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April 07, 1988 - Image 9

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-04-07

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Baseball
vs. Minnesota (DH)
Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m.
Ray Fisher Stadium
The Michigan Daily

SPORTS

Men's Tennis
vs. Purdue
Saturday
Track and Tennis Building

Thursday, April 7, 1988

T THE SPORTING VIEWS
Athletes showed their nasty
sides during month of March

; ..
x
r
,

Page 9
'M' downs Titans, 11-4
By MICHAEL SALINSKY
Bud Middaugh couldn't have asked for better luck.
Strapped for pitchers after six games in three days, the Michigan
coach got a little help from the elements yesterday. The second game
of the Wolverines' doubleheader with the University of Detroit Titans
was rained out after an 11-4 Michigan victory in the opener.
The win in the first game went to starter Ross Powell. The lefty
gave up four hits and struck out four in five innings of work.
Sparking the Wolverines (20-6) was Steve Finken, who reached
base all five times he came to the plate. Finken had a double, three
walks and was hit by a pitch, scoring three runs.
Phil Price, supplied the power for the victors. Price had five RBIs
on four-for-five hitting.
Chris Czarnik was the starter and loser for the Titans. Czarnik,
whose record falls to 3-2, was down only 2-1 to the powerful Wolver-
ines going into the fourth.
But in the fourth, after the first two men were retired, the Wolver-
ines struck for four runs. Finken and Gagin reached base to set up
Price and Greg Haeger who lashed back-to back doubles. Bill St. Peter
added an RBI to finish up the inning's scoring.

By ADAM BENSON
March, because of its nasty
weather, is said to come in like a
lion. This March, the lion roared its
way into the world of sports and de-
cided to act nasty for the entire
month.
In almost every level of competi-
tion - amateur, collegiate, or pro-
fessional - the month's premier
sporting events were dimmed by poor
on-court behavior. For every slam
dunk, home run, and Hamill camel,
there was a bench-clearing brawl,
disagreement with a coach, or lack of
tact.
The media spotlight is rightly fo-
cused on college basketball during
the stretch run and the beginning of
the NCAA tournament. March Mad-
ness is, for many sports fans, the
best time of the year.
This season, however, the race for
conference titles was marred by some
of the ugliest fights in the basketball
history. In the Southeastern Confer-
ence tournament semifinal, Georgia
and Florida had a fight that forced
Florida coach Norm Sloan to suspend
a player for the first round of the
NCAA tournament.
FLORIDA met St. John's, an-
other brawling team, in the first
round. In the Redmen's fight with
Providence, players and coaches be-
came involved, and one St.John's
player was arrested. Coach Lou Car-
neseca chose not to suspend his
player for the NCAA matchup with
the Gators.
It seems only fitting the Florida
wound up winning the game. Kudos
should go to Sloan, one of the few
sports figures to put ethics ahead of
winning games.
Baseball's spring training wasn't
without its own March Madness this
year, either. One of the most noted
events took place in the camp of the
Toronto Blue Jays, where George
Bell refused to move to the desig-

nated hitter spot in the lineup.
The Blue Jays are an enigma to
most baseball fans. They have one of
the most impressive batting orders in
baseball, yet last season the team's
offensive load had to be carried by
Bell, who hit 47 homers on his way
to MVP honors.
MANAGER Jimy Williams
hoped to move one of several
outstanding outfield prospects into
the lineup and help bolster the
offense. While Bell is the best
hitting outfielder the Blue Jays have,
he is the weakest on defense.
So it only made sense to move
Bell to the DH spot to clear a space
for a new outfielder, right? WRONG.
Bell took offense to being moved.
Instead of trying to see what was best
for the team, he couldn't see past his
hurt feelings.
Maybe this lack of team spirit can
help explain how the Blue Jays out-
choked the Tigers in the American
League East race last year. Bell is an
outstanding talent, but the Blue Jays
have had tons of talent for many
years, and they still have not won a
World Series.
If this club could set aside its egos
and follow the examples of clubs like
the 1985 Royals, or last year's
champs, the Minnesota Twins, it
could fulfill many of their fans' ex-
pectations. For now, Blue Jays fans
will have to settle for the soap opera
in the 'dugout to find any real
competition or concern.
WHILE GEORGE BELL is a
repeat offender, U.S. figure skater
Debi Thomas is a newcomer to the
poor-sport club. But no one can say
she showed any more tact or grace
than her baseball counterpart.
When Thomas lost to Katarina
Witt at the 1988 Calgary Olympics,
she earned the sympathy of millions
of Americans. There was no question
that she choked, but fans felt for her
anyway.

XX
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:J

1-

-Associated Press
George Bell, shown here in an angry moment, was upset all spring
training over the Blue Jays' decision to make him a DH.

Yet Debi Thomas found a way to
lose sympathy as well. During
March's World Figure Skating
Championships, CBS interviewed
Thomas, who reduced her bronze-
winning effort to nothing.
Thomas said that after her
Olympic performance that she felt
like turning to the crowd and asking
if "anybody wanted to trade an ABC
sports pin for a bronze medal?"
WHILE THOMAS may have
felt disappointed that she did not
capture the gold or silver, how many
skaters would have traded places with
her? How many fans would love to
have competed in the Olympics at
all?
Thomas lacks not only the gold
medal, but also lacks the charm and
the charisma to share the public eye
with a skater like Witt, or past
champions like Peggy Fleming and
Dorothy Hamill. Well, at least
Thomas has her Stanford education to
carry her through life.
At the end of last year, Sports Il-
lustrated bucked tradition. Instead of
giving its Sportsperson of the Year
honor to an athlete for an on-the-field
performance, they awarded a group of

athletes for their contributions to so-
ciety. At the time, this award seemed
disappointing. Now it seems quite
appropriate.
While George Bell and Debi
Thomas are away from the cameras,
they can do whatever they choose.
But fans don't want to hear their
whining or complaining - they'd
rather watch the Liz Manleys or the
Alan Trammells find the joy of win-
ning.
There's more to glory than getting
there, but also knowing how to act
when you don't.

Special Student and Youth Fares to
EUROPE
from New York on Scheduled Airlines!
DESTINATIONS OW RT
LONDON $175 $350
PARIS 206 412
FRANKFURT 220 440
ROMEMILAN 238 476
VIENNA 245 490
ZURICH/GENEVA 225 450
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OSLO 225 450
STOCKHOLM 230 460
HELSINKI 238 476
Above fares also apply from Washington, D.C. to London, Paris and
Frankfurt on non-stop service. Add-on fares from Boston, Chicago,
Pittsburgh, Minneapolis and many other U.S. cities are also available.
CALL OR WRITE FOR OUR SPECIAL FARES TO THE
SO. PACIFIC, AUSTRALIA, SO. AMERICA
Applications available for Eurail Youth Pass
and International Student I.D. Card.
For Reservations and Information Call:
WHOLE WORLD TRAVEL
Part of the worldwide STA Travel Network
17 E. 45th St., Suite 805, New York, NY 10017
(212) 986-9470

Sloan
.-. a good guy

I

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Albert Terrace 1506 Geddes
1700 Geddes

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a wide range of opportunities that include biomedical research, private
practice (including specialties), wildlife and zoo medicine, and more.
TO LEARN MORE, MEET A REPRESENTATIVE FROM
MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY'S
COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE
Thursday, April 7 --2-4 p.m.
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
Preprofessional Division
3200 Student Activities Building

Spacious 2 Bedroom Bi-Levels

Large 2 Bedroom Apartments

Furnished
Air conditioned
Laundry Facilities
Parking for Tenants
543 Church Street
(313) 761-1523
We also have other great properties!
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Yes
we're
open
Saturdays

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UNMI

R*TO JAPAN
DISCOUNT FARE
FROM DETROIT
(WEEKDAY DEPARTURE)

ALL NIPPON AIR
NORTHWEST
UNITED AIR
JAPAN AIR

$750.00
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President and Mrs. Robben Fleming
cordially invite all students to an
Open House

HOTEL PACKAGE -
TOKYO HOTEL SUNSHINE CITY PRINCE
2 NIGHTS $160.00 (Single)
OSAKA HOTEL NEW OTANI
2 NIGHTS $170.00 (Single)
p, r V ye t' j

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