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February 17, 1988 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-02-17

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, February 17, 1988- Page 11

Adam's Rib
BY ADAM SCHRAGER

Eastern's shady dealings
draw no legal attention

Eastern Michigan's Associate Athletic Direc-
tor John Nordlinger received a car in exchange for
giving out property that was not his. So what?
Who cares? That question is so far unanswered.
Since the publicizing (Feb. 8 Michigan Daily)
of Nordlinger's possible violation of the Michi-
gan conflict of interests law (Article Four-Sec-
tion Ten of the Michigan Constitution), there
have been no repercussions.
According to the former sales manager of the
Davis Buick-GMC-Nissan dealership, Nordlinger
gave the use of the Eastern Michigan football fa-
cilities, logos, and uniforms to the car dealership
for a television commercial in return for his own
personal Buick Skylark.
The Michigan Attorney General in 1968 said
that a "conflict of interests exists where a public
official places himself in a position where he
must decide whether to advance his personal in-
terest or interest of the public."
BECAUSE NORDLINGER'S possible
conflict of interests does not violate National
Collegiate Athletic Association rules, there have
been no investigations by its committees or
those of the Mid-American Conference to which
Eastern belongs. The Michigan state authorities
will not investigate the situation because it is
"the institution's job to investigate first,"
according to Assistant Attorney General Paul
Zimmer.
So on to the institution where the situation is
being handled as delicately as a pancake on the
wrong side of the pan. Eastern Michigan Director

of Communications Kathleen Tinney responded
to the allegations by saying, "We did not feel
that there was any impropriety on our part."
Thus, no one is going to investigate this po-
tential violation of the law. Great. Even though
the law is extremely detailed and seems to relate
to the situation, I guess the no autopsy, no foul
rule is in effect.
THE LAW, Section Two-Paragraph Four of
the No. 196 Public Act of Michigan, effective as
of Jan. 8, 1974, reads as follows: "A public offi-
cer or employee shall not solicit or accept a gift
or loan of money, goods, services, or other thing
of value for the benefit of a person or organiza-
tion, other than the state, which tends to influ-
ence the manner in which the public officer or
employee or another public officer or employee
performs official duties."
Not being Perry Mason, I cannot say whether
John Nordlinger violated this law, but common
sense shows that there is some correlation be-
tween the two.
The question of whether Nordlinger can be
considered an employee of the state needs to be
answered. The question of whether Nordlinger
contradicted the Michigan attorney general's
statement in 1968 needs to be answered. There
are a lot of questions to be answered.
But these unanswered questions have no one
to answer them. No committees, no investiga-
tions, no questions asked. Everything is being
swept under the rug as if nothing was ever said.
WHILE THIS NONCHALANCE may

seem strange and unusual, this type of situation
happens all the time, according to Michigan As-
sistant Athletic Director Will Perry.
"Don (Canham, Michigan Athletic Director)
doesn't have a car or a country club member-
ship," said Perry. "He turned it all down. He
doesn't need it and he doesn't want it. But you
would be kidding yourself if you didn't believe
that it was going on all over the country.
"There have already been many colleges that
have gotten in trouble for this type of situation
and if everything was revealed I'm sure that there
would be a lot more trouble."
But nothing will be revealed in this case due
to the present power and influence of college
athletics at Eastern. After coming off its best
football season in its 95 years of existence and a
California Bowl victory, as well as a prospering
basketball team, the Eastern athletic department
is steadily rising.
Eastern is currently out of the shadow of its
Washtenaw county rival, Michigan. The question
that must be crossing the minds of Eastern fol-
lowers is, "Why ruin this up-and-coming athletic
department that now has national notoriety?"
No, let's forget the fact that this situation is a
possible violation of the law. After all, it is a
measly college newspaper that printed the story.
No one will listen to them.
And at the present time, they are right, no one
has.

Downhill from here -**iat Prss
Switzerland's Pirmin Zurbriggen, atop the world after winning a gold
medal in Olympic downhill skiing Monday, is shown here trying for
another. He won the downhill portion of the men's combined yesterday.

Athlete who idolized Bias dies

FORESTVILLE, MD. (AP) A
suburban Washington, D.C. high
school on Tuesday mourned the
death of football star Rico Leroy
Marshall - a senior who idolized
} Len Bias and faced an athletic career
just as promising until apparent
involvement with drugs took his to
the same end as his hero.
Many students at Forestville'
High School were in tears on their
first day of school since Marshall's
death Saturday.
Normally raucous groups o f
students were silent. Counselors
stood by to talk about the tragedy to
any student or faculty member who
needed them.
Marshall's family continued to
deny their son was involved in
drugs, despite the story of a
girlfriend who said that hours before
he died he said he swallowed six
chunks of crack to hide them from
police and despite his arrest in
December for possession with intent
to distribute cocaine.
Marshall, 18, appeared to have
everything going for him.
A record-setting running back, he
signed a letter of intent last

Wednesday to attend the University
of South Carolina. The next night
he won a school talent contest for
his singing.
South Carolina football coach Joe
Morrison said he was shocked by the
news of Marshall's death, according
to Sports Information Director Kerry
Tharp.
When asked if he would award a
scholarship to a student with a record
of drug use or dealing, he said he
would not, Tharp told The
Washington Post.
"I can't believe that he was
involved with drugs," said his
mother, Carolyn Marshall. "If it
comes down to the stories being
true, it will really shock me. It
really will devastate all of us."
Toxicology tests to determine the
cause of death were expected to be
complete by Friday.
The Marshalls live in the
Glenarden Apartments, in a
notorious drug dealing area of the
county. But his family said he
wasn't a part of the trafficking that
surrounded him.
"He hated it here," said his
mother in an interview with the

Prince George's Journal. "He knew a
couple of little guys around here
who are into drugs and he tried to get
them to straighten up."
Marshall's bedroom is decorated
with his football jerseys, dozens of
trophies, and newspaper clippings
highlighting his athletic career. A
Time Magazine cover of Len Bias
with the headline "The death of the
dream" is among the posters on his
wall.
"He met Len Bias before, and
when he died it tested him so bad,"
friend Rodney Simms, 19, of
Marshall. "He just couldn't
understand how it could happen."
Bias, a basketball star from the
University of Maryland, died June
19, 1986, from cocaine intoxication
two days after signing to play with
the Boston Celtics.
Simms said if Marshall did have
drugs and saw police coming he
rmight have panicked.
"If he had something like that he
knew he couldn't get caught with
it," said Simms.
According to police reports,
Marshall's girlfriend, Belinda Hill,
said Marshall picked her up at 2:15

similarly
a.m. Saturday and told her he had
swallowed the drugs when he saw
two uniformed officers approaching
him about an hour earlier on a street
known for drug transactions.
On Dec. 22, at the same location,
police said they arrested Marshall. A
minor at the time, he was charged
with possession with intention to
distribute cocaine after police found
29 grams of the cocaine derivative
crack on him in 66 plastic bags.
Police sources, quoted by the
Journal, said he was released to the
custody of his parents after receiving
a reprimand and probation from a
community arbitrator in the Juvenile
Services Unit.
His father Leroy Marshall denies
knowing about the arrest.
Forestville High School Principal
Paul Lewis said Tuesday he wished
he had known.
He said Marshall was one of his
favorite students.

141

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