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February 18, 1988 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-02-18

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Page 8-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, February 18, 1988
Comedy is
jester of O
the real story here is M
(Contimed fomPage1) man. His riveting portra
I have not heard of Kirkland be- Black, a New York City
fore today; this probably does not the-edge," was a diamon
bode well for her chances. Ironweed that was otherwise a turd
was only nominated for two awards (with Christopher Reev
- Nicholson and Streep. They both leased last March and sta
come across like bums on a street atres for two weeks. Thr
corner, begging for an Oscar. They the Academy for both re
will be passed by. They should be him and overlooking th
INTERESTING omissions film was far inferior t
include both Lillian Gish and Bette formance.
Davis of The Whales of August. DISAPPOINTING
Favorite elders of the industry are include Peter O'Toole o
almost always honored with a Emperor.
nomination, regardless of whether
the performance was worthy of one. Best Supporting Actre
Disappointing omissions include Norma Aleandro, Gab
Christine Lahti for Housekeeping Story
and Emily Lloyd for Wish You Were Anne Archer, Fatal At
Here. Olympia Dukakis, Mo
Ann Ramsey, Throw1
Best Supporting Actor: the Train
Albert Brooks, Broadcast News Ann Sothem, The Wh
Sean Connery, The Untouchables gust
Morgan Freeman, Street Smart
Vincent Gardenia, Moonstruck Again, as in the supp
Denzel Washington, Cry Freedom category, the big surprise
one unexpected and wa
While Brooks and Connery will comed nominee. Ramsey
likely be the favorites in this race, stunning surprise becaus

4

no

longer

the

scar's

court

organ Free-
yal of Fast
pimp "on-
d in a film
d. The film
e) was re-
ayed in the-
ee cheers to
membering
he fact the
to the per-
omissions
of The Last
ess:
by-A True
traction
oonstruck
Mama from
hales of Au-
porting actor
e here is the
armly wel-
was such a
se the com-

edy (cursed!) got weak reviews and
only fair box-office; a combination
which seldom equates into nomina-
tions. Another diamond is found,
this time in a comic turd which is
even more of an accomplishment.
Dukakis (cousin to Mike) must
be considered the favorite in an oth-
erwise weak category. Her shrewd
performance not only outshines
them all, but can also be seen by
more Academy members as it is not
stuck in limited release (read: Whales
of August, Gaby). Archer can't win
because she doesn't have enough
screen time and is too much of a
mantle piece.
DISAPPOINTING omissions
include Barbara Hershey of Tin Men.
Best Director:
Bernardo Bertolucci, The Last
Emperor
John Boorman, Hope and Glory
Lasse Hallstrom, My Life as a
Dog
Norman Jewison, Moonstruck
Adrian Lyne, Fatal Attraction
Best Picture:
Broadcast News
Fatal Attraction
Hope and Glory
The Last Emperor
Moonstruck
IF YOU THINK about it, the
categories of best picture and best
director belong together. Logic says
that if a film is good enough to be
nominated for best picture, than it's
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director must have had something to
do with it. Bertolucci, Boorman,
Jewison, and Lyne were all recog-
nized along with their respective
pictures, but James L. Brooks was
somehow left off the director's list
in spite of Broadcast News' nomina-
tion for best picture (Brooks was
nominated for Best Original Screen-
play).
Steven Speilberg also found
himself off the list; for him, it is the
second such disappointment in the
past three years. Despite 11
nominations for 1985's The Color
Purple, Speilberg was snubbed. This
year, Empire of the Sun garnished
six nominations; however, none
were in a major category.
Disappointing omissions in this
category include Stanley Kubrick for
Full Metal Jacket, John Huston
(posthumously) for The Dead , and
Barry Levinson for Tin Men.
THE NOMINEES for best
picture hit all ends of the spectrum,
from the trashy thrillers to the full-
blown epics. While the Academy has
acknowledged the success of Fatal
Attraction, it is unlikely the still-
very-conservative organization will
bestow the Oscar to Adrian Lyne's
production. Instead, the accom-
plishments of Bertolucci, in filming
the first full-length feature film in
China with The Last Emperor, will
be rewarded with "film's biggest
prize."
An interesting omission for best
picture is Woody Allen's Radio
Days.
In the "It serves you right to get
shafted because you spent all year in
limited release and no one could see
you" category are five films, any one
of which could have been worthy of
a nomination for best picture: House
of Games, Nuts (sorry, Barbara),
Housekeeping, The Dead and Cry
Freedom. Studios took the calculated
error of holding back on these films,
keeping them in limited release -
playing in a handful of major cities
- to build up word of mouth. The
intent was to earn a slew of
nominations and then go into major
release triumphantly carrying Oscar
banners. Too bad it backfired.
But that's another story. As a
great philosopher once said, every-
one can't win. Somebody has to to
get the royal Academy shaft. So
what are the best performances and
films of the year? You decide. The
Academy decides April 11.
-The Associated Press con-
tributed to this story.
THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557

Barrence to the bone
Barrence Whitfield and his wild band, the Savages, were joined
onstage by George Thorogood andkThe Delaware Destroyers during an
encore at their rowdy, blues rockin' throwdown performance Tuesday
night at the Blind Pig. If you missed this impromptu jam session you
can see Thorogood and his band at Hill Auditorium Friday night.
Unfortunately you won't be able to see Barrence.

4

Records

Peter Broggs
Cease the War
RAS Records
On Cease The War, Peter Broggs vaults to the forefront of the
rugged new R&B (Reggae & Blues) movement. From mojo-blazin'
harmonica solos to Broggs' omniscient lyrical and vocal presence, this
album is the most powerful roots-conscious reggae voyage since Bob
Marley and The Wailers' glory years.
Singing as if tears are streaming down his face, Broggs intimately
laments the indigent youth, South Africa's oppressive apartheid regime,
and the civil strife in Nicaragua. His quiet-storm fusions of intuitive
country-blues smarts with beefy basslines and intricate reggae rhythms
are laced with a dark, restive immediacy.
Although Broggs occasionally strays from sensitive idealism into
iconoclastic disparity, the majority of the time he holds his soul-torch
with astute and provocative confidence. "Don't Let The Children Cry"
is an inspiring song reminding society to care for the impoverished
youth of today, for "they are the heirs of the world." Broggs stirs the
embers with his husky street-bellowing while the snazzy roots-rhythm
horn section delicately kisses the brisk reggae harmony.
"Mister Sheriff Man" and "Freedom for the People" are apocalyptic
rushes of icy guitar stabs and growling Delta blues gut-spilling. On
these tunes, Broggs consoles the cries of the oppressed with a warm
blanket of love-defender vocals. The title cut is Broggs' plea for global
peace accentuated by Andy Bassford's jagged, gunshot guitars and a
firing squad of harmonica, bass, and congos. The artillery-strewn
rhythm is symbolically quelled by Broggs' soft, peaceful warbling.
In essence, Cease The War is a spiritual and musical exploration
that attempts to encompass the emotional pain'present throughout the
world. But has Broggs attempted to do too much on one project? On
the contrary, Broggs is articulate, and has insight into the racial and
political turbulence that has buried the repressed people of South Africa,
Nicaragua, and the United States.
Peter Broggs' raspy blues crooning and lush, luminescent poetry has
injected reggae music with fresh life, as Cease The War stands as an
album of hope, love and inspiration that will not be forgotten.
- Todd Shanker

4

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j Chicago Audition Feb. 29 / Call 1-800-367-7908 I

"IAN EXCITING ADVENTURE! "

4

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