100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 17, 1988 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Bomb scare
disrupts
classes
atMLB
(Continued from Page 3)
Linderman was unsure what
course of action he would take with
regard to the exam; he may design a
make up. But, he added, "Students
should have a pleasant recess and
we'll take up the issue after break."
Gina O'Donnell, who was in her
French 231 class between 11 and 12,
said she was not informed of the
bomb threat until after her class had
already ended. "There is no way to
determine whether or not a bomb
threat is (actually) serious or not,"
she said, referring to public safety's
decision not to evacuate the building.
Leo Heatley, director of the Uni-
versity's department of public safety,
was unavailable for comment.
Members of the University's
women's soccer team, who were
selling donuts, coffee, and juice in-
side the MLB, took everything in
stride. Team member and first-year
nursing student Meribeth Rains said
they moved their stand outside be-
tween Burton Tower and the MLB
from 11:15 to noon.
- Daily staffer Melissa Ramsdell
contributed to this report

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, February 17, 1988 - Page 7
Town discusses environmental
impact of future super collide r

(Continuedfrom PageS)
Jayne said the collider's path would
be directly below her house. "I'm for
it, as long as it goes under your
house; unfortunately, it goes under
mine," she said. Jayne, like several
other residents, expressed concern
that radiation from the collider might
contaminate her water supply.
But Diebold said radiation would
be prevented from coming to the
surface by protective shields and by
the depth of the ring.
The collider, if built at other
sites, would be at least 30 ft. deep. If
built at Stockbridge, Diebold said, it
would be an average of 140 ft. deep,
further decreasing the safety risk.
University Physics Prof.
Lawrence Jones, who has helped
design the collider, said in terms of
environmental dangers, "It sounds
too simple to say there are none, but
it's true." Jones said the radiation

given off by the collider will be
roughly the same amount emitted by
the University hospital.
Provost and Vice President for
Academic Affairs James Duderstadt
spoke on behalf of the University at
a public comments session.
Duderstadt said the University
would create new faculty positions
for scientists visiting the facility and
said University professors and
students would help design the
collider if it were built in Michigan.
Dick Howlett, a member of the
Stockbridge Village Council, said,
"We need the diversification (the
SSC) can bring. We can no longer
depend on the auto industry and
farming...
"I really do not think it would
change the Stockbridge community
that much." The Stockbridge Village
Council unanimously endorsed the
collider project.

"I'm all for it. I think it would be
great for the community," said
Lansing resident Larry Grades.
The collider will create more than
3,000 construction jobs and 2,500
permanent jobs. Also, up to 500
visiting scientists from around the
world could work at the facility at
any given time.
Proponents of the Stockbridge
site have said the town is the perfect
location for the collider because of
its close proximity to the University
of Michigan, Michigan State
University, and Detroit Metropolitan
Airport, as well as its extensive
water supplies and low chance of
earthquakes.
Ernest Lutz, who lives near the
city of Mason and whose home is
located within the proposed 53-mile
ring, said,"I think it should go irx
Stockbridge. We have the resources;
the people, and the skills."

U.S. Blkacks
kack power,
speaker
says

(Continued from Page 3)
America be as enthusiastic about
Africa as Zionists in America are
enthusiastic about Israel," he said.
Ture said students must
consciously organize and advance the
cause of the African people.
Organization is the key for
movements of the 1980's to correct
the errors of the 1960's, Ture said.
The "unconscious" masses of the
'60s were mobilized by an

"instinctive love of justice" but were
not properly organized, he said.
Ture spoke in an often fiery
manner. Called once "the most
charismatic figure" in the Black
movement, Ture lectured in an
involved and passionate way. He
sometimes slipped back and forth
between accents that reflect his West
Indies birth, his New York City
upbringing, and his current status as
a citizen of Guinea, West Africa.

Paczki mania -Asociated Press
Hungry customers line up for paczki, a traditional jelly-filled Polish
pastry, which Kristina Acovski serves up at the New Palace Bakery in
Hamtramck, Mich. The day before Ash Wednesday, many Catholics treat
themselves to sweets before giving them up for the 40 days of Lent.

Radical prof. blasts

2 - - * -2 -

(Continued trm Page 1)
Educated as an undergraduate at Williams
College in Massachusets where he served
as president of his fraternity and as a
graduate student at Harvard University,
Anderson was a "pretty mainstream"
economist. And after a few years of
teaching at the University, he was tapped
to be on the staff of President John
Kennedy's Council of Economic Advisors.
"IT WAS my first contact with the big
time," Anderson recalled.
"You see some pretty important people,"
and ride in White House limousines and
"it makes it easy to think what you're
doing has cosmic importance," said
Anderson, who looks back critically at
himself as a sometimes "vain" young
gunner.
After this one year stint in the capital, .
Anderson returned to the University in
1965, but still served as a consultant until
1967.
$3ut with the rise of student activism, his
disillusionment with the Vietnam war, and
the encouragement of a few radical graduate
students who took a liking to him,
Anderson began his turn, to left-wing
politics.

AROUND the same time, the irreverent
Anderson began to emerge, according to
professor emeritus Dan Fusfeld.
The bad boy of the economics depart-
ment began to become more outwardly
outspoken, rebellious, and spontaneous., A
self-described iconoclast - one who goes
against mainstream beliefs - Anderson
became a radical with a biting sense of
humor that has struck some as lovably
irreverent and some as caustic and
curmudgeonly. His actions exemplify the
slogan on his "Fuck Authority" tee-shirt.
"Over the years, there's a certain spirit,
an aura Locke has put forth - a sardonic
attitude he had, still has, and will take to
the grave," Johnson said.
"He wasn't just a cut-up, (he wasn't) the
(John) Belushi character in Animal House;
he just had a particular attitude about what
life is all about,"Johnson said.
"It's just my way," Anderson explained
simply.
OVER THE years, many people and
institutions have been targets of Anderson
irreverence.
When Fusfeld was temporarily denied
professor emeritus status last summer for
calling the regents "stupid" in 1980,
Anderson wrote to The Ann Arbor News

and decide
off. In a le
wrote, "O
they areI
vicious as
Saying1
versity go
ners of the
"that our
Anderson
photogenic
the.next re
Anderso
never ris
Bassman,t
who Ande
Dwight Ei
aspire to-
noted.
HOWE
been focus
reputed th
economics
scholars w
points of d
essentially
who's gott
Anderso
added, "It'
(something

authority, Esta
Md to pick up where Fusfeld left His turn to radicalism and his manner
tter published May 21, Anderson have surprised many people, who had no
f course, they are stupid... And idea what this former Establishment figure
petty, provincial, myopic and had become.
well." A few years ago, he was invited to be the
he would rather have the Uni- distinguished visiting professor at Texas
verned by the most recent win- Christian University because one of the
state lottery than by the regents faculty at TCU read a book he had written
electoral process turns up," in a less radical period of his life.
also added, "If I were more OF COURSE, "when I got there, I
c from the rear, I would 'moon' wasn't what they expected at all."
gents meeting." "The distinguished professor turns out to
)n did note, however, that he has be a Marxist, wears jeans and workshirts,
en to the height of Robert regularly uses profanity, and is picked up
the Purdue University economist twice in the first ten days for vagrancy" on
rson said once mooned President account of his appearance, he said.
senhower. "That's something to Anderson may appear out of place in his
- mooning the president," he environments because he's admittedly full
of the contradictions brought about by the
EVER, his criticisms haven't combination of Marxist beliefs, elite
sed solely on the politicians. It is education, and relatively mainstream
hat Anderson stood up at one upbringing.
s department seminar and told For example, "I would cheerfully, indeed
ho were vigorously arguing over with rapture in my heart, throw a bomb
doctrine that their argument was into the White House," he explained. "But
petty and, "You're arguing over I would never cheat on my income taxes."
the bigger (genital)." Being a Marxist and living well in a
an could not recall this story, but capitalist society presents another contra-
s probably true because I've done diction for Anderson.
g like) that often." THE MOST contradictory thing

ishment
Anderson said, is that he grew up in very
comfortable circumstances, enjoys reading
and listening to sophisticated music, and at'
the same time, realizes such is the pos-
session of a small minority.
"There's a real contradiction between
enjoying intellectual pleasures and over-
turning the world, because overturning the
world means overturning the people I like
to talk to," he said.
Anderson is not comfortable at the
'Jniversity.
"I decided I couldn't stand it here any
more," he said, citing the "dreary sameness
of the department" as one of his reasons for
retiring.
"It's really stultifying to live in a situ-
ation where the only people you meet
regularly are overeducated," he said. "You
can't smell your own breath, because ev-
erybody's breath smells like yours."
SO AFTER teaching a course spring
term, Anderson will head off to Harlem, a
place he has visited several times.
"He's learned to be comfortable in
Harlem, which is not an easy thing for a
white academic to do," said Beth Reed,
Anderson's lover and future Harlem
roommate.,

.. ...
..., ....... ,. " E .:' .. ~<.
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . ..... . .... . .......... .. .. .rx r^ . w . . d4 e a>_x Ma , r? , .... { . . °. M z~A"x3 _ E ex x . K [,
"e"C!+ , g-. .. .. ?. : .< s + x,,+;r.:. ..,. , -, .:+ r.,..x la ,. tr"p Q «.. .. i.'- V ,v'e.:...3. ' "k . « .. , v . , .v. "..xr5' ::k ".b '. k.r. 1. Ir C ,y{r ..fS
.., ...... I .. -3 .. .. j - xt.a W a. w:, .:r:, ,.
.... .... .......... . .,. .r . : >..,' ..^ ." i . :_ . . . Y t s':a: , u . ': w, < 'F, Fu
.. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . _ ..... r ,
.........Tx: 'Y.' n F x e .. t . .:. ,.:+, : « ..::..... «,, ., e , P i Y r A S ' ik2
........ -.... 4.rk# ..- , ,,:-:,:", , , .,' s . a ..,th
. .. ... ..s:°.:.: . .' # 'x'". A .. rv .. r $ Y -Y .. ... .. ... ... ........ .. . .... ttz:r .Y'x .4'.
', , t.. 's..^, 'mr " tx. ta.- # ..' r n. ..
......... %i .. y.. x.:.a . .. < x q., ,.,..::1 r. « a*. r 'eL #s'" 4 ..
.... ............ .. .... ... L f , w e ,...y ,,..,r.vx .. «v
~. . . . . ..x. ..,.'r: I:.,,^:..,.^^a. .a
. . . . . . .. , . . . . . . . . . . ,+
... ... .. ... .-. .. v r-
... .. .. .. ... ... ...... .. .. . .-.a . .,.:.r r .r.v, , r . n.,, ". ,.- .:A .rv'., I S' 4, w5.a fli, V 4 .i ^ti' i4' .'...
... ... .... .. { ... s , . .* :. .. t ..,:sv , ^ ,. . « m-, r , , , a. ..... - « :_. , :# , ^bm r ,e.v"xx ? . ,- . , ,. ,n e.....
.., ,. " o- .ti .,: +..r a -:n n. , n a a . a.. .. . r.. =. , s . , 4. k--.. ., O ,.
.«, ._ «:.. r .; .,,r 3T r : . r r . r -.m , a.,. t. -.. -. :::s *+'w . ,: .
.".......... . ........ t.-x .,. r::.. -_=W -A -x -+.s-. H'... - ,, r, a -er. ,, x 4 , _ .. .. . .,-.e :..-r. a ., a,,,..,..: «.. ,.... .. x 4 -. z x+ Fa..- k t.- ,a2ds
.. -. t - _ *, t:. . -k. d-,s s'",-. r a... a.:" _: 11 ;I « -.. ., :; .. " + , , Via: " - .._,.,-,.,,,, <.:..,...M... ..a. I w ... :rl§:o -
::: :: : ......... . k " a y:- z ^r rr:" w t , t" '.t".s- i-r4 +' W^ a +rx+F c'*g t :. w , s....>.- - . ".:.P,,.. , , ......
.'. :" ": <,: T he: ..:.': :.' : :.. ....'iii. ..... . ,,:::::.. .. ... >>. .. - .> . ::: :. : '. : .;.
' D f
:oh an ail benterv ewin +cand ates for the s t ors
.
..:. us_ ess_ _ a _ a er, Th.s: .. on. ho d t . e ht . .
:.. ' ..:. ..B in M an 1 h hest an mast
. . .
..,. '......, ..': }.. .... :'' .'.'. :', ' :is .'.':1 <f :- 'a '. '.' .'.' '. .a . . .n
s _ ASS :.
re onstble oslt on in he IIIItGhI an Datl: U n
:' <' >
..
.. ': ..'.': i.r a k. s^' x +a'Ar.- ,. g'''"rk° . }«<.b ..
art .... . m . . . o eras- ..
.r r. de a meat and :monitQrs
u,. Me,.. ., x-..rv. ... . :
kY. ,i , k«M1 v YR F " . ...< ::: " .
......... .... .. xX>_ .. ...
'4 . T .. , M ..... .. i .Y .. .. .6 .. ... ... . . . ... _ _ _
. . . . . . . . .. . . ,,. .
rk'Sa.n.._t,4 .r px-.gym .. i <x fi r.. A+ .y .. . . . . ...... _
- T - vta. X.1.... . .... ..
4 ,M vfi X . :':
. . . . . . . . . . . r wY n::add tfan a been he ha rman of he: Sen4Q u .
r B sinessStaff :an. d a :::::
.... . q :.::.:...: .:.
t .a. . . . . .... . .. . .... >:::
.K.. e"Y t: k v
.. f+y.i.aruii a "S t! Y. .. rd
....... ..."." ... i ¢! :ymP *T r ... r r.. 'zaPx .. ..
...,...... hx .r..:.. 4':--v ..... ... ..
......... ... .. ... ci.4.w . X - . y.. 4F rA tS: <y......ei'; a > "j .f: .. ,.... .':. . : . .. .' a , t .n
I .Y . t .... . . on r of n m rn r a t . Cie
_.., a
" C 1 a-
u Ys._,. a,. .r
R":
. C r +.r. , y r ;' : z r rx'a n r Y.,-. f . "
.. : .. ' '.'t:} 13w. i- ... aY 3. , .A f1'r t i ,t"!-- +n:4c.. .: .., , n 4 ..' ' _ . .
.. .. .... ..... ., .. , d u t e s :n c Iu e . ::::
.... .. . yx r x e r , r,:a. d 4 l .t'. .iS l; i# :: .'.".
...::, .... ..« .o-.,4 , y*
r' ,. z . .,, ?RXi er. ': i
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . , ,; ,., n -
;4. P N .,..3 j ,.r-.rp,..
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 , ,. ar'.". .
t 7 . , rr (,
""I, ,r l Sn p,,
.. ..f i.,.. -...... x n. . , ..t , ;Y, l 3
. . . .. . . . . .... . .. .... ,. ....1.. 3 f x tw.,H ..F. > .. . .. . ..
... I - - . . f -, '.'.1; .Y f f.;- P11i. : ,f f i a.a . .. ..-. . .. .. . .. . . .. . .. . .. . . .'. . .. . .. . . .. . ...'.- .. . . .. . . .
....... ...... .. x -rsf r - ,ly,.. - :R .
:. i:: i. ; ,...,. :.: y Atl %'-,x .k:,rr rs....
is :'.;.;:.' .. ; :. .,. .. "n..l, r-r {:.. S: i.". t+'' r Xr Ft;Ynr.,}i :.... ':.. : : ,: ''" , 1 $ -
TI , r it
... rY: r :rt P .^Y{"i. ..
::..." .. , it .' i' r ti"1 11 '1 :. ...... .. _ , .
,r . .
. . . . .., , , . .
t.: ?. :. :ii::4?: ;.};'. c.,.
:::::::' :::::;.::: , . . . _ lane a ent of a Q l11'late vou [ em o eea t .. Cde art. is . :
' ..: .. :::.:.::., : .... . . .. .... .- . : . . ............. ... '
,
/ [/((y id\?: :r. I . .n . :': tl "R +s , '. "' ,': : .'
' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
;.,' :,.:.:' .,. }:.:.?iri? :' Gii7.: :'; } .. v:: i re. .a'rat 'o n': f a . ell :cost":'anal.'. .'s. s.! an. . ; Prof ttab l ._ ... ,. i'. . pon s
. . : : 1
is r. : 1.
, .,: .. -, li Resol ut on of . C. yen.. ab e .. .
. :
.. . :.''.' ,t . :. .
I n :n er-staff :r elatiQns
Mantenaic o sou d f
" ''
w, _.. "."
......., 3 4 "
r a '198
{A.i.r"ne con mitment. _ninim urn5 hours a week a
., . . __
: '::
y{% ry,
,r ) o r s
11 ti BusinessfLib ': a ?arts rn ore referred all rna ass :4c n e e _ _ __ .
.: , ,'.'. :'.. tier.,, .... ~ .. _ .;....,.. , ,. .
S Y. .11
,.....
r forma l tnter.V.i'e , r u:.re . : _
.. ... , , .. rr ... n Y m tl w'frx .-t. xG1... +'. ... - . - ..... .'.'.
.... .. ............ .V'%- _
w.. { Y xa ik i .'"
E} e :nv'G.
k ?Y1 T-
H.
. . . . . . . . . . . . A t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . .. . .
..I-:,:::::::%:::
... .... ..... m tl. .,.-fbr4 1.« .... .. ....
. . :o-...:. , aP ..., . .... ,...- ...- .- . , ., .,- - -. .. - 11 . .'.'. - .'.'- k' _ ^: skr 's
._-_ ......... ............ .. .. , n x TA i r. M. F ! . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .'. . . . . .'.'.', . . . . . . . .'. . .':. ,, ,4 1 .t 11 !'
... .. .. . . .. ............. x5 a ....' ?.. r..,,.... .... ....... .. .. «, ... _ a ., _ : . *a , , '" c .-'i,. ..,, ; rs x, o.: r 4,. a rwr r, s a wz, > : a ... ....... .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan