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February 05, 1988 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-02-05

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4

Page 8 -The Michigan Daily-Friday, February 5, 1988

Artist reveals private
personal collection

By Lauren Shapiro

Intimate private and personal
matters are the subject of Hannelore
Baron's exhibit The Last Ten Years:
Collages and Boxes. While her art
suggests the intensity of her life ex-
perience and history, Baron also in-
corporates a child-like mystique into
many of her works.
Baron began creating these col-
lages and boxes from paper and cloth
she collected. Often, she would
stitch together cloth which had been
spotted, scribbled on, torn, or frayed
to convey the process of recycling.
In an article on Baron, Sue Taylor
notes that these worn materials have,
"a look of history, of use and abuse;
each is a record of rips and tears, su-
tures and scars."
Baron was born in Germany in
1926. She narrowly escaped the
Holocaust by emigrating to the
United States in the late 1930s.
Sadly, Baron,saw both of her parents

taken by the Nazis. In her earlier
works, Baron revealed her pain and
grief through figures oppressed by
mummified wraps lying in body
bags and coffins.
More recently, Baron has begun
to rely on her materials and collec-
tive collages to convey her memo-
ries. She uses softly muted colors
which contrast with the strength of
her powerful yet painful message.
She also incorporates cloth striped
like prisoners' uniforms and a
strange hieroglyphic language
which, through its crudity, remains a
beautiful untranslatable message.
Baron never formally studied art,
but she feels "a continuity in both
method and content, where one
theme seems to grow out of the
other without conscious effort." She
wants her art to appear calm and
realistic, so that "nothing is forced
or artificial."
With close self-analysis, Baron
claims, "I am a pacifist, and find the

world as it is almost intolerable.
There is a strong feeling in me that
as an exhibiting artist, it is my duty
to make a statement for peace." In
Baron's earlier works the use of torn
flags suggest her protests of both
war and dangerously nationalistic at-
titudes.
In one box work, Baron has tied
together an old wooden box and put
tokens from a child's game inside.
One may view this work as Baron's
own interpretation of her childhood
in war-torn Germany - trapped in a
box with no room to grow or ex-
plore. This is the power within
Baron's work. She allows her audi-
ence to see within her experiences,
yet her art leaves room for individual
interpretation and sentiment.
Hannelore Baron's exhibit THE
LAST TEN YEARS: COLLAGES
AND BOXES will be showing at
the Alice Simsar Gallery until
February 17, 1988. The Gallery is
located at 301 North Main Street.
The Gallery will be open Tuesday -
Saturday, 10 - 5:30 p.m. For fur-
ther information, call 665-4883.

Artist Hannelore Baron creates a revealing collection of art from paper and cloth she has gathered
during her lifetime in the exhibitt'The Last Ten Years:rCollages and Boxes.' Interestingly,gthe
collectibles reveal many intimate emotions, but allow room for individual interpretation.
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4

I

'The

People Could
celebration

Fly'

"
.

of Black

By Cherie Curry

THIS .WEEKEND'S SKI CLINICS TAKE PLACE:

Recall the words demanded by
Harriet Tubman, "Let my people
go," as she led thousands of slaves
to freedom. Her message was an in-
spiration. .
Though the phrase was not ex-
pressed by Tubman, the meaning
ofThe People Could Fly, a musical
adaption of one of the most well-
known Afro-American folktales, is
more understandable. The People
Could Fly tells the story of the
Afro-American people and their quest
to break the bonds of oppression and
recapture the magic of their home-
land through their music and dance.
Stephen Newby, the musical di-
rector, uses a blend of electronic and
acoustic instruments. He has ar-
ranged traditional Afro-American
spirituals, classic blues, and ragtime
favorites, along with the '60s Mo-
town sound and original composi-
tions to chronicle the development
of Black music in the United States.
This energetic musical would not
be complete without the exuberant
choreography by Linda Spriggs
(formerly of the Alvin Ailey Com-
pany), the creative talent of new-
comer and Producer Rod Gailes, and

spirit
the vibrancy of Director Elise
Bryant.
Bryant has been an artistic force
in the Ann Arbor theatre community
for the past 13 years and has demon-
strated uncanny ability to turn so-
cial/political issues into moving.
theatrical expressions.
Bryant voices nothing but enthu-
' siasm for her involvement with the
production and its members. "I have
a personal commitment to doing
shows that celebrate Afro-American
history, and utilizing the talent of
Afro-American artists," responds
Bryant when asked why she choose
to direct The People Could Fly. She
hopes that: when people leave tle
theatre, they will feel that their souls
have been fed and energized by what
is on stage.
The People Could Fly is a cel-
bration of the Afro-American spirit
and a worthy kickoff of Black His-
tory month;Share in the experience.
THE PEOPLE COULD FLY, is
presented by MYSTIC and The
Common Ground Theatre Ensemble.
Performances are tonight and Satur-
day at 8 P.M. and Sunday afternoon
at 4 P.M. at Mendelssohn Theatre.
Tickets are $10 at the door, $8 an
advance, and student tickets are $5.
Tickets are available at the Michigan
Union. For more information, call
763-0786.

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