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March 14, 1988 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-03-14

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Ninety-eight years of editorial freedom
Vol. XCVIII, No. 109 Ann Arbor, Michigan -Monday, March 14, 1988 Copyright 1988, The Michigan Daily

Groups

plan

response to

Doily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Michigan's All-American Gary Grant, playing in his last home game, drew rave reviews from both Ohio State Buckeyes (above) and ap-
preciative fans (below).

Morin' West
Tournament sends
'M' to Salt Lake City

'code'
By STEVE KNOPPER
Members of several student
groups gathered in a closed meeting
last night to coordinate their
opposition to Interim University
President Robben Fleming's pro-
posed anti-harassment policy.
The University's Board of Re-
gents are expected to vote on Flem-
ing's proposal this week.
MSA Student Rights Committee
chair Mike Phillips said the groups
- which include the Michigan Stu-
dent Assembly, the United Coalition
Against Racism, and the Latin
American Solidarity Committee -
are developing a proposal of their
own, in which a board of students
and University employees would
judge accusations of racial and sexual
harassment and apply appropriate
sanctions.
ALLsMEMBERS of the Uni-
versity community - including
University administrators and faculty
- would be under the board's juris-
diction, said Phillips, who expressed
opposition to such a plan.
Also under discussion are precon-
ditions for supporting the adoption
of such a plan. These include de-
manding the "disciplining" LSA
Dean Peter Steiner, who was accused
by many earlier this year for making
remarks they said were insensitive to
Blacks. Steiner and several col-
leagues have since maintained that
the remarks, addressing minority en-
rollment, were taken out of context.
Phillips said that MSA would not
approve any proposal issued by the
groups if they include sanctions for
non-academic behavior.
"FOR FIVE years, we've been
fighting to stop a code. This is a
policy we don't think should exist,
no matter who has power," Phillips
said.
In a related development, the
University's Affirmative Action Of-
fice released a draft document Friday
containing the specific procedures for
student hearings and punishments
under Fleming's proposal.
The draft - which elaborates on
the hearing procedures in Fleming's
original document - calls due pro-

draft
cess a "flexible concept," and main-
tains that an adequate system can be
set up by the University. The details
of the process are "procedural," said
Office Director Virginia Nordby, and
do not require the approval of the re-
gents.
FLEMING'S proposal, released
two weeks ago, would set up a panel
of two students and one faculty
member to judge guilt or innocence
in student harassment cases and de-
Several campus groups
are developing a proposal
in which a board of stu-
dents and University- em-
ployees would judge
accusations of harassment
and apply sanctions.

By PETE STEINERT
Michigan has not faired well in
the Southeast, Midwest, and East
Regionals over the last three years in
the NCAA tournament. So what the
heck? Why not try the West?
The Wolverines (24-7) drew the
No. 3 seed in the West Regional of
the 64-team tourney, it was an-
nounced yesterday. They willface
14th-seeded Boise State in their
tournament opener Thursday in Salt
Lake City.
Arizona - who defeated Michi-
gan at the Great Alaska Shootout
last November - grabbed the No. 1
seed in the West; and North Car-
olina, the No. 2 seed.
"I don't really have a lot of reac-
tion," Michigan coach Bill Frieder
said. "You just have to get ready for
who you're going to play and then
go from there. Everybody's going to
have tough games in the NCAA
tournament."

In Frieder's three previous tour-
nament appearances as coach, the
Wolverines have bowed out in the
second round each time.
Boise State, winner of the Big
Sky conference, posted a 24-7 record
during the regular season. The Bron-
cos are led by guard Chris Childs and
forward Amell Jones.
"We got film on them," Frieder
said. "My guys (assistant coaches)
are starting to look at 'em."
"Who knows?" Terry Mills said.
"We mighttget called back tonight
(last night) to watch it."
Frieder refuses to look past Boise
State and ahead to a possible second-
round matchup against either Florida
or St. John's. "I'm not even think-
ing about that," the eighth-year
coach said.
Michigan is one of five Big Ten
schools in the tourney, joining Pur-
due, Illinois, Indiana, and Iowa. The
Hawkeyes own the No. 5 seed in the
West Regional.

Dolly Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Seniors help Blue
blast Bucks, 95-76

cide the punishment.
Although MSA and other student
groups have consistently opposed
academic sanctions, the Black Stu-
dent Union said last week that
Fleming's proposal was not a code,
and should be judged as a racial ha-
rassment policy.
UCAR has also said it supports
sanctions if they apply to adminis-
trators, faculty, and students, but it
has made no formal statement about
Fleming's policy.
IN FACT, Fleming's document
may have pitted the student groups
favoring sanctions for racist behavior
against the groups opposing any
sanctions. Phillips said, "A lot of
people are jumping on Fleming's
boat. Those minority groups are
selling themselves short - they
think that just because they say
(Fleming's proposal) is not a code,
it's not a code."
According to MSA officials,
Fleming's proposal infringes on due
See PROPOSAL, Page 2

By SCOTT SHAFFER
The Gary Grant era of Michigan
basketball came to an end on Satur-
day in a game that spanned nearly
the entire range of human emotion.
The final score read Michigan 95,
Ohio State 76, but it was the intense
emotional display that is sure to be
remembered by the sell-out crowd
years after the point totals are

forgotten.
It mattered little to the 13,609
fans that they were not seeing vin-
tage Grant. They gave him three
standing ovations throughout the day
and serenaded him with chants of
"Gary! Gary!" in the games' waning
moments despite the fact that he
See GRANT, Page 10

Pfarty
looks to
common
students
By RYAN TUTAK
The Common Sense party says
I the Michigan Student Assembly
should represent the "average" stu-
dent, and not merely those who are
politically active.
Common Sense will be compet-
ing with one other party and ten in-
dependent candidates for assembly
seats in the campus-wide elections
March 22 and 23.
The party's presidential candidate
Cheryl Tilles, chair of MSA's bud-
get priorities committee and an LSA
junior, resigned from the election
campaign yesterday after admitting
to altering dinner receipts charged to
MSA. If elected, she said she will
defer her seat to the party's vice-
presidential candidate Ricky Ne-
meroff, an LSA junior.
Nemeroff said MSA should ad-
dress the "common" and "day-to-day"
needs of students before passing res-

MSA REP QUITS PRESIDENTIAL RACE:
Tilles charged with
fraud, resigns post

By RYAN TUTAK
Michigan Student Assembly
presidential candidate Cheryl Tilles
resigned as chair of the assembly's
budget priorities committee yester-
day after admitting to altering dinner
receipts charged to MSA.
Tilles, an LSA junior, had taken
some committee members to a local
Pizza Hut on March 4. The total
cost of the dinner was $11.53, but
she, requested reimbursement for
$41.53 to include the costs of a cal-
culator she bought for the office.
INSID.

Tilles
... drops out of race

The receipt for the calculator was
lost, she said.
MSA Treasurer Alexandra War-
ren, a business school junior, said
Tilles knew MSA had separate
reimbursement forms to fill out for
lost receipts, since she had used
them before.
"Why wouldn't she come up and
tell us that she forged the receipt?"
MSA vice-president Wendy Sharp,
an LSA senior, said. "I think she's
trying to find a way to justify it, and
she can't."
Tilles said she regretted not fill-
ing out the separate reimbursement
form, but that it was not intentional.
"If had remembered to do it, I would
have done it," Tilles said. "I wasn't
even getting all of my money back
(by requesting $41.53). If I knew
how to get all of my money back, I
would have used the other forms."
Warren also found five other al-
ready reimbursed dinner bills Tilles
had submitted earlier in the year.
One bill was from the Escoffier
restaurant for $40.14, and another

MSA '

MSA should afrm te comvih
me~nt to humran rights it made by
sp n oi g E a v~ e k ai vote aist the CIA ecrut n
resoluiivon.
'::Bruce Cockbniw rock's unsung
hero.
.AIM. V

and English departments.
The party members said many
student interests are ignored because
MSA is not in touch with its con-

_.
4 .

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