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January 22, 1988 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-01-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-The Michigan Daily-Friday, January 22, 1988
Cagers look to
douse Spartans
BY PETER ZELLEN
Whoever goes to watch the Michigan women's basketball
team tonight at Crisler Arena, better be careful not to touch
anything green and white. They might just burn themselves
because Michigan State is HOT.
The Spartans (4-0 in the Big Ten) want to remain
unbeaten in conference play, a fact that has Michigan head
coach Bud VanDeWege concerned.
"They're going to be tough because they're playing with
a lot of confidence right now," said VanDeWege. "They've
got votes for the national top 20 which is impressive."
The Spartans leading scorer is senior forward Kim Archer,
who is averaging 14 points a game and is among the
conference leaders in rebounds and free throw percentage. In
addition, Archer leads the Big Ten in steals, with an average
of five per game.
Also daunting the Wolverines (1-3) will be Michigan
State's fiesty guard combination of 5-foot-7 Cynthia Lyons
and 5-foot-6 Carlotta Taylor. According to VanDeWege,
both are quick and play good pressure defense.
The chances of beating Michigan State appear bleak, but
VanDeWege is confident about his game plan. "We'll have
to use defense to run them down," said the Michigan coach.
"Whether it's a zone, or a man to man, we'll just have to
improve. Our emphasis will be on (stopping) the high
shooting percentages that we've been allowing lately."
Michigan ranks dead last in the Big Ten in field goal de-
fense, allowing opponents to make 55 percent of their field
goal attempts. Last weekend Ohio State and Indiana shot 63
and 58 percent from the floor, respectively, against the
Wolverines.'
Michigan is also having problems offensively. The
Wolverines are currently seventh in the Big Ten in scoring
(64 points per game) and ninth in field goal percentage (39).
The Wolverines shot 41 percent against Ohio State and 33
percent from the floor in the Indiana game.

Movin
leers look t
third place
By DOUGLAS VOLAN
The goal of the Michigan hockey
team at the beginning of the season
was to finish fourth in the Central
Collegiate Hockey Association.
Now, they're looking at third.
A mere split with Ferris State (7-
11-4 CCHA, 10-12-4 overall)
tonight and tomorrow night at Yost
Ice Arena, would move the Wolver-
ines (12-10, 16-12) into sole
possession of third place in the con-
ference.
Western Michigan, which cur-
rently leads Michigan by one point
in the standings, plays at non-con-
ference foe Air Force this weekend.
"We're hoping to move into third
place this weekend," said Michigan
defenseman Todd Copeland. "With
the talent in this league, that would
be a great accomplishment."
BUT PLAYING Ferris State is
no easy task, especially if you are
among the conference leaders. The
Bulldogs are 7-7-2 against the top
five teams in the CCHA, and in the
last three weekends of league play,
have compiled a 3-1-2 record against
the top three teams - Lake Superior
Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON State, Michigan State, and the
nd the Wolverines expect a physical series with Ferris State this Broncos.
ost Ice Arena.
Michigan tumblers to fight
tough Illinois in coed meet

kiiUp
o take over
in UCHA4
"They're real giant killers," said
Michigan forward Billy Jaffe. "We
can't look past them at all."
"It's going to be a war this
weekend," said Copeland. "The last
time they were here, we had a brawl,
and now they're playing real well."
Indeed, both teams are high. They
Bulldogs are a lot more confident
after splitting with league-leading
Lake Superior State last weekend,
and Michigan is pumped up after its
sweep of Illinois-Chicago.

Mike Moes a
weekend at Y

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"PRACTICES have been more
intense and definitely louder," said
Jaffe. "Everybody's happy and
working hard."
"It's a lot more fun when you're
winning," said Copeland. "You don't
have any losses on the back of your
mind in practice."
This new-found Wolverine confi-
dence has Ferris State head coach
John Perpich concerned. "They've
gotten stronger and are now a stable
force in the league," he said.
The Wolverines received a much
needed boost from the return of in-
jured senior right wingers Brad Mc-
Caughey and Billy Powers last weelk
in Chicago. And Bryan Deasley'
who registered a hat trick against the
Flames, said he is playing at 100
percent after missing the first eight
weeks of the season with a broken
ankle.
"EACH PLAYER that came
back, gave our team ,a lift," said
Michigan head coach Red Berenson.
"You don't.like to look at injuries in
a positive light, but it gave other
players an opportunity to play,
which increased our depth."
If Michigan is to have success
this weekend, however, they'll have
to stop the Bulldogs' top two scor-
ers, Darin Fridgen, and John de-
Pourcq. Fridgen is fifth in league
scoring, and dePourcq is tied for
tenth.
Depourcq scored four goals when
these two teams split a series in Big
Rapids last November.
Perpich's main concern is his
team's youth. With seven newcom-
ers playing regularly, Perpich feels
that the Bulldogs lack consistency.
"We're a young hockey team, so
we're going to have some ups and
downs," he said. "The difference be-
tween us and Michigan is that
Michigan is a little more mature
right now."

4

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747-7009

BY STEVEN GINNS .
Michigan's gymnasts will face a
tough test tomorrow at Crisler Arena
(1 p.m.) against Illinois in a coed
meet.
The men's squad, which finished
tenth out of 12 teams in last
weekend's Windy City Invitational
by scoring 266 points, ave their
work cut out for them against the
Fighting Illini. Illinois dominated
that meet by scoring 284 out of a
possible 300 points - an average of
9.5 per gymnast - en route to a
first-place finish.
Based-on last weekend's results,
Illinois has emerged as the clear fa-
vorite in the Big Ten race, and ac-
cording to Michigan head coach Bob

Darden, "with that score they turned
in, they probably should go to na-
tionals, if not win it."
Despite having a slim chance to
overcome the Illini, Darden remains
optimistic. "We want to be able to
give them some competition and
compete up to their level, as well as
build on that 266 score."
In contrast to the men's team, the
women's squad should have the up-
per hand over its Illinois counter-
parts.
Although the women expect a
tough match, head coach Dana
Kempthorn feels her team has an
edge over Illinois.
one factor favoring the Wolver-
ines is that Illinois will be playing

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their first meet of the year. "We've
got two meets under our belts, so
we've had the opportunity to get all
the nervousness out, and that's go-
ing to be to our advantage, said
Kempthorn.
A rare home appearance will also
help the Wolverines. This is only
one of three home meets scheduled-
for the entire year. "The girls are re-
ally fired up. We know our equip-
ment, and Crisler is a great place to
compete," explained Kempthorn.
A third advantage for Michigan is
the top-notch performances turned in
by senior Angela Williams and ju-
nior Janne Klepek so far this season.
Williams and Klepek have placed in
the top three for the Wolverines in
their two previous meets.
In addition to Williams and
Klepek, first-year stident Christine
Furlong has made a strong contribu-
tion to the team by scoring a 9.6 on
the balance beam in last week's meet
against Nebraska and Missouri.

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Fencers foil Cranbrook

Barbra Steisand
Richard Dreyfuss
N UTS(R)

MAURICE

From staff reports
Michigan's coed fencing club
foiled the Cranbrook Fencing Club
with a hard fought 16-7 victory on
Wednesday.
The team was led by Dan Glasser
in men's foil, Cynthia Praski in
women's foil, and Gunther

Lansing next weekend to play in a
tournament hosted by Michigan
State.
The club is looking for a few
men and women interested in
joining; no experienced is needed.
Interested students are invited to
attend a mass meeting on Tuesday,

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Registration begins at Ticket World and
at the Michigan Guild on January 11th.
Classes begin February 2nd. For more
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Photography
Graphics
Interior Decorating

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Even if you didn't start college on a scholarship, you
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APPLICATION DEADLINES ARE SOON!
Call (313) 764-2400 or visit the Army ROTC
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ARMY RESERVE (FFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
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TORONTO &
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3- U
What's
( Happening
Napp
Recreational Sports
LEARN TO CROSS COUNTRY SKI THIS WINTER!
Each Saturday and Sunday between January 9 and February 14,
1988 the Outdoor Recreation Program will be offering Ski Clinics
at our RADRICK FARMS NORDIC SKl CENTER (4875 Geddes)

SYMPOSIUM ON

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- Andr6 De Shields
actor, director and
choreographer
- Lonette McKee
actress and singer

BLACK
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