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January 14, 1988 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


How Congressional seats would be apportioned in 1991
based on 1987 Census Bureau estimates
ti .
,a
SStates gaining seats Sa taes losin seats
change new "ta change ne~w total
1. California +4 49 7. Michigan -2 16
2. Florida +3 22 8. New York -2 32
3. Texas +3 30 9. Ohio -2 19
4. Arizona +1 6 10. Pa. -2 21
5. Georgia +1 11 11. Illinois -1 21
6. Virginia +1 11 12. Iowa -1 5
13. Kansas -1 4
[AMother states would remain 14. Mass. -1 10
the sane 15. W. Virginia -1 3
Sourca: Elction Data Services Inc. AP
Reapportionment
Based on 1987 Census Burean estimates, seats in the House of Represen-
tatives would be reapportioned as shown in 1991.

lestaurateur
By JOON KANG
Two Republican state legislators have
proposed to reduce the minimum wage of
waitpeople in an attempt to create 60,000 new
jobs. However, local restaurant employers don't
believe the plan will work.
The House Republican proposal - which
faces much opposition in the house - decreases
the minimum wage for waitpeople to $2.01 from
the current level of $2.51, which in effect
increases the amount employers can estimate as
earnings on tips from 25 percent to 40 percent.
A report done by the Michigan Restaurant
Association three years ago said that lowering
wages would add 1,900 new restaurants and $2
billion in new restaurant construction.
Some owners believe that in Ann Arbor there
is no incentive to bring in new restaurants or
more workers. "There isn't an oversupply of
people trying to find jobs," said George Paron,
owner of the Brown Jug on South University.
"On this street alone, there are at least 10 job
openings... the jobs are there," he said.
Steve Buchanan, manager at Ashley's
restaurant of State Street, also agreed that the

The Michiga
s question lov
proposal would be ineffective. "I don't believe
that it has anything to do with the wages offered.
It has more to do with the effectiveness of
management and the location of the restaurant,
especially in Ann Arbor," he said.
But the main emphasis is on revitalizing the
job .market in the state, according to Michael
Neuman, president of the Michigan Restaurant
Association.
Employers could save money through the new
proposal because they will be required to pay
tipped employees less. Employees must receive
at least the federal hourly wage of $3.35 an hour,
but tipped employees can make the difference up
in tips. Employers currently assume 25 percent
of $3.35 will be made up in tips, but the
proposal would change the amount to 40 percent.
"The proposal is not a reduction in the
minimum wage overall," Neuman said. "If the
tip-credit came out less than the federal wage
level, the employer has to match the difference."
House Democrats call the proposal ineffective.
Brett McRae, a spokesperson for Rep. Perry
Bullard (D-Ann Arbor), said the tip-credit
difference would save each restaurant an extra

0

ver wage biil
$8,000 to $30,000 per year.
"Many restaurants gross that much in a
day...it doesn't make that much of a difference to
them. The task force 'report is simply a
conclusory assertation with no evidence to back
it up," McRae said.
Republican Caucus leader Jack Mowat said,
"Most states are at the 40 percent credit level and
Michigan is one of the slowest developing states
in increasing labor. We're trying to rectify that
situation."
The proposal is just one area in a 15-point
plan introduced by Representatives GordoO
Sparks (R-Troy) and Paul Hillegonds (R-Holland)
to improve the state's business climate.
The sudden interest in table servers' wages
came when Jerry Hill, president of Bill Knapp's
Inc. and originator of the proposal idea voiced
opposition to the Republican proposal.
To Ann Arbor table servers, many of whom
are students, the proposed decrease in the
minimum wage would have only a slight impact.
The Associated Press contributed to this
report.

in Daily-Thursday, January 14, 1988- Page 5
11 oil's

Students to lobby on

Toxic dump frightens parents'
KINGSFORD, Mich. (AP) - A building for 1,100 students on
citizen's group wants a local school acres of land owned by the city.
district to reverse its decision to build The land is adjacent to a form
an elementary school next to the site dump used by Ford Motor Co. a
of a former industrial dump, a Kingsford Chemical Co.
spokesperson said yesterday. School Board President T
The Breitung Township District's Brown said he believed the site w
Board of Education approved safe, but he thinks the oppositi
construction of an $8.7 million will be so intense that the board w

27
ner
nd
im
was
on
will

By ROSEMARY WUMMEL
Tina Meldrum and Kasha Fluegge
will leave their studies behind and
spend the weekend in Washington
D.C. attending a forum on El Sal-
vador.
Meldrum and Fluegge, both LSA
sophomores, are joining 40 other
college students to look at pressing
human rights issues in El Salvador.
"I think its really sad that El
Salvador is a dead issue," said Mel-
drum. "It's the third largest recipient
of federal aid, and yet democratic
principles and human rights are not

necessarily being practiced."
The forum, sponsored by the
Committee in Solidarity with the
People of El Salvador, features
speakers from the University's sister
school in San Salvador, as well as
organizations against the El Sal-
vadoran government.
Meldrum, an MSA representative

helping
and a member of the asse
Peace and Justice Committ
the forum will encourage
pants to educate their peer
problems in El Salvador, TI
mittee and LASC are plan
dedicate a week to raising av
about the problems in El S
this March, and she hopes th

El Salvador
mbly's will give her ideas for events.
ee, said She also hopes to learn ways to
partici- spark a large turnout in dorm semi-
*s about nars, which the committee is spon-
he com- soring on El Salvador this winter.
ining to Few students showed up last term
wareness for forums on militarism, she said.'
Salvador Meldrum joined the committe'e
1e forum last term.

High court
allows school
* censorship
(Contnued from Page 2)
tains to any other situations other
than high school newspapers,"
Shapiro said, adding that this leaves
the Supreme Court's options open if
a case involving a university news-
paper were to arise.
"It is a common tool of the
Supreme Court," he noted.
Robert Baine, the attorney for
Hazelwood East said, "I don't think
(colleges) were an issue in the case."
He noted that he was not sure what
the outcome would be "if you were
to find a university paper with a
similar case."
White wrote that there should be
judicial intervention involving free
speech rights for students "only
when the decision to censor a
school-sponsored publication, the-
atrical production, or other vehicle of
student expression has no valid edu-
cational purpose."
The dissenting justices viewed the
court's decision as a step towards
"thought control," and that "such
unthinking contempt for individual
rights is intolerable."
"The Supreme Court is getting
worse and worse. They're turning
more to the right," said Jean King,
ACLU Chairperson for the Washte-
naw County Branch.

have to consider other land.

inminmmmmminminmm mmmmmmmminmmmminmm s

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