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February 29, 1988 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-02-29

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Page 12 -The Michigan Daily-Monday, February 29, 1988

Swimmers successfullyl

defend Big
By STEVE ROEDER
While much of the student body was enjoying the
sun and surf at a southern locale of choice, the
women's swimming and diving teams successfully de-
fended their Big Ten title at Indianapolis.
The Wolverines piled up 720.5 points, far outdis-
tancing Ohio State (523), Northwestern (435), and
Minnesota (379) in the fastest conference meet in his-
tory.
Third-year head swimming coach Jim Richardson's
squad was led by junior All-American Susie Rabiah.
The Flint native won the 50-yard freestyle, placed sec-
ond in the 100, and was third in the 200. Her times in
the 50 and 100 were school records. She was also was a
member of four relays that set school marks.
Rabiah, along with Stefanie Liebner, Jennifer Eck,
and Molly Hegarty, got the Wolverines off to a rousing
start, as they won the meet's opening event, the 4x50
medley relay, shattering the old conference record by
nearly two seconds.
In the meet's final event, the 4x100 free relay, Ra-
biah, Eck, and Liebner were joined by Minno Gupta
and capped off the Wolverine triumph with a first
place. In between, the relay of Rabiah, Eck, Gupta, and
Julie Schnorberger won the 4x50 free relay in a Big
Ten record time.
The convincing win was not solely due to the swim
team, as Dick Kimball's diving sextet dominated both
the 1- and 3-meter boards. Senior Mary Fischbach
soundly defeated all competitors to capture the individ-

Ten title
ual titles on both boards.
Richardson's swimmers were not to be outdone by
Kimball's divers, however. Sophomore transfer
Stephanie Liebner set a new school and Big Ten record
in the 500 free, as she cruised to a NCAA qualifying
time of 4:47.74, bettering the old record by over a sec-
ond. She also qualified in the 100 backstroke and the
200 backstroke. The Ann Arbor native was also a
member of four school record setting relays.
Sophomore Jennifer Eck also qualified for NCAAs
and set a school record in the 100-yard breaststroke.
She also qualified for NCAAs as she placed third in the
200 breaststroke.
Julie Schnorberger set a school record when she
earned the bronze in the 200 IM. Rollins placed 5th in
the 100 breaststroke, 8th in the 200 IM and time trialed
a NCAA-qualifying 200 breaststroke.
Sophomore Ann Colloton posted the most impres-
sive individual swim of the meet when she swam the
fastest time in the nation in the 200 breaststroke. Her
time of 2:16.34 (a school and Big Ten record) outdis,
tanced the field by four seconds. Said Colloton, "The
whole team swam really well. In fact, the whole Big
Ten swam well, which helped us swim even faster."
The Wolverines swam fast, as the times would havs
defeated fifth-rated Clemson and won the ACC Cham1
pionships. They will have 11 swimmers and possiblyi
four divers representing them in Austin later thiE
month at the NCAAs. Colloton said, "If our relays
swim as they did at Big Tens, we have a chance aC
placing in the top five at NCAAs".

Dily rnoto by JUMN MUNSUN
Michigan winger Kent Brothers skates the puck up ice in the early part of last October's game against Bowling
Green. The Falcons split this weekend's series with Michigan, which relegated the Wolverines to-a fifth-place
CCHA finish and a playoff series this weekend at Western Michigan.

Wolverines face

wmU

in league playoffs

From staff reports
In splitting the past weekend's
series against Bowling Green, the
Michigan hockey team finished the
regular Central Collegiate Hockey
Association season in fifth place
with a 17-15 conference record.
The Wolverines will travel to
Kalamazoo to face fourth-place
Western Michigan this weekend in a
best-of-three series.
Saturday the Wolverines fell, 6-1,
to the Falcons at Yost Ice Arena. The
QCHA's leading scorer, Nelson
Emerson, recorded a hat trick to help
Miinch second place for the Falcons,
who finished with a 19-11-2
conference,record. Marc Potvin, Matt
Ruchty, and Chad Arthur also scored
for Bowling Green.
The Falcons found themselves
only one point ahead of third-place
Iichigan State after the Wolverines'
512 victory Friday night at Bowling
Green.
First-year players Don Stone and
Jim Ballantine both scored to offset a
two-point night for Emerson, who
was CCHA Newcomer-of-the-Year
!last season. Stone scored the winning
goal at 3:26 of the third period and

Ballantine scored Michigan's first
shorthanded goal since December in
the middle of the second period to put
the Wolverines within one point of
Western Michigan going into
Saturday's action.
A Michigan win on Saturday:
coupled with a Western loss would
have allowed the Wolverines to host
a CCHA playoff series for the first
time in Michigan history. The,"
Wolverines instead must travel to
Lawson Ice Arena in Kalamazoo,
where they have won only once in
the past five seasons.
The winner of the series will
travel to Joe Louis Arena March 5
for the semifinals of the CCHA
conference tournament.
Other first-round playoff matchups
include Ohio State at division-
winning Lake Superior, Ferris State
at Bowling Green, and Illinois-
Chicago at Michigan State.
Michigan last year lost to NCAA-
finalist Michigan State in the first
round of the CCHA playoffs. The
scores were 8-7 and 6-3.

DON WALAIA
TO SEE
'N RP A nV!oed'yJhnWtr
SCREAMINGLY
FUNNY!"............
-BIlLL COSFORD, MIAMI HERALD :. : ::::::!t::::
"OUTRAGEOUS!"
- BRUCE WILLIAMSON, PLAYBOY MAGAZINE
A ew comedy by John Waters
Get Back to Your Roots!
NEW LINE CINEMA PRESENTS IN 4SSocIToN wim STANLEY F. BUCHTHAL AROBERT SHAE PIRODITuw "HAIRSPRAY" sTARRiNc SONNY BONO
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STARTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26TH!

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IM hockey playoffs
being held at Yost
By JUDY DROZ
Intramural hockey league playoffs
currently are being.-played at Yost Ice
Arena.
- IM hockey is divided into two
leaigues, the recreational and the
competitive. There isn't a major dis-
tiniction between the two leagues
except that the former is more fun
while the latter is more aggressive.
Most of the teams in both leagues
are sponsored by fraternities, said an
IM official.
These 24 teams each pay $250 to
play four games during the regular
season in addition to being guaran-
teed two playoff appearances. The
teams are broken down into cate-
gories ranging from best to worst
depending on their season results.
Those categories are broken down
into six brackets, which determine
the pairings for the post-season
tournament..
Jeff Schlussel, who plays for Zeta
Beta Tau, said he does it for the ex-
excise, competition, and fun.
"After coming from playing for
15 years of competitive hockey, it's
refreshing to be able to play at a
similar level."

MEGILLAH READING SERVICE
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2 7PM AT THE MICHIGAN UNION, PENDELTON ROOM
(NOT QUITE TRADITIONAL)
I 7PM AT THE FRIENDS MEETING HOUSE
(TRADITIONAL)a/
Please dress for the occasion. ' t(
PURIM BASH'88
g/ Y WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2
9PM MICHIGAN UNION, BALLROOM
Featuring The Blue Meanies, Michigan's hottest dance band. Outrageous
costumes are in order. Purim drinks and munchies.
$2 w/costume $3 w/out costume
Ililki

:44I '4
2
H

Announcing:
The English Composition Board's
WRITING WORKSHOP
AFTER HOURS:
WINTER 1988
In addition to the daily Writing Workshop at 1025 Angell
Hall, the English Composition Board provides Writing
Workshop services for undergraduates in their Residence
Halls (Alice Lloyd, Bursley-Baits, Mary Markley and West
Quad), and Writing Workshop conferences will also be
available in the Undergraduate Library. Like the main
workshop, the Writing Workshop After Hours provides
assistance on all aspects of the writing process (from
discovery to grammar to revision) on LS&A course papers
and on personal writing projects. The Writing Workshop,
however, is not a proofreading service.
Students who write using a word processor can bring their
disks with them to the UGLI on Sundays, since the
Workshop will have access to both IBM and Macintosh
microcomputers there.
At West Quad, students may sign up for half hour appoint-
ments at the main desks. Other sites operate on a walk-in
basis. Walk-in appointments are also welcome at West
Quad, schedule permitting.

UIC's
Consider the benefits of your MBA
from UIC.
A program that works with you:
Gain management experience
FABwhiie earning a salary through
co-op. You'll enhance your resume and
you could land a great job. Excellent teaching
and research in 11 concentrations comple-
ment your co-op learning experience.
A dynamic location for learning and*
living: Chicago's exciting business environ-
ment is in our front yard-and our backyard.
Our campus is easily accessed by car and
public transportation.

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