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March 28, 1988 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-03-28

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The Michigan Daily-Monday, March 28, 1988-Pag#

Protesters call for

Dooley's.
By VICKI BAUER
Picketing and chanting, "H
hey! Ho ho! Violent bounce
have got to go!" about 20 peo
held a two-hour protest in fro
of Dooley's bar Friday night. T
protesters urged patrons to b
cott the bar in support of th
students who were allegedly
saulted by a Dooley's bouncer.
But employees of the b
lashed back verbally, saying t
charges made against the boun
were unjustifed.
Three University students h
week filed assault charges agai
the bouncer for using unnecessa
force to throw them out oft
bar. They said the boun
knocked one woman student
the floor, then grabbed anoti
woman student across the brea
slapped her face, and threw h
out the door into the alley.
"SHE WAS not assaulte
said Jeanne Gray, a Dooley
waitress and LSA sophomore.
saw it happen. I am a woma
and I would know if that w
assault."
Gray said the bouncer grabb
the woman around the waist af
repeatedly asking the group
leave for smoking marijuana
the bar.
But the woman said the gr
was smoking cigarettes,n
marijuana.

boycott
"Regardless if they were
ey, smoking pot or not, the bouncer
ers does not have the right to physi-
ple cally remove someone," said Di-
ont ane Killian, a protester and Nurs-
'he ing School junior. "When it gets
oy- to that point, you should call the
ree police."
as- ANN ARBOR Police Sgt.
Hartwig said bar employees have
ar the authority to use force in order
the to remove drunk and disorderly
cer people, but only in a defensive
situation.
ast Dooley's Manager Omid Os-
nst anloo said bouncers are fired for
ary hitting patrons, whether or not
the they are acting in self-defense.
cer "We tell the bouncer he
to should never be in the position to
her hit or be hit. If the situation
sts, looks like it will get out of hand,
her he should grab the person in a
head lock and call the police,"
d," Osanloo said.
y's OSANLOO said although
"I the bouncer used poor judgment,
an, he will not be fired because he
vas was not abusive. He said the
bouncer is pressing charges
bed against the woman student for
fter assault, claiming she slapped him
to during the struggle.
in The woman student is
considering filing a civil law suit
oup against Dooley's as well as a
not criminal suit against the bouncer,
she said.

Levin supports INF
treaty, arms talks

4

By ANDREW MILLS
Calling the recently-signed INF
arms reduction treaty "a major ad-
vance in terms of U.S.-Soviet rela-
tions," U.S. Sen. Carl Levin (D-
Mich.) told a group of about 100
Friday night that when advocating
arms control, they should not ignore
conventional weapons in negotia-
tions.
The Senate is currently debating
the ratification of the treaty signed
last December by Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev and President
Ronald Reagan, which would drasti-
cally reduce the inventories of
medium-range nuclear missiles on
both sides of the iron curtain. Levin,
a member of the Senate Armed Ser-
vices Committee, predicts ratifica-
tion soon.
"INF will be ratified," he said.
"One way or another it will be rati-
fied."
Levin, whose speech,"Where are
we going in Arms Control" was
sponsored by the Coalition for Arms
Control - 2nd Congressional Dis-
trict, told the audience that one of
the breakthroughs with the Interme-
diate Nuclear Force treaty was the
"precedent-setting" level of on-site
verification by both sides.

The extremely intrusive nature of
that verification would, among other
things, place Soviet officials in U.S.
airports and train stations to monitor!
troop movements (and similarly
with Americans in Russia). This
will lead, Levin said, to increased
confidence and trust in future super-
power treaty negotiations.
"It's not the military side of the
INF that's important, but rather the
breakthrough in confidence," he said.
After INF, currently under debate
in the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, Levin said the START
treaty, which would reduce stock-
piles of long-range missiles, is next
on the agenda.
There are obstacles to the signing
of such a treaty, however, most
prominent of which is Reagan's
Strategic Defense Initiative or "Star
Wars" program.
Levin, who with some other sen-
ators met with Gorbachev a few
weeks ago, said that the Soviets
would not sign a START treaty un-
less it included provisions about ,
SDI.
"At the (December) summit in
Washington, that issue was finessed
- it was fudged - by the agree-
See Levin, Page 5

Daily Photo by ALEXANDRA BREZ
Andrea Densham (holding sign) marches in a picket line in front of
Dooley's bar on Maynard Street Friday. The picketers protested an
alleged incident of unnecessary violence on the part of Dooley's bouncers
the night of March 19.

Amateur radio clubs
hold anniversary contest

By JEFFREY SCHULMAN
Seventy-five years ago yesterday,
record rains flooded much of the
Midwest, knocking out telegraph and
telephone lines. But amateur radio
clubs in Ann Arbor and Columbus,
Ohio combatted the communication
breakdown by relaying warnings to
stranded households - marking the
first time amateur radios were used
to provide communication in an
emergency.
Yesterday, both the local club
station, WOUM, and the station at
Ohio State University commemo-
rated the anniversary by holding a
nationwide amateur radio contest.
All weekend, members of the
University's radio club received and
transmitted messages throughout the
country from the ninth floor of
South Quad residence hall.
THE MESSAGES could be
heard by anyone with a short-wave
radio, but can only be transmitted by
licensed owners and operators of ham
radios.
"People who talk to us are already
hams," said Joe Tillo, president of
the club and a graduate student in

electrical engineering. Tillo spoke
with radio operators in Canada, Ten-
nessee, Maryland, and Ohio.
Chris Brown, an engineering se-
nior, spoke to another amateur radio
operator in Uruguay. "(It was) a
faint connection, but it was kind of
exciting to speak to people outside
of the country," he said.
ALL RADIO operators who
successfully communicated over the
ham radio this weekend will receive
a specially endorsed certificate.
But ham radio is not just a
hobby.
When the Mexico City earthquake
hit, Dave Rasche, a member of the
University's radio club, handled 250
messages, alerted Americans of the
help desperately needed, and provided
families with information pertaining
to their loved ones.
If there is a severe tornado watch,
some ham radio operators drive
around looking for the tornado.
When they find the tornado they ra-
dio the National Weather Service and
alert them to the location of the
storm.

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
YOUR UNCLE WANTS
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ARMY ROTC
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Schedule your "No Obligation" !nterview Now!
Call Captain O'Rourke at 764-2400

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BALSA sponsors panel on
minorities in academics

v .. v . /

.1

By KEN BURRY
Only student activists can prompt
institutions to change their hiring
policies and attract more minority
professors, said Derrick Bell, a Har-
vard law professor and panelist at
last weekend's conference on "Issues
of Race in the Ivory Tower."
Bell said that as a Black profes-
sor, he serves as a model for minor-
ity students trying to overcome
racial inequality. He said "too little
has changed" since his struggles as a
student in the 1950s-.
Bell said universities are similar
to institutions in a capitalist system,
in which the customers, or students,
buy their education.
He placed responsibility for
change on students because, he said,

if they are dissatisfied with the
"product," they can use their influ-
ence as buyers.
"The answer lies in your hands,"
he told the audience of about 100, in
the conference sponsored by the
Black Law Students Alliance.
Wayne State Prof. Edward Little-
john, speaking at the same panel
See BALSA, Page 5
CORRECTION
The Sexual Assault Prevention
and Awareness Center's crisis hot-
line in starting next fall term. A
story in last week's Daily incorrectly
stated that the date had not been set
for starting the hotline.

ANNOUNCEMENT
The Office of Minority Affairs, University of Michigan,
will host Dr. Jeff oward, noted Psychologist and
President of the Efficacy Institute, as a Martin Luther King/
Cesar Chavez/Rosa Parks Visiting Scholar,
March 29 through 31,1988.
Dr. Howard will give a public lecture on "Advancing
the Intellectual Develo pment of Minorities: A Framework
for Analysis and Action" at the Institute for Social
Research, Room 6050, on Tuesday March 29,
beginning at 3:30 p.m.
The lecture will be followed by a reception
from 5:00-6:00p.m.
We encourage students faculty, and staff to meet
with Dr. Howard iuring his visit here.
For information regarding his schedule of activities
and available meeting times please call
Valerie Munson at 936-1055.

Spring
$1 Day.
Lease any apartment between
March 16 and March 31 1988
for $100.
(Applied to September rent)
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610 S. Forest

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520 Packard
543 Church
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I We also have other great properties!
More Information at:
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............. - w, -- .............

THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Speakers
Michael Asciutto and G a r y
Garcia - will read from their works
as part of the Guild House Writers
Series. 8 p.m., the Guild House, 802
Monroe St.
Prof I.V. Yannas - Polymetric
Matrices for Regeneration of Skinm and
Peripheral Nerve. 4 p.m., Dow
Building, room 1017.
Michael R. Harbut M.D., and
Bruce A. Miller - Harbut will

Complexes." 4 p.m., room 1200.
Meetings
The Public Relations Club -
June - Kirchgagter from Harris
advertising will speak. 4:30 p.m.,
Freize Building, room 2035.
The Indoor Gardening
Association of Ann Arbor. -
7:30 p.m., Mathei Botanical Garden,
1800 N. Dixboro Rd.
Christian Science Organization

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GRADUATE STUDENTS:
you grew up in Jersey and dreamed of being a grad student at'U of M..
Out of state TA s and RAs have an unfair tax burden
because. of their tuition waves
PROTEST, DIAG, THURSDAY'MARCH 31ST, NOON
nl~rriKUanim Da nev vfnI I AAAD(U rT ITrfrKlTAV ft

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