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February 08, 1988 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-02-08

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Men's Basketball
vs. Indiana
Saturday, 4 p.m.
Crisler Arena

SPORTS
Monday, February 8, 1988

Men's Swimming
vs. Michigan State
Friday, 7:30
Matt Mann Pool

The Michigan Daily

Page 9

Loss leaves 'M'

For Pete
BY PETE STEINER'

's Sake

Vaught slips...

...Michigan falls
The rap on Loy Vaught in the past has been he lacks consistency.
He's a great athlete, but he lacks consistency.
In yesterday's 91-87 loss to Purdue at Crisler Arena, those very
words came back to haunt him.
Things started innocently enough for the 6-9 junior. He helped
spark a 25-14 run midway through the first half that turned a 17-14
Boilermaker lead into a 39-31 Wolverine advantage.
VAUGHT'S vicious two-hand slam dunk underneath gave the
Wolverines their first lead of the contest, 20-19. Crisler Arena erupted.
On Michigan's very next possession, Vaught sank a layup to in-
crease the score to 22-19. More cheers.
Several minutes later, Vaught literally rose to the occasion again.
On a fast break Rumeal Robinson sent the ball backwards between his
legs to a trailing No. 35, who did what he does best - dunk. Even
more cheers.
That point marked the Wolverines' biggest lead of the game, 39-
31, and it also marked Vaught's last points of the day.
THINGS STARTED TO TURN SOUR for the center after
that. Late in the half he launched back-to-back air balls, the first of
which he said was an errant pass to Mark Hughes underneath.
The next one he just flat out missed.
"I was at an angle," Vaught explained, "and I was kind of undecided
whether I wanted to use the backboard or shoot it straight on. I ended
up kind of getting caught in the middle."
Vaught's misfortunes carried over into the second half. His ineffec-
tiveness helped allow Purdue regain its lead. He admitted the air ball
had shaken his confidence.
"I made sure I wasn't going to shoot anymore until I got like a
downcourt layup or something close to the basket," he said.
On one occasion Vaught held the ball with an open shot on the
baseline, but he opted to pass it.
VAUGHT ENDED UP playing less than nine minutes in the
second half. He grabbed one rebound after pulling down five in the
first half. And he only took one shot, and that shot might have cost
Michigan the game and sole possession of first place in the Big Ten.
With less than 10 seconds left and Purdue leading, 89-87, Vaught,
Michigan's most efficient field goal shooter, took a feed from Glen
Rice along the right baseline. He lofted a half-hook shot - a shot he
has made time and time again this season - toward the basket.
Vaught's shot fell off the rim and into the hands of the Boilermak-
ers. More cheers. But only from the Boilermaker faithful behind the
Purdue bench.
"He (Rice) looked like he was going to shoot it," Vaught said, "so
I darted over to the other side of the lane in hopes I could get a tip in
or something like that.
"I looked back over my shoulder waiting for him to shoot the ball,
and he saw me, I guess. Then he threw it in there, and it kind of
caught me by surprise, but I just shot the hook shot, and it didn't
fall."
"We wanted Gary or Glen (to shoot the ball)," Michigan coach Bill
Frieder said. "They knew it. But the ball goes to Loy. He's wide open
for a three-footer. You got to to take that."
THE SCENARIO that unraveled yesterday was unfortunate be-
cause things like that shouldn't happen to the nice guys in sports,
especially in a nationally televised game that meant so much.
In addition, Vaught has made tremendous strides in his play this
season to shake himself of past labels. Taking over the starting center
position in the eighth game of the year, he has responded with 9.9
points and 6.4 rebounds per game.
For one day, though, Vaught slipped, and it cost dearly.
O Iowa whips Michigan
women cagers, 89-54

second in
(Continued from Paget
second of two free throws in front of
a frenzied, towel-waving student sec-
tion, Purdue had an 89-87 lead with
23 seconds remaining. Michigan then
had a chance to tie the game, but Loy
Vaught missed a short hook shot
with less than ten seconds to play.
Without any timeouts left, the
Wolverines weren't able to set up a
play, and Vaught became the best
option when Glen Rice found him
open underneath the basket.
"We wanted Glen or Gary
(Grant), and they knew it," Frieder
said, "but the ball goes in to Loy,
he's wide open for a three-footer and
he's got to take it."
A scramble for the loose ball en-1
sued. Jones recovered it and was
fouled with three seconds left. Jones
hit both free throws to give the
Boilermakers their four-point victory
margin.
"I didn't- let (the crowd) bother
me,"Jones said. "I just put my head
down and concentrated on the free
throws."
PU R D U E was led by Todd
Mitchell's 22 points and Troy Lewis'
20. Lewis also had six rebounds and
six assists. Everette Stephens had 16
points and seven assists, while
Melvin McCants had 15 points.
All four of those players were re-
turning starters from last season and
had never won a game at Michigan.
They remembered last year's embar-
rassing loss and also wanted to end
the Boilermakers' three-game Crisler
Arena losing streak.

Big Ten
"This is one of our bigger wins
since I've been here," Mitchell said.
"We've never won here before and we
didn't want to go our whole career
without winning at every Big Ten
school."
As for last year's loss, head coach
Gene Keady said, "That's all erased
now. This takes care of that."
In the first half, it looked like the
Wolverines were ready for a repeat of
last season. Trailing 15-8, they went
on a 21-7 run, including a 10-0
stretch, to go up 29-22. Following a
half-court alley-oop pass from
Rumeal Robinson to Rice and a be-
tween the legs pass from Robinson
to Vaught for a dunk, Michigan led
by eight, 39-31.
The lead would get no larger,
though, as the experienced Boiler-
makers closed to 43-41 at the half.
The lead see-sawed in the second
half, with Grant .keeping the
Wolverines in the game with clutch
shots in the final minutes. The
senior guard hit a three-point shot;
from the corner to tie the game at 82
with 3:39 remaining.
The Boilermakers then took the
lead for good when McCants hit a
short jumper. After a Terry Mills
miss, Purdue scored on two straight
possessions with less than five
seconds left on the shot clock.
Grant hit for 32 points, 19 in the:
second half, and became the third
Wolverinetin history to score 2,OOO
career points.
Rice had 23 points, while Robin-:
son added 11 points.

Daily Photo by DAVID LUBIINER
Michigan's Terry Mills blocks Purdue's Steve Scheffler yesterday. Mills
had 10 points and 14 rebounds in the loss.
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WHAT DO YOU THINK
ABOUT A BRAND NEW
LANGUAGE LAB?
WE'D LIKE TO KNOW!
ANNOUNCING:
AN OPEN MEETING
To discuss a New Beginning - renovation .
and transformation of the Language Laboratory.
We've redesigned the whole thing thinking
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and learn. We're excited about the possibilities,
and want to share our plans* thus far with YOU.
Please join us
Wednesday, February 10, 4-6:00 pm
in B1124 MLBp
This is an opportunity for you to comment, react,
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We'll see you then!
*Copies of the design sketches are posted in the Language Lab also.

By MICHAEL GILL
The women's basketball team
learned why Iowa is No. 1. It learned
why in resounding fashion, with an
89-54 thrashing to the Hawkeyes
last night at Crisler Arena.
The loss ended the Wolverines'
(11-8 overall, 4-5 Big Ten) three-
game winning streak, which included
an 83-71 victory Friday over Min-
nesota.
The full-court press, which
Michigan used to its advantage Fri-
day, caused much difficulty for them.
Iowa continuously forced Michigan
turnovers.
"The press was our weapon,"
M Michigan coach Bud VanDeWege
said last night. "We had nothing that
we could hurt them with. They took
our press away and when you don't
have your major weapon, you cannot
gain confidence."
Iowa coach Vivian Stringer was
surprised that Michigan wanted to
play an up-tempo game, the
Hawkeyes' strong point.
"They've got the talent to play an
up-tempo game," said Stringer. "I
thought perhaps they had a little
more talent and could give us a
problem. I was very cautious. On
our behalf, an uptempo game is in
our favor."

Iowa (18-0, 9-0) took hold of the
game by breaking open a 20-17 lead
with 10 unanswered points. This
was followed by another six straight
points in part of a 28-10 scoring
streak the last 11 minutes of the first
half.
There were a few bright moments
for the Wolverines. With the score
20-15, Lisa Reynolds received and
inbounds pass and flung the ball
down court to Tempie Brown.
Brown scurried after the ball and
dumped it directly over her head to
Reynolds who laid it in.
Friday night, Michigan had made
it three wins in a row with an 83-71
victory over Minnesota. Sophomore
Tanya Powell labelled the game "a
dogfight."
Midway through the first half,
Minnesota seemingly began to take
control, scoring eight consecutive
points to take a 28-19 lead. Michi-
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