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February 12, 1988 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Students
petiton
againstIR
By RYAN TUTAK
To fund or not to fund PIRGIM?
The Michigan Student Assembly
put the two-year-old question to rest
last September when it voted to al-
locate 75 cents of its student fee to
the Public Interest Research Group
in Michigan. But two students have
revived the debate by petitioning to
end the funding, claiming such pay-
ment is unwanted by many students
"and is unfair to other student groups.
Currently, students are automati-
cally assessed the 75 cent fee during
.-class registration. The fee is not
,mandatory, however. A refund can be
..obtained by filling out a form after
registration or at MSA's offices
throughout the term. MSA President
,Ken Weine said about 1 ,00O to
-2,000 students have requested re-
funds.
Proponents of the refund system
.say it is an unwanted inconvenience,
but Weine has said the number of
requests suggests the refund system
is effective.
Rackham graduate student and
MSA Rep. Steve Angelotti and
Business School junior Jon Bhushan
began soliciting students' signatures
Jan. 19 to oppose the current method
,.of funding PIRGIM.
Angelotti said more than enough
,,signatures have been collected to put
a referendum on MSA's March elec-
tion ballots to specify that PIRGIM,
like other student groups, receive
qMSA funding only from the assem-
See STUDENTS, Page 7

The Michigan Daily-Friday, February 12, 1988- Page 3
Senate begins budget discussion
By ANDREW MILLS and universities wanted. "This is probably the worst budget that higher
Special to the Daily But he said the recommendation must be education has seen in years and years and years
LANSING -The director of the state's looked at "within the confines of a very tight and years," Sederburg said.
budget office, testifying before the Senate Higher (state) fiscal situation." Solomon agreed there would be tuition
" Education Subcommittee yesterday, asked "We did cut in a lot of areas in the budget,"Slomon ad herwould e ttion
legislators to realize that an extremely tight Solomon said. "We didn't cut in higher ed. bease but said h dnt e es
(state) budget" puts severe constraints on funds The University had asked for an 11 percent
available for higher education. funding increase. But B l a n c h a r d' s Representatives from colleges and universities
The hearing was the first of several to be held recommendation, allotting a one percent hike for around the state braved the inclement weather-
during the legislature's budget process, ending in the University, has prompted warnings from which prompted the House of Representatives to
July with an appropriation for the state's colleges University officials that large tuition increases send its employees home early - to attend the
and universities. will be necessary. meeting.
3.ofShelby Solomon, director of the Department Sen. William Sederburg (R-East Lansing),
of Management and Budget, told the legislators chair of the subcommittee, said he was predicting The subcommittee will hold four mofe
he realized the one percent higher education an average tuition increase of 10 to 13 percent meetings around the state to hear testimony from
... assails bdg reommendation funding increase recommended by Gov. James across the state's four-year colleges and te idi alnstitutions about their financial
Blanchard was not as much as the state's colleges universities.
......ing AIDS, outside of abstinence. spread of the deadly disease. because I'm straight.'"
By KRISTINE LALONDE "Safe sex does not really exist. One man said he has had two The event was held to open dis-
A group of University students Only safer sex," a student said. AIDS tests within the last year, cussion on the disease, to help alle-
latnight discussed AIDS and how Sponsored by the Mosher-Jordan though he is now in a monogamous viate denials of personal risk, and4o
d isc u ss the disease has made them more residence hall library, the panel con- relationship. try affect the sexual practices of the
careful about sex. sisted of two women and two men, "Not only do you have to think participants, one panel member said.
A I S A four-member panel led about including two homosexuals. All about who you're sleeping with, but The audience was encouragedto
5 students in a discussion, empha- were University students. who they've been sleeping with," a ask questions and discuss persoral
9 sizing that no group is safe from The four University students student said. experences. Index cards and peps
contracting the disease, and people shared their feelings about AIDS and The discussion also dispelled were distributed for questions in sr-
sa a s UXshould not be fooled into thinking how they have adjusted their sexual myths about AIDS. One participant der to ease anxiety about aski g
there is a guaranteed way of prevent- activity because of the danger and said, "I thought, 'It can't affect me questions.

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I POLICE NOTESI
A Corrigan Moving Company
employee was injured at the
Undergraduate Library yesterday
while unloading a delivery truck.
The worker, identified as Steven
Carter, slipped while unloading a
partition intended for the library's
second floor, University security
officer Robert Newman said.
Carter received a cut above his
eye and was taken to University
Hospital. He was treated and released
with no complications expected,
hospital spokesperson Toni Shears
said. - Dayna Lynn
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STUDY SPRING IN THE NORTH WOODS
A new Course for Freshmen and Sophomore Non-Science Majors
Biology/RC 104, Introduction to the Natural Sciences
LOOKING FOR SOMETHING DIFFERENT? THIS IS IT!
Small class size, contact with senior faculty, and a "hands-on" approach to science for
non-scientists make this a unique opportunity. Come on up to the University of Michigan
Biological Station in the northern Lower Peninsula, and attend class in forests, dunes,
boss, and lakes. Learn some of the natural history of the region, and find out how the
native plants and animals interact with their environment. In the process, you'll also gain
an understanding of how scientists think and how science is done. This five-credit course
will meet May 14-June. 11, 1988. and will be limited to 3 sections of 17 students each.
Students and faculty will live in cabins at the Biological Station and all meals will be
served in the dining hall at the Station. Tuition will be $490 for Michigan residents and
$1360 for non-residents, and all students will pay a room and board fee of $320.
TO REGISTER: Contact the Biological Station Office, 2043 Natural Science Bldg., 763-4461,
You cannot register for this course throuh CRISP. Registration is on a first-come, first-
served basis, so act now to assure your place in the course.
Questions? Come to the: MASS MEETING
A slide presentation and question-and-answer sessicin
Tuedsay, February 16, 8:00 p.m.
Natural Science Bldg. Auditorium
Development of this course is funded by the Provost's Undergraduate Initiatives Fund.
Is the only MAC you know
a hamburger?

Attention Engineering
Undergraduate Students
1988 Landes Prize Announcement
Undergraduate students currently registered in the Engineering College
are eligible to compete for the George M. Landes Prize ($800). This is an award
presented annually to an undergraduate student who demonstrates excellence of
both technical work and the presentation of that work in written or graphic
form. The prize is presented in memory of George M. Landes, a 1977 graduate
of the Mechanical Engineering Department and a Ford Motor Company
engineer who was killed in an automobile.accident in 1981.
To enter, a student must submit a single piece of technical work. This
presentation -- written, graphic, or some combination of communication media
-- can be a technical article, a design report, a piece of technical journalism, or

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You can't eat a Macintosh computer, but you can learn to use one. That's
-1- T'ST/ I NT 'A O . Y. N f IN A. NR A t M 1 C C'1 1 11tnn Y . A A 1.

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