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March 17, 1988 - Image 41

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-03-17

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alition support for Jesse Jackson. Often,
however, alternatives devote much space
to international issues. Last fall Free As-
sociation produced a 233-inch, two-part se-
ries on Central American death squads.
Former Perspective editor Mark Guma
says readers respond "because finally
there's a sort of nonhysterical voice on the
left." Yet critics charge-often fairly-
that the subjective journalism is out-and-
out advocacy. "I think you have to take
the information with a large grain of
salt," says UCLA senior Ron Bell, a for-
mer Daily Bruin editor in chief. Then
again, articles in the conservative press
can be self-righteous and one-sided, too. To
its credit, Free Association ran a front-
page, introspective article on racism in
the left in its premiere issue.
Shoestring budgets: Editors of mainstream
papers don't live in fear of competition: few
alternatives capture much advertising.
Harvard's monthly Perspective is a nota-
ble exception; 80 percent of the paper's
revenue comes from the same pizza and
copy-center ads found in other campus pa-
pers. But for most, money remains tight,
with budgets pieced together from contri-
butions and subscriptions. "We're glad
we're pulling our own strings," says Free
Association's Pat Dunn. "But we're having
a hard time finding the strings to pull."

RICK FRIEDMAN-BLACK STAR
Free-for-all: Sub Review'~s Jay Hodos (left), visiting publisher Charles Eppler.

How long the new alternative papers will
remain viable is unclear. Quality and a
consistent vision are hard to maintain in
the high-turnover student press, and per-
spectives change. The once liberal Colora-
do Daily, for example, lost its designation
as the "official" University of Colorado
newspaper in 1971. Now, although techni-
cally "alternative," it boasts a higher circu-
lation than the school-supported, semi-
weekly Campus Press. CU journalism
professor Bill McReynolds-who was in-
strumental in removing the Daily's official

status-notes "a mellowing out toward re-
sponsibility." That could invite new thun-
der on the left-or from papers that are
targeting certain readers at other schools,
such as Jewish (Shofar at UMass), Asian
(UCLA's Pacific Ties) or Hispanic (UCLA's
La Gente). Every effort may not survive.
But for the moment, at least, students can
enjoy a diversity of opinion that other
newspaper readers can only envy.
CHRISTOPHER M. BELLITTO with
LAUREEN LAZAROVICI in LosAngeles,
NANCY KLINGENERpinArnherst, PAMELA F.
S C H WAR TZ in Philadelphia and bureau reports

1
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King faisa1
International Prize
AN INVITATION TO SUBMIT NOMINATIONS FOR
THE KING FAISAL INTERNATIONAL PRIZE IN MEDICINE AND
THE KING FAISAL INTERNATIONAL PRIZE IN SCIENCE

G

The General Secretariat of King Faisal International Prize has the pleasure in inviting universities, academies, educational institutions and
research centers all over the World to nominate qualified candidates for
The King Faisal International Prize in Medicine in the topic of
"INFERTILITY"
and
The King Faisal International. Prize in Science in the topic of
"PHYSICS"
which will be awarded in 1409H. / 1989, according to the following:
1. A nominee must have accomplished an outstanding academic work on the subject of the Prize topic, benefiting mankind and enriching human
progress.
2. The work submitted must be original and published.
3. The work submitted must not have been previously awarded a prize by any international organization.
4. Nominations by individuals or political parties will not be accepted.
5. Nominations should include:
a) An official letter by a recognized educational institution, indicating the nominated works.
b) A C.V. of the nominee's academic background, experience and published works..
c) Ten copies of the works submitted for nomination.
d) A copy of educational certificates.
e) Three coloured photos ( 10 x 15 cm )
f) Full address and telephone number.
6. Nominations will be evaluated by a Selection Committee consisting of highly recognized specialists in the field.
7. More than one person may share the Prize.
8. The winners names will be announced in January 1989, and the Prize will be awarded in an official ceremony at the headquarter of the King
Faisal Foundation in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, at a later date.
9. The Prize consists of:
(1) A certificate in the winner's name containing an abstract of the work that qualified him/her for the prize.
(2) A gold medal.
(3) A sum of three hundred and fifty thousand Saudi Riyals, (approximately US$ 93,333).
10. The latest date for receiving the complete nomination requirements will be 19/12/1408H. (1/8/1988).
11. No nomination papers or works will be returned to the senders.
12. All correspondences by registered airmail must be addressed to:
THE GENERAL SECRETARIAT, KING FAISAL INTERNATIONAL PRIZE
P.O. BOX 22476, RIYADH 11495, KINGDOM OF SAUDI ARABIA Bushnak

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