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March 10, 1988 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AFSCME
Union complains
about lack of
student support
Continued from Page 3 Fus

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 10, 1988-Page 5
Conference to focus on workers

By ELIZABETH STUPPLER
Students can learn about and dis-
cuss the issues affecting the United
States' work force at the Institute of
Public Policy Studies' (IPPS) fourth
annual student-organized conference
on "Developing Human Capital in
Changing U.S. Economy" tomor-
row.
"IPPS's goal is to try to stimu-
late conversation between academics
and practitioners," IPPS Director and
Professor of Political Science Edie
Goldenberg said.

"We exist in order to bring practi-
tioners together and discuss issues
overlapping," said IPPS conference
chair Tracy Gomes.
Gomes said the IPPS's conference
is unique because about 30 public
policy graduate students organized it.
"It is the only student-run policy
conference in the entire Midwest,"
she said.
Speakers from Michigan and sur-
rounding states will discuss topics
including educational reform, manu-
facturing matters, working women in

the changing U.S. economy, adult
literacy in the U.S., minorities in the
U.S. workforce, and re-training dis-
placed workers.
"(The conference) helps public
policy students learn about the policy
area it addresses, and organize and
pull off a totally professional high
quality conference," Goldberg said.
In past years, between 200 and
500 students have participated in the
event. The conference will be held
from 8:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. in the
Rackham Building.

The picketers expressed support
for Nelson McEwen, a Black Build-
ing Services employee who said he
was the victim of a racially moti-
vated assault by supervisor James
Boyd last month, and Avis Maria, a
union steward who was suspended
indefinitely last month after arguing
with supervisor Tim Block. Maria
said Block tried to prevent her from
taking a written grievance from
McEwen.
Boyd and Block were unavailable
for comment yesterday.
Workers at the picket also voiced
anger about working conditions in
Building Services, and said the de-
partment is understaffed and supervi-
sors intimidate employees who com-
plain about the conditions.
"PEOPLE SHOULD be aware
that if they come here (to work),
they're going to get subjected to this
kind of harassment," union steward
Doug Heidman said.
But University Assistant Person-
nel Administrator Bruce Pringle said
yesterday he believes management
respects the employees and the
grievance procedure.
The grievance procedure "is a
contractual right the workers have,,
and we take it very seriously... as to
supervisors obstructing the grievance
procedure, I'm not aware of that at
all." said Pringle. ;
Fliers, which were circulated,
around campus prior to the picket,
called on students to gather on the
Diag yesterday at noon to march to
Plant Building Services and join the

Research
Continued from Page 1
Justin Schwartz, a member of the
Michigan Alliance for Disarmament,
said, "The increase in military fund-
ing is a very disturbing trend. It
basically shows that the University
has a very strong commitment to
becoming 'Pentagon Midwest."'
Schwartz attributed part of the in-

crease to the change in the regents'
research guidelines, which were
changed last year. Before the change,
classified research that was deter-
mined to have an "end-use" that could
be used to "kill or maim human be-
ings" was not allowed at the Univer-
sity. No such restrictions now exist.
There is only one classified re-
search project currently being con-
ducted at the University - a study
by Theodore Birdsall, an electrical
engineering and computer science

professor.
Schwartz supports the notion that
the University impose strong restric-
tions on the types of research that
can be conducted.
Tammy Wagner, the Michigan
Student Assembly military research
adviser and a member of the Coali-
tion Against Weapons Research, said
the amount of research funded by the
DOD is a "bad sign."
"We have to try to put an end to
weapons research at the University,"
she said.
I IT I~ fi~1t

POLICE NOTES

AFSCME workers protest alleged incidents of racism involving building ser-
vices supervisors by picketing in front of the plant services building.

picket, but only one student showed
up.
SEVERAL union members said
they were disappointed with the lack
of student participation. AFSCME
bargaining chair Judy Levy criticized
the United Coalition Against Racism
(UCAR), which endorsed the picket,
and said the group had not done
enough to encourage student partici-
pation.
UCAR's endorsement of the
picket was "paper support, not real

support," Levy said. "I would en-
courage them to make it real sup-
port."
But UCAR steering committee
member Kim Smith said yesterday,
that the lack of student turnout was'
not the group's fault.
"It's not like we can just say 'go'
and people will go," Smith said. "All'
we can do is advertise."

Break-in arrest
Ann Arbor police arrested a sus-
pect Tuesday for attempting to break
into a residence in the 1100 block of
Church Street and steal $500 worth
of tapes and compact discs, Sgt. Jan
Suomala said yesterday.
Suomala said the suspect was
attempting the theft through an un-
locked door when he was seen by
other building residents, who called

the police. The building residents
were able to restrain the suspect from
escaping until the police arrived,
Suomala said.
The suspect was scheduled to
appear yesterday before Ann Arbor
Municipal court for arraignment af-
ter spending the night in jail.
-By Melissa Ramsdell

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