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March 21, 1988 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-03-21

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*MARCH 1988 The Student Body

U_ THE NATIONAL COLLEGE NEWSPAPER 19

*C 9 TTd BRECREATIONM 1POdTU NATSPPR 9
Beyond urinalysis Biking across America Minds over muscle Undercover dribbler
One school rejects NCAA Students tackle mental Sports shrink argues Reporter braves basketball
drug policy as short-sighted fatigue and snowy imagination is a powerful training for inside scoop on
program. mountains on 3500-mile trip. team strategy. women's sports.
Page 22 Page 22 Page 23 Page 22

Adnan Qadeer atop New York's Verrazano Narrows, the country's longest suspen-
sioe bridge.
New York bridge testsI obr' i mv
clmbr wil to liveO

Woman reporter
fights 'men only'
locker rooms
By Lisa Remwolt
The Minnesota Daily
U. of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Reporter Anne Upson burst into
the Iowa press room after the Min-
nesota-Iowa football game, eyes
blazing with anger.
"I've never felt so degraded in my
life," the reporter explained.
Minnesota is the only Big Ten
school that does not have a policy
guaranteeing female reporters
equal access to players.
Michigan, Michigan State, Illi-
nois, Indiana, Ohio, Northwestern
and Iowa have closed locker rooms.
The media gather in a separate in-
terview room. After the players
have showered and dressed, they
meet with reporters.
Purdue has a similar policy. Wis-
consin opens its locker rooms to re-
porters of both sexes.
Phil Haddy, assistant sports in-
formation director at Iowa, said the
interview room is preferable to the
locker room.
Upson agreed. "It works really
well because everybody gets equal
access to the players."
Minnesota Sports Information
Director Bob Peterson defended
their policy.
"I prefer locker room interviews,"
he said. "(Iowa's) system isn't one
I'd like to use. It limits the number
of people you can talk to. I like to
have everyone available.
coRo

By Mona Miyasato
The Daily Californian
U. of California, Berkeley
Adnan Qadeer was running out of
bridges to climb.
This U. of California, Berkeley
architecture student climbed the San
Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge and Gol-
den Gate Bridge last year, sporting
video and 35mm cameras for his
documentary photography class.
But the Bay and Golden Gate bridges
are only two of the 12 longest suspen-
sion bridges in the United States. There
were still 10 more calling his name.
"I asked my professor, Roy Thomas,
where I should go. . . He said, 'Go to
New York. . . it's like a flea market of
bridges,'" Qadeer said.
Heeding his professor's advice,
Qadeer flew to the East Coast to climb
nine of the 10 other suspension bridges.
"I was only interested in the biggest
and highest sizes," he said.
By the end of his two week trip,
Qadeer had mounted the George
Washington, Brooklyn, Manhattan,

Williamsburg, Verrazano Narrows and
Whitestone bridges in New York, the
Bloomington Memorial bridges in Dela-
ware, and the Mackinaw Bridge in
Michigan.
Yet this Pakistani native never ex-
pected that he would risk his life while
climbing New York's Verrazano Nar-
rows, the country's longest bridge. At
4,260 feet long and 700 feet tall, it con-
nects Staten Island to Brooklyn.
Unable to obtain safety belts from the
bridge department, Qadeer and bridge
electrician Bob Whalen decided to ride
the bridge elevators to the top and take
photographs.
When the two descended to the road-
way, they discovered that the exit from
the elevator shaft to the freeway had
been padlocked.
After trying unsuccessfully to signal
the security officers, Whalen, panicked
and frustrated, asked Qadeer to de-
scend the bridge cables and get help.
"To him this was a matter of life and
death," Qadeer said.
Qadeer handed Whalen one of his
See BRIDGE, Page 21

By 1991, 12 million will suffer from 'Yuppie flu'

By Paula Selby
Kansas State Collegian
Kansas State U.
They are plagued by joint pains, but
they don't have arthritis. They are over-
whelmingly exhausted, but they don't
have acquired immune deficiency syn-
drome. They have difficulty concentrat-
ing and often lose their memory, but
they don't have Alzheimer's disease.
What "they" have has been nick-
named the "Yuppie Flu" because it
usually occurs in ambitious people who
push themselves, said Evelyn Zanella,
leader of the Manhattan Chronic Ep-
stein-Barr Virus Syndrome (CEBV)
support group.
Although few people are aware of the
disease, the Centers for Disease Control
estimates 12 million Americans will
contract CEBV in the next several

oi,STEVC Nis oUR LIFESTLE...In. 'YuPPEE5'15 0UT YES,STE.VE,-E.
TE "IBLE. ,IV5 PASSE .. AnT TOP TALLOFF, YUPPIE FLU...
THOEY'E umEawcA
-, DISEASE ATRns.. TEHT'rrO.
DOT ORAPIK
JAY CARR, STEPHEN F. AUSTIN STATE U., TA, THE PINE LOG
years, as compared to a projected tyles.
270,000 AIDS cases by 1991. "You don't have the energy to get up
CEBV has no known cause or cure, It and do anything. You're just incapaci-
. CEV ha no now caue orcure It tated," Zanella said.
is a rare disease described as similar to te mos mm p s
but worse than endless mononucleosis. CEBV are extreme fatigue, muscle
CEBV can be "really frightening" be- aches, joint pain, eye and mouth dry-
cause it requires educated, successful ness, difficulty in concentrating, mem-
people to completely modify their lifes- See FLU, Page 21 '

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