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March 07, 1988 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-03-07

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The Michigan Daily-Monday, March 7, 1988- Page 5
Students write to free prisoners

By ANNA BORGMAN
Ellen Ross mechanically folded
up a letter, slipped it into an enve-
lope, licked it shut. And added it to
the fifteen other letters she'd written
and stacked in a neat pile before her.
"My tongue feels like paste," said
Ross, a junior in the Residential
College and one of about 50 partici-
pants in the first annual Amnesty
Write-a-thon. "My hand gave out on
me. I'll try to write a few more
tonight if I can."
Members of the local and campus
groups of Amnesty International
sponsored the five-hour Write-a-thon
as a way to garner a mass of letters
to send to governments all over the
world, asking for better conditions or
freedom for various political prison-
ers.
The groups set up a table in the
Michigan Union Saturday to
encourage passersbys to sign peti-
tions and pre-printed letters, or sit
down and write their own protest
letters if they had the time. They
raised money for postage and other
costs through a donation bucket and
outside sponsors.
"Letter writing is our basic tool,"

said Mariana Robles, Ann Arbor
resident and coordinator for the local
Amnesty group. She added that at
least 20 people were writing at all
times throughout the day.
The group writes on behalf of
conscientious objectors to the draft,
refugees, prisoners who have not

"adopted prisoner of conscience."
Velikanova, imprisoned for "anti-
Soviet agitation and propaganda,"
has been granted a pardon but feels
that accepting it would be an admis-
sion of guilt, Robles said.
Deborah Blatt, an LSA senior
who helped start the campus group

'My tongue feels like paste. My hand gave out on me.
I'll try to write a few more tonight if I can.'
- Ellen Ross, a junior in the Residential College and
one of about 50 participants in the first annual Amnesty
Write-a-thon.

the campus group who was also in-
volved in Amnesty International
during high school.
"They're asking just that people
be treated with respect and dignify. I
don't see how anybody can object to
that," she said, adding that Amnesty
does not support any political party
or platform.
Jane Krumlauf, an assistant pro-
fessor in the School of Nursing,
spent a half hour writing about ffve
letters during the Write-a-thon. She
brought along her three children,
saying she especially wanted her
nine-year old daughter Jennifer and
her 14-year old son John to realize
how lucky they are to live in the
United States.
Krumlauf is not a member of the
Amnesty groups here in Ann Arbor,
but is concerned with human rights,
partly due to time she has spent in
Haiti.
When asked if she thought the
letters she was writing would mare a
difference, Krumlauf said, "It might
make a difference in some cases; it
couldn't hurt It's certainly worth a
,,.

been given fair and prompt trials,
prisoners of conscience - those
who have been imprisoned for their
non-violent protest against human
rights abuses- and prisoners who
are faced with the death penalty,
Robles said.
Both the campus and local
Amnesty groups are now focusing
their energies on the unconditional
release of Tatyana Velikanova, their

this year, was pleased with the re-
sults of the Write-a-thon - the
group had more than 450 letters by
the end of the day. Blatt, who
worked as an intern in Amnesty In-
ternational's Washington D.C. office
last summer, said she hopes the ac-
tivity will help increase awareness of
Amnesty's presence on campus.
"It's a really easy way to do
something," said Ross, a member of

Daily Photo by LISA WAX
LSA sophomore Dara Sanders writes letters to help free prisoners of con-
science at an Amnesty International Write-A-Thon Saturday at the
Michigan Union.

AIPAC
Continued from Page 1

blocking arms sales to countries at
war with Israel.
In her workshop "Issues and An-
swers: Responding to Israel's Crit-
ics," Marla Sanders, a sophomore in
LSA and AIPAC member, said lead-
ers suggested that students should
actively participate in bringing Israel
supporters on campus to speak.
Sanders said the workshop
developed methods of alleviating the
"problems that people have had on
campus when responding to criti-

cism on Israel," such as scheduling
pro-Israeli speakers to precede anti-
Israel speakers, and encouraging stu-
dents to write letters to the editors of
campus newspapers.
Sanders said that in her experi-
ence, AIPAC members have been
treated rudely when questioning anti-
Israel speakers.
Although AIPAC, established in
1979, designed its Political Leader-
ship Development Program to help
build a group of pro-Israel activists,
many who attended the seminar,
such as LSA first year student Todd
Rosenzweig, came simply to
"understand the problems going on
in Israel and how to deal with them."

SCIENCE AND
ENGINEERING
MAJORS!
The Air Force has open-
ings for men and women in
selected science and engineering
j fields. To prepare you for one, you can
apply for an Air Force ROTC scholarship.
See what it can do for you. Contact the cam-
pus Air Force ROTC representative today
CAPT MIKE PHILLIPS
313-747-4093
Leadership Exceence Starts Here
Special Student and Youth Fares to
EUROPE
from New York on Scheduled Airlines!

GE

TCIT!
GUAP1 The Personal Column
MICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS

Infofest
Continued from Page 1
tire. University's library holdings
from their residence halls.
Macadam said the system would
ultimately be available to anyone
with a telephone hookup for their
personal computer.
Also featured at Infofest will be
the CD-ROM system, which uses
ordinary compact discs to store in-
dexes for periodical literature. The
system, similar-to the current Info-
trac computer index system, will be
available in the UGLi at the end of
next summer.
Cass Hartnett, head librarian at
the South Quad library, said the
MIRLIN and CD-ROM systems are
examples of cooperation and ex-
change of materials between the
UGLI and the 11 residence-hall li-
braries.
"There's not a lot of room in our
library to do in-depth research," she
said, explaining that the MIRLIN
and CD-ROM systems will eventu-
ally make it possible for students to

do research without leaving their
dorms.
Infofest will begin at Bursley
Hall and move to Couzens and
South Quad libraries for one day
each during the event. Hartnett said
the libraries were chosen for the size
and location of their residence halls,
and that the event may be repeated in
the fall at other residence hall li-
braries around campus.
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What's
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DESTINATIONS

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Recreational Sports
- INTRAMURAL PADDLEBALL TOURNAMENT
Entries DUE: THURS., MARCH 10 4:30pm
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THE ENERGJZER
A Search for the
Top College
Rock N' Roll Band
Master of Ceremonies:
That outrageous
Aussie - "Jacko"
Special Guest Host and Judge:
MTV V.J. - Kevin Seal
MTV camera crews will
film the event!
Featuring the four top college
bands from the Great Lakes

Now Hiring

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Gain valuable business experience while selling advertising to local and
regional businesses. You'll be responsible for managing your own
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QUALIFICATIONS
" Good organizational skills
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" Positive attitude
" Dependable
" Ambitious
" Ability to work
under stress

RESPONSIBILITIES
" Sell advertising space
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with a variety of person-
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JOB
INFORMATION
Sprina/Summer fall
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2 terms committment 2 terms
100 #accounts 25

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Positions are available for Spring/Summer
terms as a Junior Account Executive. This
is a non-paid position of 5 hours per week.
You'll assist Senior Account Executives,
create ads, wait on walk-in customers, and
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