anything the last year of his life so I sort of
came to a stop on them- I just didn't feel like going on. But then what
happened is that this young pianist Marc Andre Hamelin was assigned to
play them for the festival in California. I heard him do them and I was so
inspired by that that I went and finished them.
He's also recorded them and I understand that the record and CD are
now out. So, that's the story and I'm very happy with the performance,
I'm happy with the pieces, I feel perfectly glad that they got the Pulitzer
and I don't feel that it's a matter of second best at all. It's a much less
sizable piece - 30 or some minutes where the other work is 3 hours. I
suppose that's a larger statement but I don't think it's such a bad thing.
D: Does having grown up around rural Washington state inspire you at
all for some works?
B: When I did my fourth symphony, commissioned by the St. Louis
Symphony, that reflected in a lot of ways, the expansivity of the
country. It's a very large kind of gesture. Out there, you've got these
great big mountains and everything's so big and so frightening. The sea
is very calm, the mountains are very craggy- everything is very!
(laughs) Very' whatever it is. It's a truly emphatic kind of work. So sure
that got me, especially because of the form I picked.
See INTERVIEW, Page 13

I

OFF THE WALL
Well I'm going insane
Yes I'm laughing at the frozen rain
And I'm so alone
honey when you gonna send me
home?
(In response)
BAD POETRY. VERY BAD.
DON'T MAJOR IN IT.
This hedonistic, materialistic U-M
student body is so busy satisfying
its own greed and stupid animal lust
that it doesn't even think to look for
something real to live for.
(In response)
TAKE ANOTHER BONG HIT
MAN
Michigan "men" are premature
ejaculators
(In response)
THAT'S BEACAUSE MICHIGAN
WOMEN ARE NOT WORTH
WAITING FOR.
(In response)
I object. Sex at Michigan is great --
it's the mornings after that suck.
Long ago there was something in
me, but now that thing is gone... I
cannot cry, I cannot care. That thing
will come back no more
(In response)
HE TOOK A LARGE SHIT
-All graffiti found in grad library

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PAGE'12

WEEKEND/APRIL 8, 1988

WEEKEND/APRIL 8, 1988,

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