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March 04, 1988 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-03-04

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 4, 1988- Page 5

Daily Photo by ELLEN LEVY
LSA first-year student Anne Ray protests the South African gover-
nment's ban of 17 anti-apartheid organizations during a candlelight vigil
in the Diag last night.
Students ask U to divest
S. African holdings
(Coatinued from Page 1)
only reason the regents held (the apartheid and the issue of racism on
stock) was to litigate... if the Uni- campus. LSA junior Susan Harvey
versity sells its stock now and the said the University is unconcerned
case is appealed (by the state), the about moral issues and "can't possi-
University may lose its standing in bly be expected to adhere to wishes
court." of divestment."
Power said he would support Speakers called for students to
complete divestment after the case take action in fighting apartheid.
was resolved. -Daily staffer Jim Poniewozik
But students at the vigil accused contributed to this story.
the University of inaction both on
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Peers stress

health awareness

By ALYSSA LUSTIGMAN
Packages of condoms lay scattered
among cookies and juice Wednesday
night as peer educators Mary Beth
Good and Harriet Phinney, graduate
students in the School of Public
Health, discussed safer sex practices
to a group of graduate students at
Vera Baits residence hall.
The discussion is just one of the
University Health Services' Health
Promotion Program series. Health
Services also sponsors workshops
about contraceptive education and
substance abuse. The programs are
all led by students, the majority of
whom are in graduate school.
"Our goal is to get out accurate
and timely information on health is-
sues," said Polly Paulson, the AIDS
education coordinator at Health Ser-
vices who oversees the safer sex
awareness program. "And the best
source of information is probably
when it comes from a peer."
THE PROGRAMS are pre-
sented in residence halls, classes, and
to fraternities or sororities or other
groups upon request. Teams lead the
workshops, which last between one
and two hours.
Rob Johnson, a second year grad-
uate student at the School of Public

Health, stressed the importance of
peer education in the programs.
"It's more effective than having
professionals come in to speak -
especially on sensitive topic areas.
We may sacrifice some expertise,
but it's worth it," he said.
The program, added Johnson, also
develops student leadership.

-started this fall along with the
Substance Abuse Program - at-
tempts to dispel myths about sexu-
ally transmitted diseases like AIDS
while providing up-to-date informa-
tion on safe sex practices.
A contraceptive education pro-
gram, required for all women who
plan to start using prescriptive birth

'We're not advocating sexual activity. We're just trying
to remain neutral, give information, and let people make
their own decisions,'
- Robin Sarris, director of Health Promotion Services.

Promotion Services.
THE LECTURES on contra-
ceptive education are held at Health
Services twice a week.
Elbert explained that peer educa-
tion is important when dealing with
birth control information.
"We want to prove to people that
they don't have to be a doctor to un-
derstand the methods of birth con-
trol. There is no great mystique
about the human body."
THE SUBSTANCE Abuse
Peer Education Program discusses
the use and abuse of alcohol. and
other drugs.
"Alcohol is the primary drug of
choice among college students and
society. More people are addicted to
alcohol than any other drug," said
Teresa Herzog, head of the Substance
Abuse program at Health Services.
Peer educators are picked at the
beginning of the year, and can re-
ceive one credit hour from the
School of Public Health. Educators
for all three workshops undergo
training sessions and need to be
committed for the entire year.

"At the end of the year, there are
15 safe sex educators who are vastly
more informed than they were last
year."
TO LEAD the programs, stu-
dents should be committed to educa-
tion and tolerant of different types of
people, said Shelly Elbert, second
year graduate student at the School
of Public Health and peer coordinator
for the contraceptive education pro-
gram.
The Safer Sex Education Program

control through Health Services,
also seeks to educate students about
sexually transmitted diseases and
various methods of birth control.
"We're not advocating sexual ac-
tivity, we're just trying to remain
neutral, give information, and let
people make their own decisions,"
said Robin Sarris, director of Health

"JOIN THE TEAM OF CALLERS THAT HAS
RAISED OVER $12 MILLION FOR U OF M.
HELP THEM ADD $3 MILLION MORE."

.$4.50-6.501hr. -

-PLUS BONUSES
" FLEXIBLE EVENING HOUR

S}Ii 'N,.,, 'N ' .

Stop by and see a Jostens representative,
Monday, February 29-Friday, March 4,

i

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