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January 11, 1988 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-01-11

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The Michigan Daily-Monday, January 11, 1988- Page 3

Fleming won't cancel
class for King holiday

By JIM PONIEWOZIK
Interim University President
Robben Fleming said yesterday he
told members of the United Coalition
Against Racism(UCAR) the Univer-
sity administration will not ask the
Board of Regents to declare Martin
Luther King's birthday an official
University holiday.
Fleming said he made the an-
nouncement at a meeting Friday with
Rackham graduate students and
UCAR members Barbara Ransby and
Dan Holliman. Vice Provost for Mi-
nority Affairs Charles Moody was
also present at the meeting.
Last week, UCAR members had
called for students and staff to boy-
cott classes and University jobs to
honor the holiday. Ransby said the
boycott was announced before meet-
ing with Fleming because they as-
sumed the University would continue
its policy of holding class on Martin
Luther King Day.
Yesterday, Fleming supported his
decision, saying that the loss of class
time would inconvenience professors
who have planned their schedules to

include sessions on Jan. 18.
"Cancelling a day (of class) that's
already been committed is always
difficult," said Fleming.
But several professors have already
decided not to hold their classes on
the holiday.
Political Science Prof. Matthew
Evangelista, who has cancelled his
lecture for Political Science 470, said
he does not believe his students have
been inconvenienced.
"I have the impression that the
students understand the rationale be-
hind the decision, and are interested
in honoring Dr. King," said Evange-
lista.
Evangelista said he supports the
idea of creating a University holiday
in honor of Dr. King.
LSA junior Kim Jones, whose
Afro-American Studies 326 class
with Prof. Walter Allen was can-
celled, said she welcomed the cancel-
lation because she planned on partic-
ipating in Martin Luther King Day
activities in lieu of class.

Fleming
... wants classes on King holiday
"I think that (a University holiday
in honor of Dr. King) is long over-
due," said Jones. "I think it would
show a lot on the part of the Univer-
sity regarding concern for Blacks and
other minorities."

Police suspect West German
woman in '86 disco bombing

A fire late Friday morning on East Kingsley caused approximately $45,000 worth of damage but no injuries
were reported. It took eight fire trucks and 22 firefighters 45 minutes to put out the blaze.
Fire damages campus house

BERLIN (AP) - Police suspect a
West Berlin woman working for
Palestinian terrorists planted the
bomb that killed two U.S. soldiers
and wounded 229 people in a West
Berlin discotheque, authorities said
yesterday.
President Reagan had blamed
Libya for the April 5, 1986, La Belle
discotheque attack, which also killed
a Turkish woman, and ordered the
retaliatory bombing of Tripoli and
Benghazi 10 days later.
West Berlin justice department
spokesperson Volker Kaehne said
police were seeking 27-year-old
Christina Gabriele Endrigkeit, who
has been missing since the bombing.
Kaehne said an arrest warrant was
issued for her on Dec. 30 and that
authorities were offering a $93,000
reward for information leading to her
capture. West Berlin security sources
said Mrs. Endrigkeit, a German born
in West Berlin, was believed to be

hiding with her 3-year-old son.
"On the basis of seized documents
and according to eyewitness accounts
of her behavior before the explosion,
she is strongly suspected of bringing
the explosives into the club and
leaving the explosives there," Kaehne
said.
He did not elaborate, and make no
mention of Libya in his announce-
ment to reporters yesterday.
It was the first major lead the
authorities have disclosed in their
massive investigation into the
bombing. The disco was popular
with American soldiers, and was
crowded on the night of the attack.
The ZDF international television
network quoted unidentified police
sources as saying the woman had
been suspected for a long time but
that police only now had enough
evidence to issue an arrest warrant.-
"Mrs. Endrigkeit...allegedly acted
on behalf of the Jordanian-born

brothers Ahmed Nawaf Hasi and
Nezar Hindawi," said a security
source who spoke on condition of
anonymity. Both men are convicted
Palestinian terrorists.
Hasi was convicted of an earlier
West Berlin terrorist bombing and is
serving a 14-year prison sentence.
Hindawi is serving a 45-year sentence
in Britain for his 1986 conviction on
charges he tried to smuggle a bomb
onto an Israeli jetliner in London in
the luggage of his Irish girlfriend.
Kaehne said Hasi remains a
suspect in the La Belle bombing, but
he refused to elaborate. Hasi was
arrested two weeks after it and police
found what appeared to be drawings
of the club in his possession, but he
was never charged.
CLASSIFIED ADSI
Call 764-0557

By JILL REINSTEIN
Twenty-two firefighters, with eight trucks, extin-
guished a fire at 816 E. Kingsley late Friday morning.
No injuries were reported, but the house was damaged
extensively, said Ann Arbor Fire Department Battalion
thief Charles Torrey.
The landlord, Michael Bielby, said the house is
"mostly gutted." Two-thirds of the house was charred,
with extensive smoke damage throughout the whole
house, he said.
Bielby said there is about $45,000 worth of damage
to the house. Many of the tenants' personal belongings
and house furnishings, such as the hard wood floors and
bevelled glass French doors, were lost in the blaze, he
said.
The cause of the fire is still being investigated, but
fire department officials suspect that it was started by

an electric space heater in a first floor bedroom, Torrey
said.
The house was rented to seven people, mostly stu-
dents. Tiff Crutchfield was the only person inside when
the fire started at approximately 11 a.m. "I woke up
and smelled smoke," he said.
Crutchfield escaped by climbing through his bed-
room window and jumping off the porch roof, he said.
He sustained minor injuries on his wrist and knee.
"I just had time to put on jeans and shoes, and when
I got outside, a passerby lent me a coat," Crutchfield
said.
Bielby said he arranged for the tenants to stay in an-
other house, which he has recently purchased, while the
damaged one is being restored. He expects the house to
be rebuilt within a few months.

Debate grows over wait staff pay cut

LANSING (AP) - Supporters of
a bill to make Michigan restaurants
more profitable by cutting wages for
new waitresses and waiters claim the
proposal could create 60,000 new
jobs.
But labor interests and Commerce
Director Doug Ross - who de-
scribed the proposal as "inhumane"

- said with wages already low for
most service sector jobs it makes no-
sense to reduce the minimum wage
for food servers from $2.51 to $2.01
an hour.
Besides, Ross argues, there is al-
ready a shortage of qualified restau-
rant workers and reducing wages will
discourage rather than entice more

THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Campus Cinema
A m a d e u s (Milos Forman
1984)
Michigan Theater 9:20 p.m.
Forman's adaptation of the
stage hit treats a musical genius as
a manic/depressive Bozo (played
by Tom Hulce). Pleasant'and often
spectacular, but marred by its de-
piction of high-brow art flowing
from a low-brow mind. Won eight
Oscars, including Best Actor for F.
Murray Abraham.
Emital (Ousmane Sembene
1972)
Aud. B 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.
The fall of colonialism in mod-
emn Africa.
Tampopo (Juzo Itami 1987)
Michigan Theater 7:00 p.m.
The title character (the name

Zvi Brosh - Israeli ambassador
to the U.S., "Middle East Peace
Prospect in Perspective," 8 p.m.,
Pendelton Room, Mich. Union.
Maurya Simon - Visiting
Writers Series, 4 p.m., Rackham
East Conference Room.
Dr. Omeljan Pritsak -
Director of the Harvard U.
Ukranian Research Institute, "What
Really Happened in 988," 4:00
p.m., MLB Lecture Room #2.
Meetings
The Ann Arbor Cage B i r d
Club - 7 p.m., Matthei
Botanical Garden, 1800 N.
Dixboro Rd.
United Coalition A g a i n s t
Racism - Mass meeting, 7 p.m.,
Kuenzel Room, Mich. Union.
Christian Science
Organization - 7:15 p.m.,

applicants.
Michael Newman, president of
the Michigan Restaurant Associa-
tion, said the proposal, which his
1,800-member group supports, has
been largely misunderstood by its
critics.
Newman said the main objective
of the proposal isn't simply to lower
wages for existing restaurant em-
ployees, most of whom would be
protected under the bill.
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THE HONORABLE LOUIS STOKES
.
l / I ~
%. {
* Member of the House Committee on the Iran-Contra Affair
* Congressman of the 21st Congressional District of Ohio
" Served on the Select Committee to conduct an Investigation
and Study the Circumstances Surrounding the death of
President John F. Kennedy and the death of Dr. Martin
Luther King
CONGRESSMAN STOKES WILL BE
SPEAKING ON

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