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February 08, 1988 - Image 33

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-02-08

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EBRUARY 1988
inness
ontinued From Page 19
ia. Both disorders are on the rise with
n estimated 0.5 percent of 12-18 year-
d American females suffering from
orexia nervosa, and 5 percent of
dolescent and young adult females
howing an incidence of bulimia; some
gures are estimating the prevalence of
ulimia at 20 percent of college-age
omen!
Males are not excluded from these
isorders, as an estimated 5-10 percent
f all anorexia nervosa and bulimia
ases are found in men, with the possi-
lity that up to 5 percent of college-age
ales are bulimics.
Anorexia nervosa is a syndrome of
elf-induced starvation or dehydration
hat is characterized by: an intense fear
f becoming fat (which does not dimin-
sh as weight loss occurs); disturbed
ody image (no matter what anorexics
ook like, their self-perception is too
at); weight loss of more than 25 percent
originalweight; avoluntaryrefusalto
at or to maintain a normal body
eight; in females, a loss of menstrual
ycles; and lastly, no known illness
leading to the weight loss. The "typical"
norexic tends to be a perfectionist, obe-
ient, overly compliant, highly moti-
ated, successful academically and
thletically, and well-liked, by peers.
requently, parents have high expecta-
ions and are overly protective; family
nflicts are not resolved readily and it
is hypothesized that anorexics restrict
their food intake, pursuing "perfect
thinness," as a way to exert some con-
trol in their lives.
Once they start dieting, they can't
stop. In order to survive, an anorexic's
body will literally break down its own
muscles and vital organs (including the
heart) for energy, drastically altering
the metabolic and electrolyte balances.
"he physical consequences are often
fatal.
Bulimia is recognized as recurrent
episodes of binge eating (rapid food con-
sumption in less than two hours) with at
least three of the following characteris-
tics: consumption of high-calorie, easi-
ly-digested food during a binge; ter-
mination of the binge by abdominal
pain, sleep, social interruption, or self-
'nduced vomiting; repeated attempts to
Nose weight by severely restricted diets,
self-induced vomiting, or laxative or
diuretic use; and frequent weight fluc-
tuation greater than 10 pounds due to
alternating binges and fasts. Bulimia
includes an awareness of abnormal eat-
ing patterns and the fear of not being
able to stop voluntarily, depressed
mood and self-deprecating thoughts fol-
lowing binges.
Bulimics begin to diet, they get hun-
gry, binge-eat (the normal response to
starvation and dieting), feel guilty,
which leads to purging, more guilt sets
in and the cycle continues. Secondary to
the regurgitated stomach acids from
persistent vomiting, the bulimic may
have bad breath, chronic sore throat,
swollen salivary glands and eroded
teeth. Frequent vomiting, laxative
abuse and diuretic use leads to altera-
kion of fluid status, constipation, di-
arrhea, and esophageal or stomach
hemmorhage, which may prove fatal.
WHERE TO GO FOR HELP

American Anorexia/Bulimia Association, lnc.(AA/
BA), 133 Cedar Lane, Teaneck, NJ 07666. 201-
836-1800. Anorexia Nervosa & Related Eating Dis-
orders, Inc.(ANRED), P.O. Box. 5102, Eugene, OR
97405. 503-344-1144. National Anorexia Aid Soci-
ety, Inc.(NAAS), P.O. Box 29461, Columbus, OH
43229. 614-436-1112. National Association of
Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, in-
c.(ANAD), P.O. Box 217, Highland Park, IL 60035.
312-831-3438.

U. THE NATIONAL COLLEGE NEWSPAPER 23

There is no single cause for eating
disorders; a combination of psychologic-
al, familial, sociocultural and biological
factors contribute to them. There is in-
creasing evidence that society's emph-
asis on thinness is placing great press-
ures on many adolescents to strive for a
thinner body shape.
There is also no one method of treat-
ment. Each case represents an indi-
vidual with specific needs; optimal
treatment includes combining nutri-
tional rehabilitation, psychotherapy,
behavior modification, family therapy
and possibly medication. Treatment
spans months or years, and final prog-
nosis is questionable.
Preventing eating disorders is not yet
possible, but the recognition that people
come in many shapes and sizes, and a
wide range of body types is acceptable in
our society, may help. Appropriate
education in nutrition and exercise
management may lead to a decline in
the incidence of eating disorders.

HOW iUUSA KILLS
HYPOKALEMIA: A loss of serum
potassium, due to low food intake or
vomiting, which can lead to heart or
kidney failure. This is the mosf se-
rious consequence.
DEHYDRATION: Due to10low food
intake or vomifing.
INTERNAL BLEEDING: Including
gastric ulcers, due to trauma from
forceful vomiting.
TOOTH AND GUM DECAY: Due to
vomiting of stomach acids.
ESOPHAGAL RUPTURES
ENLARGED SALIVARY GLANDS
ELECTROLYTE IMBALANCE
Nicole Blohm-Daily Trojan, U. of
Southern California

Doctors
Continued From Page 19
nifer Botts, a health aide and one of two
student coordinators for the program.
Most health aides say their experi-
ences as "dorm doctors" have been re-
warding.
"I like to feel that I make a difference
in the residence hall, that I can help a
person physically and emotionally,"
said Anita Spiess, the other student
coordinator.
Their responsibilities include
"answering every knock on the door
anytime of the night no matter what,
because they're responsible for every re-
sident in the dorm," Botts said.
Last year's 50 health aides handled
more than 5,000 cases, each averaging
40 cases per quarter, Lubin said.
"What I think makes our program un-
ique is that it is voluntary," she said.
"Their pay is chocolate chip cookies."

A I O H N H UG H E S F IL M

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