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March 04, 1988 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-03-04
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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MICH.ELLANY

,qw

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FILM

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0

Hanging
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. -
Ahh. Spring break.
This is good. Real good.
I am stretching out on the beach
with a cute female friend of mine.
She is currently rubbing coconut oil
on my back. "A little to left," I coo
as I sip my pina colada.
We are the only ones out here.
Probably because Michigan is the
only school in the country which
has its spring break in the dead of
winter. I sneered at this last
November. Now, as I glance down
an empty beach with no one in sight
for miles, I smile.
Whoever made out the schedule
knew what they were doing.
"Lets go dancing tonight," I sug-
gest.
She smiles. "Lets," she says.
I am happy. Real happy. As an
old beer slogan once went, does it
get any better than this? A gentle
breeze comes off the ocean and I take
a pregnant pause to contemplate life.
"You know," I tell her as I turn
over and curl my toes toward the
sun, "I think about everything back
at school and it hardly seems as if
the semester has started."
My companion goes to Michigan
as well, and she thinks about what
I've just said. She is confused.

over our

heads

A

'Frantic'

Ford keeps the

e4 1W. JOHN
SH EA
"But..." Her mouth opening as if
some great words of wisdom are
about to flow out of it. I sit up,
waiting for these words to come.
But somewhere between her gut and
her throat the words get lost. "Oh,
never mind," she says. She squeezes
the last drop of coconut oil out of
the bottle and rubs it on my nose.
"All out," she says, throwing the
bottle away.
"I think we need some more," I
tell her.
She hesitates, but with a little
coaxing I convince her to go off and
get another bottle. As she leaves, I
think to myself that I could spend
the rest of my life here; just my
friend and the ocean and the coconut
oil. Life in utopia. No troubles. I
close my eyes and doze off thinking
about it.
Several minutes pass. Then, a
voice crys out my name. "John," the
voice says. "Time to wake up."
"It's about time," I say, turning
over on my belly.

WEEKEND/JESSICA GREENE
Sami Ismail1
Palestinian talks about the PLO's status
and the crisis in the Middle East
INTERVIEW
Sani Ismail is an expert on the Mideast and a professor at Eastern
Michigan University. He spent 10 months in an Israeli jailfor at-
tempting to visit his father in the West Bank. He recently spoke with
Daily Opinion Editor Caleb Southworth.
Daily: What is the PLO?
Ismail: The PLO is a people's organization.
D: Is the PLO a terrorist organization?
I: What we want to let people know is that you cannot accuse an entire
population of being terrorist. The PLO is a peoples' organization which
really commands the respect and support of the vast majority of the
Palestinian people. To equate the PLO with a few people or specific
leaders is a mistake: the PLO is an institution. It has economic, social,
and medical institutions. It has unions of all sorts.
D: Where is the PLO based?
I: Obviously the PLO is not simply an organization based in Lebanon or
Syria or the territories, but it is an idea and a dream that is adopted by
Palestinians everywhere. Even in the United States there are over 100,000
Palestinians who are members of the PLO.
D: Who runs the PLO?
I: Leaders come and go. The PLO has a parliament where Palestinians
debate, struggle with each other politically, and it is the institution with
which Palestinians have opted to express their views.
D: Does the PLO have popular support in the occupied territories?
I: Yes, but within the occupied territories, of course, the support is covert
not open. No one is going to come out and tell you, "I am a member of
the PLO."
D: Are there different factions in the PLO?
I: There are. I am pointing out that the PLO is not a monolithic political
group; its a spectrum. As you have in the United States, we have a
constitution; we have institutions; we have a legal system; we have a
senate; and many different systems. Over the years the PLO remains the
same.
The PLO is a coalition politically and that's why we can claim that the
organization is the representative of the majority of the Palestinian
people.
D: Why don't the Arab governments directly assist in reestablishing
Palestine?
I: The Arab governments feel threatened by the PLO because the PLO is
a democratic organization. If you had an independent Palestinian state, in
addition to just Israel, many Arab governments would feel threatened
because people'ate going to look up to the example of the Palestinians
and say, "Who are the Palestinians? Why can the Palestinians vote?" I had
a Saudi come to me the other day and say, "I envy the Palestinians. They
may be under occupation, but their spirits and souls are free. They are
throwing the rocks; they are not afraid whereas we are sheep, afraid."
See INTERVIEW, Page 9

"We're not here to give you co-
conut oil," another voice says.
Uh-oh. I scramble to my feet. It
is not my female friend, but rather
two stark figures hovering over me.
"Who are you?" I ask.
"I am Aristotle," says one figure.
"And I am Synge," says the
other.
"And we are the Ghosts of En-
glish Past," they chime in unison.
"WHOA," I cry.
Synge wears a quizzical face.
"You do major in English, don't
you?"
"Yeah," I say.
"Just checking," says Aristotle.
"Actually, John, we've noticed that
you've got a midterm on us in a
week or so and we'd like to take you
back and show you how you've pre-
pared for it over the term."
I look around for my female
friend.
"Come with us," says Synge.
"Er, ah, er..." Before I can say
anything, Synge and Aristotle and I
are flying over the ocean, going
back through time. We land at my
apartment.
"This is January," says Synge,
"and there you are, lying on the
couch watching football."
See SHEA, Page 9

audience on

By Steve Knopper
Picture this: You are a mild-,
mannered doctor, traveling to France
with your beloved wife for, a
convention with a bunch of stodgy
medical-types.
Everything goes as planned; you
and your wife settle into an expen-
sive hotel for a comfortable, quiet
evening. Bliss, right?
Perhaps. But, say your wife gets
kidnapped while you shower. Now
what do you do? You don't speak
French, and no one believes you.
The locals think she's having an af-
fair, but you know she's not that
type.
If you're Dr. Richard Walker, you
start doing crazy things. You be-
come Frantic.
In this aptly-named thriller by
Roman Polanski (Chinatown,
Rosemary's Baby), Harrison Ford
plays a desperate man, slowly
unraveling as he traipses Paris in
search of his wife.
As the suburban Walker, some of
Ford's action border on the
unbelievable. He snorts cocaine,
breaks into a pusher's apartment,
discovers a murder, climbs barefoot
on a slippery roof, and puts his trust
in a beautiful, leather- clad female
smuggler.
These are the kinds of things one
just doesn't expect from a typical
American doctor. But Ford's perfor-
mance commands realism as his
personality slowly changes
At first, he calmly dismisses his
wife's absence, and falls asleep with
a medical magazine on this chest.
But, in slow increments, panic sets
in. After a while, he's screaming at
security guards, and visiting the
sleaziest bar in town searching for a
lead.

The Paris background is full of
beautiful people, bright lights, and
appealing advertisements. Ford
opens the film as a distinguished
foreign intellectual with his wife,
but devolves into a harried, frantic
loner. He constantly opens strange
doors, only to find ex)tly what he

seats'

edge
doesn't want, rom murder victims to
ransacked rooms, on the other side.
Polanski clearly had trouble with
the movie's ultimate question: Why?
Why was Walker's wife kidnapped?
Though the answer is anticlimactic,
only a movie as riveting as Frantic
could make it so.

PASSOX
FRIDAY, APRIL 1 FIE
SATURDAY, APRIL 2 SE
There are limited spaces availa
so please make your reservatiom
ABSOLUTE reservation dea
Please call Hillel to reser
GET IT!
TI
Theres only one pr
religions that have all
They don't allow
If you sometimes have questions about Go
come and join the search for answers i
Episcopal Church. The Episcc

Harrison Ford and Emmanuelle Seigner scour Paris for Ford's wife
in 'Frantic.'

OEM

______________________________________________________________________________________ [

OFF THE WALL
Powder skiing is my heroin
-Alta, Utah

SKETC R1?Ab

E ZINN

Reagan is a parasitic scum
(in response)
AND ED MEESE IS A PARASITE
OF A PARASITE
-University of California, Berkeley
God is a mystic creation invented by
those who wish to control men's
minds.
(in response)
A SORRY EXCUSE FOR THOSE
WHO WANT TO BE THEIR OWN
GOD
(in response)
"Religion is the opiate of the masses
in a heartless world"
Karl "The Dude" Marx
-Graduate Library

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or

All, it seems, with good reason.
No one believes him. The hotel's
security, Paris police, and the
American consulate think he's
goofy, especially when he starts
wandering around with this woman
from the dark side.
His new friend, Michele
(newcomer Emmanuelle Seigner,
who exudes a mysterious, sexy ap-
peal), knows the side of Paris
tourists don't see. From a beat-up
Volkswagen bug, she leads him
through the drug-infested, murderous
coffee houses.
The movie is full of clues: A
suitcase, lost by Michele and acci-
dently picked up by Walker's wife, a
matchbook proclaiming an unknown
phone number, and a small, ceramic
Statue of Liberty.
.Polanski effectively portrays
Ford as a stranger in a strange land.

IA RT EXHIBIT"SPECIAL TREATMENT"
PAINTINGS BY MARCIA POLENBERG
MARCH 2 TO TUESDAY MARCH 8
AT -RACKHAM GALLERY
iM ara Polenberg is a graduate studentm
inteMFA progra m
inteU-M School of Art and Architecture.
Hald

2 1N s te
EPISCOPAL E B
T x 218 N . ivison Street o
Ann Arbor, Michigan
CHURCN 48104
-Sunday Sched
At Canterbury House:
Lunch following 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharis
On North Cam s:
2:00 p.m. - iscopal/An can Worship-
unge,Brsley Hall
At Canterbury House:
5:00 p.m. -Holy Eucharist; Supper follow
The Rev. Virginia Peacoc
665-060

President Dole,
President Robertson,
President Bush...
Somebody save us!

- SAB

PAGE 8 WRkKEND/MARCH 5, 1988

WEEKEND/MARCH 5, 1988

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