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March 09, 1988 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-03-09

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, March 9, 1988-Page 3

Doily Photo by JESSICA GREENE
Gustavo Adolfo Noyola, president of the University of El Salvador, asks
University students for moral and material support during a speech last
night at Rackham Ampitheater. The speech, sponsored by the Michigan
Student Assembly Peace and Justice Committee, was part of El Salvador
week.
Salvadoran speakers ask
for 'U' student suport

Super
co hider
selection
delayed
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
The selection of a first-choice
location for the $4.4 billion
Supercolliding Super Conductor has
been delayed so that Department of
Energy officials could consider an
Environmental Impact Statement
before making their decision.
A "preferred site" for the collider
will be selected in November,
instead of July, department
Spokesperson Jeff Sherwood said
yesterday.
The department will gather
information on the collider's
environmental effects at the various
sites, and will release a draft report
of their findings in August,
Sherwood said.
Energy Secretary John Herrington
will confirm the decision on the
collider's site next January, as was
already planned, Sherwood said.
Seven states, including Michigan,
are still in contention for the
collider. Michigan's proposed site is
located in Stockbridge, a city
halfway between Ann Arbor and East
Lansing. It is also within an hour
from Detroit Metropolitan Airport.
In the past, officials working
closely on the collider project have
said that the collider's environmental
impact will be minimal, although
people who may live near the site
have voiced concerns about the
disposal of radioactive waste and the
possibility of an accident.
The Superconducting Super
Collider, upon its completion in
1996, will be the largest such
collider in the world. It will use
10,000 superconducting magnets to
propel streams of protons around a
53-mile, underground track at close
to the speed of light.

Daily Photo by KAREN HANDELMAN
Lead singer for "Vice", a band from Eastern Kentucky University, belts out a heavy metal song at MTV and
Energizer's "Rock and Roll Challenge", held last night in the Michigan Union ballroom. Unfortunately for
"Vice", Ann Arbor's "The Difference" won the regional competition.
Local band wins MTV regional

Rock and Roll

By SHARON TEHAN
Two speakers from the University's
sister university in El Salvador asked
students for "moral and economic
solidarity," as well as an understand-
ing of their struggles at a speech last
night.
Gustavo Adolfo Noyola, president of
the University of El Salvador, and
Eliseo Ascencion, member of the
student government at the university,
spoke about El Salvadoran president
Napoleon Duarte, military interven-
tion at the University of El Salvador,
and the current civil war.
"In 1972, I was again captured and
tortured," Noyola said, referring to a
1972 military take-over of the uni-
versity when students and officials
were exiled and the campus was de-
stroyed. "They broke my ribs, cut

my hair and left me for dead." Noyola
told the crowd of about 100.
Ascencio, who like Noyola spoke
through an interpreter, said the the
university now faces severe financial
problems. Duarte is unsympathetic
to pleas for more money to help the
school, he said.
"The concrete problem of university
students is that we do not have
rooms in which to hold classes or the
chalk, the paper or anyway to repro-
duce scientific documents necessary
for our studies," Ascencio said.
"You ask what it is that North
Americans can do; the answer is ob-
vious. We can't ask you for the $2
million a day that your government
sends our military. We do ask for
your solidarity, moral as well as
economic," Ascencio said.

By KRISTINE LALONDE
Spring break for University
students may have just ended, but for
the Ann Arbor's band " T h e
Difference," vacation hasn't even
begun.
Last night, the group, made up of
two University alumni and three
students, won the regional semi-final
of the MTV/Energizer Rock and
Roll Challenge for college bands.
They now head for the finals in
Florida next week.
The crowd watching the
competiton in the Union Ballroom
roared support for the band, which
regularly performs at R i c k s
American Cafe, the Blind Pig and
other local bars.
"WE'RE TAKING Ann Arbor
to the nationals," said band member
Tom Campbell, a communications
graduate student. "When you work as

hard as we do th
tonight things click
The band will
Florida March 15
the MTV spring b
just for making itt
will win at least $
a $1,000 schclarsh
The winnerc
competition willt
cash, a $3,000 sc
college and a tw
session in New Yo
"I'D LOVE t
national title ands
Ann Arbor," Cams
the competition.
"The Differe
against three oth
from across thec
from Wright St
"Vice" from Ea
University, and "I

Challenge'
pings click, and Indiana University of Pennsylvania.
ked." Competition judges, including
not only fly to MTV video jockey Kevin Seal and
th to film part of record executive John Post, based.
reak special, but their decision on originality,
to the finals, they creativity, performance and musical
1,500 in cash and content. The judging was completed
ip to their school. on a scale basis.
of the national "The Difference" will compete
take in $5,000 in against bands other finalists from,
holarship to their regional competitions at William
o-day recording Patterson College in Wayne, NY,
irk City. Georgia Tech in Atlanta, GA, and
o go and win the Tufts University in Medford, MA. ,
say that I'm from WIQB disc jockey Carey
ipbell said before Carrington and MTV video jockey
Kevin Seals took over for Energizer
nce" competed spokesperson and star of the new TV
er college bands series "Highwayman" Jacko, who
country, "IMU," was scheduled to emcee the event.
ate University, He had to cancel because of
stern Kentucky scheduling conflicts with shooting
Learn How" from for the television show.

Femi ng
Continued from Page 1
prejudices, insensitivities and
intolerances."
The current rules governing
faculty misconduct are spread out
among Board of Regents bylaws, the
staff's Standard Practice Guide, and
various administrative memos.
According to the guide, a staff
member can be dismissed for
"misconduct, incompetence or other
good reason."
Discipline, according to the
guide, can range from a reprimand to
a disciplinary layoff. Additionally,
regental bylaw 5.09 allows for the
punishment of tenured faculty
members.
BUT MCCLAMROCH said
these rules "are not very specific.
You couldn't call them procedures."
He called the rules "inadequate."
McClamroch said faculty and

student rules should not be the same.
He said rules for faculty members
must balance "academic freedom" -
professors' rights to teach whatever
they want - and University
standards under which employees
must act.
Virginia Nordby, director of the
University's Affirmative Action
Office, said staff rules should be
stricter than student rules. "The
University, as a public employer,
can and should extract a higher level
of accountability and performance
from its employees," she said.
MICHIGAN Student Assembly
President Ken Weine said Fleming's
proposed policies have never
addressed racial and sexual
harassment by staff and faculty.'
Weine cited comments made by
LSA Dean Peter Steiner about
minority involvement, which many
said were racist. Others, such as
Fleming and the regents, said the
remarks had been taken out of
context.

0 "
Primaries
Continued from Page 1
delegates at stake and called it "a
tremendous personal victory" for his
boss.
Dole's best state was Missouri,
but even there he trailed the vice
president narrowly in partial returns.
Pat Robertson was out of the
running almost everywhere. Rep.
Jack Kemp was farther behind, and
seemed a candidate for withdrawal
from the race.
Dole, while campaigning Tuesday
in Springfield, Ill., said, "if we take a
little bath today, I am going to start
mt road to recovery in Illinois just
like I did 40 years ago." He hoped to
carry a few states and snare enough to
carry him credibly to next, week's

primary fight in Illinois.
JACKSON pocketed wins in
Virginia and Louisiana, led in
Mississippi and competed strongly in
Texas and several other states as he
vied to parlay his Black political base
into several hundred Democratic
National Convention delegates. He
was running second in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia and North Carolina.
Gore's early performance boosted
him ahead of Gephardt in the battle
to emerge as the moderate Democrat-
ic contender for the industrial state
battles to come. The Tennessee sena-
tor was ahead in early returns in Ala-
bama and Arkansas and in tight
contests with Jackson in North
Carolina and Georgia to go with his
victories in Tennessee, Kentucky and
Oklahoma.
Gephardt was in jeopardy of fail-
ing to qualify for delegates in several
states.

A[KID- CLASSES FOR BEGINNERS
An introductory course is taught by Sensei Takashi Kushida, 8th
degree black belt from Japan. Two new classes start in March:
- Thursdays 6:30-7:30 pm (Mar. 17, 24, 31, Apr. 7, 14)
- Saturdays 10:30-11:30 am (Mar. 19, 26, Apr. 2, 9, 16)
Cost: $20 for five sessions. Classes held in the Genyokan Dojo
in Ann Arbor, 749 Airport Blvd. (behind the State Rd. K-Mart).
For information, call 662-4686.
AIKIDO YOSHINKAI® ASSOCIATION OF NORTH AMERICA
ZIMS
FUN SPOT OF ANN ARBOR
OPEN 7 DAYS 10AM - 2 AM
John Lewis plays the best in music and video nightly.
Thursday is WRIF guest deejay night.

NOW SHOWING:

1

.

.

THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

or

ARCADE BARBERS

-

HAPPY HOUR
Mon-Fri 4:30-7pm
Thurs & Sun 8-1 Opm
25o Draft - $1 pitcher
5o Well
Free hors D'oeuvres & popcorn

DRINK SPECIALS
"Thurs&"Sun 10-2pm
75¢ Long Island Iced Teas
" Deejay drink specials

FEATURING:

Speakers:
Dr. Charlie Clemens -
"Witness to War," Environmental
Advocacy film/speaker series.
Noon, Rm. 1046 Dana Building.
Ann Mayer - "The Chang-
ing Meanings of Islamic Law," 4
p.m., Room 116 Hutchins Hall.
Ali Ramadhan _ "The In-
ternational Institute of Islamic
Thought: Islamization of Knowl-
edge," 7:30 p.m. Kuenzel Room,
Michigan Union.
Shlomo Izre'el - "The
Amarna Language: A Sociolin-
guistic Account," 3 p.m., Room
3050 Frieze Building.
Harold Cruse - "American
Blacks and the Communist
Movement, 1919-1925," noon,
Commons Room, Lane Hall.
Aline Lindbeck -
"Selected Approaches to the Total
Synthesis of Forskolin," 4:00
p.m., Room 1300, Chemistry
Building.
Dr. Robert Malina -
"Timino' of Growth Sniirts in

Meetings:
LSA Student Goverment
- Mass Meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
Wolverine Room, Michigan
Union.
Ceder Point Interviews-
Michigan Union, 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Biology Honors Concentrators -
Informal discussion, 7:00 p.m.,
2075 Nat. Sci.
Furthermore:
Rice & Beans Dinner -
Cooked by Salvadoran Sanctuary
Family, 6 p.m., First Congrega-
tional Church, 608 E. William,
$3 donation.
Engineering Career Day
- 3:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m., Rack-
ham Memorial Building, 100
Farnsworth, Detroit. $3 per stu-
dent.
Michigras '88 - 8:00
p.m.- 1:00 a.m., Michigan
Union.
Battle of the Bands -
9:30 p.m., semifinals, U-Club.
Jim Bajor - Pianist, 7:30

NEXUS Creatif Paul Sebastian

|I

LADIES NIGHT
Wednesday Night
Alldrinks - 750

r

I

Redken Paul Mitchell

K.M.S.

Also: Discounts on Nexus refills
No. 6 Nickels Arcade 665-78941

5 LARGE SATELLITE TV'S for all
761-3663
(in Briarwood Mall)

sports events

p

I I

A

class

ACT

SENIOR PLEDGE PROGRAM

1

9

8

8

D CENTER FOR
WESTERN EUROPEAN STUDIES
A limited number of spaces
remain open for the UM
summer study abroad programs
in London or Florence
Earn 6 in-residence credits by taking 2 courses in

err

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