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January 08, 1988 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-01-08

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, January 8, 1988- Page 3
- - - - - - - - - - - -

Students sign banner
for Salvadoran school

By DAVID SCHWARTZ
More than 500 students signed a
banner in the fishbowl yesterday
which proclaimed solidarity between
the University and its sister school,
the University of El Salvador.
Social work graduate student Julie
Laser, a member of the Michigan
Student Assembly's Peace and Jus-
tice Committee, will take the banner
to El Salvador Saturday. She will fly
there with 20 students from other
universities that have ties to the
Salvadoran school.
The delegates will meet with stu-
dents in El Salvador in an effort to
better understand the way of life in
that country.
"This is a first step in getting an
open line of communication with
the University of El Salvador," Laser
said.
Laser is the only University stu-
dent going with this delegation, the
first to visit the University of El
Salvador since it was adopted as a
sister school on Oct. 20.
The University of El Salvador
was designated a sister school "to
make people more aware about
what's going on in El Salvador, es-
pecially with other students like
ourselves," Laser said.
The University of El Salvador is

the only public university in that
country, and has roughly 5,000 stu-
dents. In 1980, it was shut down by
the military, and it was not reopened
until 1984.
Laser said MSA decided to estab-
lish ties with the Salvadoran univer-
sity because El Salvador is the third
largest recipient of U.S. aid, and the
'This is a first step in
getting an open line o f
communication with the
University of El Salvador,'
- MSA Peace and
Justice Committee member
Julie Laser
country does not receive much media
attention.
She said the relationship with the
University of El Salvador will result
in a "a better understanding of what
each other's school is doing."
A delegation of about 15 Univer-
sity of Michigan students is plan-
ning to visit El Salvador in either
May or June.

4

Owner of Frank' s

Daily Photo by KAREN HANDELMAN

leaves af
By JENNIFER MILLER
Gus Mermigas, at age 62, is
ready to retire.
But his restaurant isn't going into
retirement so soon.
Tucked away between Renais-
sance clothing and Ariel' s Restaurant
'and Deli, and sitting directly across
from the fast food product of Mc-
Donald's, Frank's Restaurant has
become a tradition in Ann Arbor
diners.
The new owner, former Salvation
Army worker Mabel Lintang, plans
to continue business as usual with
only a few long-range changes in
mind. For now, the name, menu,
and staff - including Mermigas'
three sons, who work as chefs and
waiters - will remain the same.
Mermigas has owned the restau-
rant since he bought it 14 years ago
from his wife's cousin, Frank, who
owned it for 16 years. He sold the
establishment Jan. 1 for $100,000.
Gus plans on familiarizing Lintang
with the workings of the restaurant,
but will eventually ease into retire-
ment.
And Frank's regular clientelle,
including police officers, students,
and administrators, will probably
miss Gus. His son John said of the
diner, "It's a Great American melting
pot and we love everybody! In the
older days, my Dad would feed those
without a home. One time a guy
came back five years later dressed in
a suit and payed my Dad back. Dad

r 14 years
can really reach people. As a father
you can't beat him."
Mermigas' three sons, Steve,
John, and George, grew up working
in the family establishment. The
work hasn't always been easy, John
said. When short of help, Gus would
call his sons away from their home-
work to help out at the restaurant.
"The times just got harder; the
rent started at $900 and now it sky-
rockets over $3,000," said John,
who began working when he was 12
and started getting paid at age 16.
During the first three years at
Frank's, Gus Mermigas worked 18
hours a day, seven days a week.
Mermigas, originally from
Greece, offers Hellenic food on
Tuesdays and Thursdays.
The Mermigas' concern for cus-
tomers goes as far as making sure
clients have balanced meals. Even
though the burgers come with
everything, John said he tries to turn
people away from them and choose a
good meal, "like a roast beef dinner."
Mayor Gerald Jernigan dines at
Frank's once or twice a week. The
food, he said, is "okay," and he goes
to Frank's "because it's close, and I
enjoy the exercise." Jernigan doesn't
feel the change of ownership will
mean a change at Frank's, but even
if it does, "The important fact is that
it will still remain a facility," he
said.

Live from the Fishbowl
Chris Lindensmith, LSA senior, spins tunes for WCBN-FM on location in the Fishbowl yesterday. The student-run radio station sold coffee
and donuts during the broadcast to raise money and "remind students that they exist".
sr0e
Jude'srulng ives Bush a legal victory

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP)
- A circuit judge yesterday over-
turned a change in state Republican
Party rules, which was aimed at cur-
tailing vice President George Bush's
campaign effort in Michigan.
The state will select the nation's
first GOP presidential delegates later
this month.
The decision by Kent County
Circuit Judge Roman Snow was the
second legal victory for Bush sup-
porters against a coalition of Pat
Robertson and Jack Kemp supporters
that controls the state party.
Bush supporters said the triumph
was the biggest yet in their bitter
battle with the Kemp-Robertson
coalition.
"Magnificent. It's a big, big
win," said Peter Secchia, one of four
Bush co-chairs in Michigan and a
member of the Republican National
Committee.
"It was a pretty ringing decision
by the judge," said John Long, the
director of Bush's Michigan cam-

paign. "He was very firm in his de-
cision that it (the rule change) was
untimely and unlawful."
Snow ruled that a Dec. 12 rules
change by the 101 m e m b e r
Republican State Committee -
controlled by the Robertson-Kemp
coalition - violated national party
rules and state law. And Snow said
the changes also violated another
Kent County Circuit Court judge's
ruling.
After a shaky start, Bush forces.
mounted a strong effort in Michigan
and diluted Robertson's surprising
showing by prevailing at the county
level on apportionment and redis-
tricting decisions for delegates to the
county conventions.
About 10,000 Republicans will
attend next Thursday's county con-
ventions and choose about 1,800
delegates to the Jan. 29-30 state
convention, where Michigan's
presidential delegates will be parceled
out, more than a week before the
Iowa caucuses.

"It is clear the county committees
have been given the authority (under
state law) to select the system for
selecting delegates," Snow said,
echoing a Dec. 4 ruling by Judge
George Boucher that struck down
Sept. 15 rules changes sought by the
Kemp-Robertson coalition.
Michael Gagleard, the attorney for
the state party, argued that it was an
internal GOP question and didn't be-
long in the courts.
"The heart of the matter... is an
intra-party fight in the Michigan
Republican Party," he said.
Michael Legg, a state committee
member who was appointed to over-
see the legal action, said the com-
mittee now would focus its attention
on its appeal of Boucher's ruling and
a lawsuit pending in U.S. District
Court in Detroit.
A handful of Robertson and
Kemp activists filed the lawsuit on
Dec. 15, seeking to have the state
laws behind Boucher's decision de-

Bush
... wins legal battle
clared unconstitutional. A hearing on
the federal lawsuit has been sched-
uled for Tuesday.

I

Cold snap has mixed
effect on crime, homeless

A

What's
Happening

American Jews worry
about violence in Isreal

WASHINGTON (AP) -
American Jews are profoundly dis-
tressed over the violence in the West
Bank and Gaza and divided over what
Israel should do to end the crisis,
community leaders and others said in
interviews.
Jews feel a "great sense of pain
and anguish... an embarrassment" by
scenes on television of Israelis
shooting Arabs, said Hyman Book-
binder, head of the American Jewish
Committee.
They also think it is "terribly
unfair" that Israel is taking all the
blame for a situation that stems
from the failure of all sides to deal
with the Palestinian issue, he said.
The disturbances - the worst in
Israel's 20-year occupation of the
territories - have prompted an un-
usual degree of public criticism of
Israel's actions by American Jews as
well as a public airing of their
differences.

Leaders of mainstream Jewish or-
ganizations insist the riots have not
caused a major schism in their ranks,
but they acknowledge many Jews are
upset and confused over the situa-
tion.
Bookbinder and others said the
disturbances in which Israeli troops
have shot and killed at least 24
Palestinians since Dec. 8 have not
weakened American Jews' attach-
ment for the Jewish state, born in
1948 as a haven for Jews from
around the world.
"Pain, yes; disappointment, yes;
confusion, yes," Rabbi Alexander
Schindler said.
Morris Abram, head of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations in
New York, said there was "no split"
over Israel's policies in the 45
groups represented in his umbrella
coalition.

(Continued from Page 1)
"When it's extremely cold, busi-
nesses tighten down because of the
weather. There are therefore fewer
instances of breaking and entering
compared to a hot, muggy July
night when windows are kept open
for air," he said.
Lunsford also said fewer people
stay out in the evenings. "It's easier
to put the town to bed for the night
when it's bitter cold out."
Sergeant Gary Hill of the
University Department of Public
Safety said the cold weather brings
more indoor crime, like stealing
backpacks, and less outdoor thefts.
The number of crimes reported on
campus, Hill said, remains un-
changed.
Although frigid temperatures
generally drive many homeless peo-
ple to the warmth of shelters, Tom
Dorian of the Salvation Army's Ar-
bor Haven Emergency Shelter said
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there has not been -a drastic increase
in the number of residents in the
shelter.
The Associated Press contributed
to this report
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
"Beginning of New Term" Service
Sun., Jan. 10, 10:30 a.m.
1511 Washtenaw, 663-5560

Recreational Sports
LEARN TO CROSS COUNTRY SKI THIS WINTER!
Each Saturday and Sunday between January 9 and February 14,
1988 the Outdoor Recreation Program will be offering Ski Clinics
at our RADRICK FARMS NORDIC SKI CENTER (4875 Geddes).
THIS WEEKEND'S SKI CLINICS TAKE PLACE:

Sat., January 9
Sun., January 10

11:00am-12:30pm Beg. I; II
2:00 pm-3:30pm Int.; Ski Skating
11:00am-12:30pm Beg. 1; II
2:00pm-3:30pm Beg. I; II

FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION CALL 764-3967 .

1' V
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