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February 11, 1988 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-02-11

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, February 11, 1988-,Page 9
S a Brown's inpirational
-~p -play spurs on team

By LISA GILBERT
"The Motivator".
Every team in sports needs one.
Either a player or a coach, who the
team looks to as a source of inspira-
tion. This special person is gifted
with the ability to raise the level of
performance of those around her.
The Michigan women's basket-
ball team is lucky enough to have
such a player on their roster this
season.
IN GAMES and in practice this
player is always shouting words of
encouragement to her teammates,
urging them to put out that extra ef-
fort. This player is also an excep-
tional talent, leading the team in
scoring in only her first season as a
starter - this player is sophomore
sensation Tempie Brown.
"Tempie gets us fired up," said
senior guard Vonnie Thompson.
"She reminds people that basketball
is fun and we're out there to have a
good time."
Coach VanDeWege also realizes
the impact of Brown's presence on
the rest of the team. "She's an emo-
tional player who gets people go-
ing," said VanDeWege. "She has the
potential to be an excellent leader."
Being known as team cheerleader
is a role Brown seems to enjoy. "If
I'm into it, so is the rest of the
team. Enthusiasm is contagious. I'm
always the first to give someone a
pat on the back because I know how
good it feels to get that extra
encouragement."
BROWN credits most of her
ability to motivate others to her
high school coach, Betsy Phillips.
"Coach Phillips inspired me to play

my best. She pushed me to the limit
and taught me what motivation re-
ally means."
After a superb high school career
in Denver, CO., she received schol-
arship offers from several schools,
but Michigan was an easy first
choice. "When I visited, I really en-
joyed the staff and surroundings. In
addition, you can't get a better
education."
Not to be overlooked is the fact
that her cousin Gerald White was the
Wolverines starting fullback her se-
nior year.
Like many high school stars,
Brown found the adjustment to col-
lege ball extremely frustrating. She
suffered through a disappointing first
year, scoring only 4.8 points per
game.
"The competition was phenome-
nal. I had no clue what I was up
against. I thought I worked hard in
high school until I attended my first
practice at Michigan."
OVER THE SUMMER
Brown went back to Denver and
played in several basketball leagues
with players from the women's Pan
American and Olympic teams.
"Playing against top notch com-
petition this summer really enabled
me to build my confidence," she ex-
plained. "I did a lot of serious think-
ing and came back this year ready to
go.
This season Brown has emerged
as a star. She has led the Wolverines
in scoring nine times this year, in-
cluding a career high 26 points
against North Carolina.
With last year's leading scorer
Lorea Feldman out for the season,

Brown has been given the opportu-
nity to step in and pick up the scor-
ing slack. She has done just that,
scoring key baskets along the way.
LATE in the Northwestern game
with the score deadlocked, Brown
connected on a jump shot to give
Michigan the lead for good. Two
days later against Wisconsin Brown
did it again. This time it was a three
point shot that tied the game as the
Wolverines battled back from a 13-
point deficit to complete the week-
end sweep.
After her four years at Michigan
are over, Brown, a kinesiology ma-
jor, plans to go into physical ther-
apy. "I like to help out other people
and other athletes."
Still, basketball will always have
a special place in her heart. "I'd like
to coach high school one day and be
a positive role model for kids, " she
said with a smile.
From the way things look now,
she's already accomplished this goal.

Daily Photo by JESSICA GREENE
Michigan's Christine Furlong performs a "whip" during her first-place-
winning effort on the balance beam Saturday night. Furlong helped the
Wolverines defeat Illinois State in the dual meet at Crisler Arena.
M' Gymnast Furlong's
value vaults higher

Brown
... makes game fun

i
M

- (

What

s

Happening

BY STEVEN GINNS
The investment in gymnast
Christine Furlong has paid instant
dividends for the Michigan women's
gymnastic team.
The 5-5 Furlong, only in her first
year, has already made a strong con-
tribution to the women's team. In
her first collegiate meet, she estab-
lished a new team record by scoring
a 9.6 on the beam.
In the following weeks, she con-
tinued to perform impressively.
During :ast week's 181-170.5
victory over Illinois State, she won.
the beam and finished second in the
all-around with a 36.6.
Due to an ankle injury, Furlong
has not competed at full strength
this season. Her blue chip perfor-
mances, therefore, have not been a
true indication of all her ability. Yet,
she has still managed to finish in the
top three in every meet. She is ex-
pected to be fully recovered in time
for the Big Ten Championships,
March 25-26 at Illinois.
FURLONG'S abilities have
become valuable assets to the team.
Despite spreading her talents
between bars, beam, floor and vault,
she has managed to perform
consistently.
"She's extremely important to
us," said head coach D a n a
Kempthorn. "Chris has over a 9.0
average in every event and taking her
out of the lineup would hurt our
team score."
This is the high rate of return that
was expected when the talented Fur-
long decided to attend Michigan.
Ever since she was eight and outper-
formed her competition in the gym-
nastics program that her cousin in-
fluenced her to join, big things were
expected.
"I was able to do a lot of things
that the girls'in there for a couple of
months couldn't do yet, " said Fur-
long.
HER STOCK continued to rise
UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION:
SUPREME COURT CASES
by Den is Killeen
This book distills two centuries of con-
stitutional development in a comprehen-
sive and readable manner. More than 450
cases are discussed, many in capsule form.
The narrative flows from the early 19th
century definition of the power of the
Court to strike down a statute as uncon-
stitutional to the recent voiding of a state
requirement that creation be taught with
evolution in the public schools. A triumph
of disciplined clarity.
Hartfordshire Press Ltd
Box 295
W. Hartford, CT 06107
Please send me postpaid a copy of United
States Constitution: Supreme Court Cases
(softcover). I am enclosing $19.95. Con-
necticut residents add $1.50 sales tax.
Name
Address

at the high school level. In 1985 she
was the New Jersey State Champion
in the all-around, beam and bars. She
then placed first in the beam, bars
and vault at the 1986 New England
Cup.
"High school gymnastics was
very good for me," said the energetic
Furlong. "I was the star of the team
and it was a fun thing."
When Kempthorn saw her per-
form, it was love at first sight. "I
had seen Christine when she was a
junior and I was very impressed with
her performance," said Kempthorn.
"I knew I wanted her for our pro-
gram."
Furlong, who practices gymnas-
tics year round, decided to come to
Ann Arbor. "Michigan had every-
thing I wanted, everything to offer
me," stated Furlong. "Except the
weather."
Besides getting used to the
weather she has had to make the
academic adjustments necessary in
college. Furlong also has had to ad-
just her athletic life to the new
coaches.
"It was weird to see the different
techniques of coaching, but Mike
(Assistant Coach Mike Milidonis)
and Dana are great," said Furlong.
"They've helped a lot, and my
teammates have helped so much."
What she forgot to mention is
how much she has helped the team
and how much more she will benefit
it in the years to come.

II

Recreational Sports
. MEN'S SOCCER CLUB TRYOUTS .
MON., FEBRUARY 15
and
WED., FEBRUARY 17, 1988
8:00 pm
SPORTS COLISEUM
(Fifth Avenue and Hill Street)
For more information, call John Metsker
" 662-9235

..y
i :
f]
"
r° '
;.,
.

Bands needed for

LC3 f cfItE
LQ3

o2i1l

March 95 10
Finals March 12

a

Pick up applications at

THE
l \I% Rti1
CLUB

2105 M-Union

763-1107

Fri.,
Feb.12

MICHIGRAS '88

Fri.,
Feb. 12

Fri.,
Feb. 12
Sat.,
Feb. 13
Sun.,
Feb.14
Sun.,
Feb.14

The University of Michigan
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Faculty Carillon Recital
Margo Halsted, University Carilloneur
Burton Memorial Tower, 7:00 p.m.
FREE.
Symphony Band/Wind Ensemble
H. Robert Reynolds, conductor
Hindemith: Organ Concerto
Benson: Passing Bell
Maslanka: Child's Garden of Dreams
Holst: Suite #1
Hill Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
FREE.
Guest Artist Percussion Recital: Amy
Knoles
Greg Fish, MIDI performer
Works for percussion with computer and
MIDI including Steve Reich's "Piano
Phase," and Greg Fish's "A Little Light
Music"
Rackham Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
FREE.
Contemporary Directions Ensemble
Richard Rosenberg, conductor
Yishak Schotten, viola
John Costa: Outono, na Padra de Mar
(Autumn, on the Pearl of the Sea)
Morton Subotnick: The Key to Songs
Benjamin Britten: Lacrymae, for viola
and string orchestra
Rackham Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
FREE.
Stearns 2+2=2 Lecture
Lois Anderson, University of Wisconsin
"Royal Music from Kingdoms of East
Africa"
McIntosh Theatre, 2:00 p.m.
FREE.
Michigan Chamber Players
Armando Ghitalla, trumpet; H. Dennis
Smith, trombone; George Shirley, tenor;
Harry Sargous, oboe; Jacob Krachmanlick,
violin; Jerome Jelinek, cello; Louis Nagel,
piano
Blacher: Divertimento for Trumpet,

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