100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 10, 1988 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 10, 1988- Page 3

Bush gains; Kemp, Hart
may drop out of race

By the Associated Press
Republican resistance to Vice
President George Bush's bid for the
White House began crumbling
yesterday as the impact of his
fabulous Super Tuesday showing
sank in. Democrats Michael
Dukakis, Albert Gore and Jesse
Jackson savored their own successes
while aiming for next week's
showdown in Illinois.
Rep. Jack Kemp (R-New York)
scheduled a news conference for
Tuesday, and sources said he would
withdraw from the race. Similar
rumors surrounded the campaign of
Colorado Senator Gary Hart, who
put his all travel plans on hold and
Pat Robertson, who talked in terms
of expanding his support for a

campaign rerun in 1992.
Senator Dole (R-Kansas) awoke
to a campaign in shambles after
losing all 17 Super Tuesday states
and concedes that success in Illinois
is critical.
Local politicos shied away from
making endorsements. Rep. Bob
Carr (D-East Lansing) said "It is
obviously a plus to have a friend in
the White House, but I don't think
you have to kill yourself in the
snows of New Hampshire to have
that happen."
Former president Jimmy Carter,
speaking in Rochester, Mich., said
he did not believe Bush would be a
formidable candidate. "As a
Democrat, I am relieved by the fact
that Bush will be the (Republican)

nominee," Carter said. The former
president added he "was surprised at
how well" Senator Gore (D-Tenn.)
did, and was most surprised "at the
breadth of acceptance of Jesse
Jackson."
Jackson's results were
encouraging for his Michigan
supporters. Super Tuesday exit
polling showed Jackson had strong
support from lower-income voters,
but Rep. John Conyers (D-Detroit)
said the candidates's vote getting
ability crossed social lines as well as
racial.
Others were less impressed. Ben
Wattenberg, of the American
Enterprise Institute, said Jackson
lacked experience and described him
as a "blame-America-first business-
bashing radical."

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Bob Diaz, assistant librarian for reference and bibliographic instruction, helps Maria Brayboy, first year LSA
student, find a book.

Library si
an increas4
By MARK SWARTZ
Graduates from the University's
School of Information and Library
Studies are no longer destined to
push carts and.check out books for
harried students. Library studies, ac-
cording to Mary Cary, admissions
director of the school, has grown be-
yond the traditional setting o f
schools and government offices and
into the offices of the corporate
world.
The field is expanding, thanks to
the rising tide of technological inno-
vations in data compilation. New
methods of storing and retrieving in-
formation create a new employment
opportunity for the computer literate.
But Cary insisted, "We aren't getting
straight techy types. We're getting
students who are more interested in
dealing with people than program-
ming."
Cary said increasingly complex
systems require what the corporations
have dubbed "research brokers." Such
workers are essential to the execu-
tive, because they hold the key to
vast storehouses of information - a
valuable commodity these days, she
said.
"SALARIES are higher in the

fence graduates find
e~ in job opportunities
private sector," Cary said. Since large in the schools and librarians with
companies can afford to pay more engineering backgrounds," Cary said.
money for the services of a librarian, Nancy Busch, a Ph.D. candidate at
they account for an increasing num- the school, ascribed the dwindling
ber of library school graduates, she number of school librarians to the
explained. The average starting salary increase in accessibility of other ca-
for a librarian with a master's degree reers for women. "As our field has
is about $20,000, while a corporate been largely made up of women, the
librarian makes an average of almost disappearance of the idea that a
$29,000, Cary said. woman must be a nurse, a teacher, or
The School of Information and a librarian has resulted in a decrease,'
Library Studies, cited in a recent Li- she said.
brary Quarterly survey of research li- BUSCH acknowledged recent at-
brary directors as having the number tempts to attract more people to the
one program for both its Masters and position of school librarians through
Ph.D departments, has been growing the attraction of higher salaries.
over the last five years. The school Public institutions are beginning tc
boasts a current record high enroll- recognize the value of librarians now
ment of 301 Masters candidates this that they are experiencing difficulty
year. Cary pointed to a "renewed in- in finding any, Busch said.
terest in the profession" as a chief Library schools have closed in at
reason for the increase. least 15 universities across the coun-
Contrary to this abundance of try - including Western Michigan
growth of students at the University University - contributing to the
is a lack of qualified workers in pub- nationwide shortage. The dearth of
lic institutions like school libraries graduate schools may also have
and government-sponsored offices. pushed more students to the Univer-
The New York Public Library, for sity, Cary said.
example, fills only about nine out As the job market in the field
every 10 positions available at any shifts from the public sector to the
given time. "The U.S. is-facing a private, the University School of
severe shortage of librarians to work Research and Library Studies is ac-

Union protests z
By JIM PONIEWOZIK
A group of about 25 University workers protesting
alleged mistreatment of Building Services employees
by management picketed the University Plant Building
Services offices yesterday.
The picketers demanded, among other things, repar-
ations for two workers who they say were unfairly
treated by supervisors.
The picket was sponsored by American Federation
of State, County and Municipal Employees

0 "
alleged incidents
(AFSCME) local 1583, which represents custodians in
the University's Building Services department. Several
workers in the department have recently complained of
harassment by supervisors and have claimed that some
of the alleged incidents of harassment were racially
motivated.
"I'm fed up with all the activities going on in man-
agement... the scare tactics, the racism, and sexism,"
said custodian Eric Stevens, one of several Building
Services employees at the picket.
See AFSCME, Page 5

h
it
e
s
e
a
it
e
h
0
v
y
it
n
e
if
e
e
f

INFO *FEST'
WHERE YOU CAN EAT,
DRINK, BE MERRY, AND LEARN
SOMETHING AT THE SAME TIME

'88

ODAY.
Mac 1
you. But that's not
on. Visit our Study

Need to satis-
fy your sweet
tooth? Like
to win prizes?
Then you've
got a fun eve-
ning ahead of
all that's going
Skills booth,

to manage your time. Or take a
look at our CD-ROM display, and
get a chance to play with a com-
puter. We also have campus maps,
giveaways, and lots of valuable in-
formation on the library. So come
on down. Tonight
is the night. Come
to INFO*FEST. = -
It's free. It's fun.

THE LIST.
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

comadating their job placement pro-
cedure. In addition to maintaining a
job bulletin board, it sponsors visit-
ing interviewers from various corpo-
rations, as well as government agen-
cies.

and get some helpful hints on how

Brought to you by the Undergraduate Library and the Residence Hall libraries.

Speakers:
Dr. Maynard Kilgendorf -
"Origin and Canon of Scripture,"
7:30 p.m., 1511 Washtenaw, 663-
5560..
Phil Crane (R- Illinois) -
"What's up in Washington," 7:30
p.m., MLB. Lecture Room 2.
Victor Rubio - "El Salvador
Prospects for Peace," 7:30 p.m.,
Angell Hall Auditorium A.
James Ackerman - The Early
Modern Country House: Wright
and Le Corbusier, 5 p.m. 180
Tappen Hall.
Professor George Estabrook
- "Traditional Subsistence and
Soil Management Practices in
Central Interior Portugal," noon,
2009 Museums building.
Donna Wendt - "Growing up
with Dick and Jane- Bagging The
Rape Culture," a lunch hour
discussion series on s e x u a 1
exploitation, noon- 1p.m., Mason
Hall Room 2444.
Pastor Charles Hawthorne -
"Christian or Cult: How to tell the
difference," 7 p.m., Agape Campus
Fellowship Student Bible Study.
George Zirbes - "An Artist's
view of Czechoslovakia," 7:30
p.m., 2104 Art and Architecture
Auditorium, School of Art- North
Campus.
Robert Baldwin - "Studies of
Peptide Helic Formation and the
Pathway of Protein Folding," 4
p.m., North Lecture Hall, Medical
Science Building H.
Christopher Prendergast -
"B audelaire and the Politics o f
Modernite," 4:10 p.m., B137
MLB.
Martin Zimmerman - "The
Future of the Auto Industry," 5
p.m., 140 Lorch Hall.
University President Robert
Flemming - The Code,
presented by Undergraduate Law
"- ' . - I}nQ 1fo ..__ all

UCAR - United Coalition
Against Racism. Meeting, 6 p.m.,
Union.
Palestine Solidarity Committee -
General Meeting, 7 p.m., 4203,
Union.
U-M Women's Lacrosse Club
- Meeting 4 p.m. - 6 p.m.,
Coliseum on the corner of Hill and
Fifth Street.
Rainforest Action
Movement - Meeting.
Knowledge of world's vanishing
rainforests; 7 p.m., 1520 Dana
Building.
Department of Chemistry
Seminar - Physical TBA, 4
p.m., room 1200.
Michigan Economic Society
- Meeting, 5 p.m., 140 Lorch
Hall.

A

CLASS

ACT

SENIOR PLEDGE PROGRAM

1

9

8

8

......W..
. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .
.. . . .
.......

CENTER FO R
WESTERN EUROPEAN STUDIES
A limited number of spaces
remain open for the UM
summer study abroad programs
in London or Florence
Earn 6 in-residence credits by taking 2 courses in
the humanities and/or social sciences
Interested students should contact
The Center for Western European Studies
immediately for-further
information and applications
Center for Western European Studies
The University of Michigan
5208 Angell Hall
(313) 764-4311

Furthermore:
MFA students -
Reading. Pendleton
Union,12:15 pm
Boys of the Lough
p.m. and 10 p.m., at the
1/2 S. Main.
Battle of the Bands
p.m., semifinals, U-Club.

Poetry
Room,
- 7:30
Ark, 637
- 9:30

Pledge

Your Support When Called

Build a Tradition - The University of Michigan

University Lutheran Chapel
- 6 p.m. 1511 Washtenaw, 663-
5560. Dollar Dinner and Devotion
Michigras '88 - 8 p.m.-1
a.m., Michigan Union.
R.C. Players - A Midsummer
Night's Dream. 8 p.m., Students
$3 Adults $5 Tickets at the Door.
Bible Studyabased on the
gospel of Matthew - 7 p.m. -
8 p.m., Willow Tree Apartments 7-
C.
Israeli Folk Dancing - 7.:30
p.m. - 10 p.m., One hour of
instruction followed by open
dancing. For Beginning and
advanced students. HIllel, fee $1.
Indian Movie - Garam Hawa

This is your
to
ZIMS of Ann Arbor's
Grand Opening Party
March 10,1988
7:00 to 10:00 p.m.
Special Guest:
WRIF's Carl Coffey

PERFECT POST-HOLIDAY SNACK!

x
o
\ l Ne IO D\ ,
*Vs

1
a

I'M LITTLE ALMEE
from Golden Gem Almonds

BUY DIRECT FROM GROWER PROCESSOR
NATURAL, SHELLED ALMONDS - HUGE SIZE
U.S. EXTRA #1.

L

-J

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan