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January 22, 1988 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-01-22

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Page 8 -The Michigan Daily--Friday, January 22, 1988

Louis Marinaro' s

sculptures are in

perfect form

By Lauren Shapiro
Okay everyone, this is your very
last chance. Louis Marinaro's sculp-
tures on exhibit at the University of
Michigan Museum of Art will only
e showing through this weekend,
and this is a show not to be missed.
Marinaro has chosen to display
six of his finest works on the cozy
econd floor of the museum gallery.
His themes range from the
introspection and contemplation seen
in "Narcissism," "Reflection," and
r'The Wavemaker," to the miracle of
rcation seem in Marinaro's sculp-
R y

ture of Adam and Eve's first meet-
ing, "The Presentation."
Unfortunately the perfected beauty
of Marinaro's sculpture may
discourage the viewer since few of us
possess such an awesome form. The
idealized figures are unrealistic, but
Marinaro justifies this facet of his
work by stating, "We should all as-
pire to something better than our-
selves." He hopes these models will
elicit a similar kind of response from
the viewer.
The central sculpture "Reflection"
portrays the woman as a subject en-
raptured in self-contemplation. The
figure stands half-submerged in water

which ripples down to the base of
the sculpture. Deciding whether the
the woman has been caught by the
stigmas of society represented by the
water, or whether she is reaching out
for fuller gratification creates a diffi-
cult interpretation for the viewer.
But this difficulty is essential in
Marinaro's exhibit since it forces the
viewer to consider the many possible
thematic statements which the
sculptures could symbolize. Mari-
naro thinks that "Reflection" and
"Narcissism" - a smaller
interpretation of "Reflection" -
arouse feelings of "self-development"
and "coming to terms with yourself

and your venture through life."
Louis Marinaro, referred to fondly
as "Lou" by the entire museum staff,
is a professor at the University's Art
School. He teaches sculpture courses
and draws a great deal from his ex-
tensive background in anatomy and
philosophy. While he has many fa-
vorite philosophers, two he has al-
ways admired are Plato and Aristotle.
When Marinaro creates his sculp-
tures, he begins with a plaster model
and then continues to build up with
clay. Each step brings the sculptor
closer to the texture and definition he
desires. He further molds and shapes

the figure by using wax and then
occasionally, he will complete the
sculptures with a bronze finish.
Marinaro informed the docents at the
Museum that in order to better
highlight the form and contour of
the bodies, he chooses the dull finish
of wax over the shiny finish of
bronze.
All six of Marinaro's sculptures
require in-depth viewing and analy-
sis. Marinaro wants the viewer to
think of and draw unique conclusions
about the figure he has created. He
urges his audience to look beyond
the rhythmic, proportional forms of

his sculptures and into their inner
soul, their deepest thoughts. As Ed-
mund Spenser wrote, "The soul is
form and doth the body make."
LOUIS MARINARO 'S:
SCULPTURES will be showing at
the University of Michigan Museum
of Art through January 24. The Mu-
seum is located at 525 S. State
Street. Museum hours are 10 a.m.-4
pm, Tuesday-Friday and 1-5 p.m.
Saturday-Sunday. For more
information call 764-0395.

4

Books

'. (Continued from Page 7)
The National Lampoon. He should
stick to the pertinent details of his
er ft and eschew the chapters detail-
ng his love affairs, personal dis-
putes, etc.
It is difficult to assess the ulti-
mate validity of Hendra's analysis.
As a critic, he lacks objectivity. He
genuinely believes his statement -
We are the biggest and the best and

the brightest." Hendra generally de-
nies Boomer Humorist status to
those he dislikes; he attributes their
success to "the decline of Boomer
Humor." Both The David Letterman
show ("manipulative pap") and Billy
Crystal's impressions ("painfully
constructed and ...slavish") incur his
disapproval.
To sum things up - this book is
boring. It shouldn't be; Hendra has
reams of comedic information and

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experience to draw on. His long-
winded and self-serving approach to
humor, however, obscures any valu-
able insights he has to offer.
-Avra Kouffman
Them: Stalin's Polish
Puppets
By Teresa Toranska
Translated by Agnieszka
Kolakowska
larper and Row
S22.95/hardcover
Teresa Toranska's novel, Them:
Stalin's Polish Puppets, is a rivet-
ing, eye-opening series of interviews
with the leading officials in Poland
immediately following World War
Two. Under the influence of Stalin,
their deci.ions shaped the history of
postwar Poland.
Toranska is a Polish journalist
closely associated with the Solidarity
movement. The lives of her parents
and grandparents were directly influ-
enced by those she interviews, and
she is faced with the backlash of
Stal in's influence. Consea.icnn y, her
questions are pointed and brash.
They are asked with deep feeling and
oten express amazement at the an-
swers she is receiving. In fact,
Toranska is so appalled by what she
hears that the reader cannot help but
be affected also.
Her interviews begin with Julia
Minc, editor-in-chief of the Polish
Press Agency from 1944 to 1954.
Her husband, Hilary Minc, was third
in command in Poland until 1956.
From the beginning of the interview
it is obvious that Mine is a firm

create the fullest democracy and the
best systems... and we were disillu-
sioned."
The longest interview of
Toranska's investigation is with
Jakub Berman, head of the secret
police and the "brain behind the
party...its highest authority." He
held the second highest office in
Poland for ten years. Toranska's in-
terview with Berman provides a great
deal of information that would oth-
erwise not be available to the Polish
people; Berman's name was erased
from the General Encyclopedia with
his downfall in1956. It is through
Berman that Toranska gathers infor-
mation on top decisions and the ex-
tent of Stalin's power. While all
others that Toranska interviewed
claimed to have no knowledge of the
torture and deaths of the Stalin era,
Berman admits his knowledge and
tries to justify it.
Toranska's subjects generally are
caught in Stalin's Communist
rhetoric. They have gained "the abil-
ity to adapt [their] mentality and
conscience in such a way that [they]
can unreservedly accept the dogma
that the party is never wrong." In
answering Toranska's questions in
an honest and open manner, they are
attempting to justify their careers.
But Toranska often challenges the
ska righteousness of their actions and
in's corners them with cold facts they can
only answer with garbled ideological
ab jargon that makes sense to no one
igh but themselves.
irst However, the interviews are in-
er- formative and interesting character
of studies of Poland's recent leaders.
the Toranska has provided her nation
as- with historical information 'they
ida would never come across in their
the history books and has generously
shared her findings with the world.
-Jill Pisoni

, - '

Counseling Services Group

INTIMACY AND INDEPENDENCE
HOW CAN WE BE CLOSE
WITHOUT FEELING SMOTHERED
HOW CAN WE BE INDEPENDENT
WITHOUT BEING DISTANT
Call Counseling Services for a screening
appointment: 764-8312
Group Meets Tuesdays from 3:10 - 4:45 p.m.

/ p f 4f/
In the investigation 'Them: Stalin's Polish Puppets', Teresa
interviews post-World War II leaders who were influenced

Tar an
by Stal

p o wer.
believer in the Communist party.
She is offended wvhen Toranska refers
to irman (head of the secret police)
as "Mr." instead of "Comrade." Minc
is so convinced by communist
ideology that she is blind to the
rcalities of the system. When
Toranska confronts her with the
deaths of seven million peasants
during collectivization, Mink resorts
to her common reply, "I don't know
where you get that kind of informa-
tion."
Julia Minc's interview i s
characteristic of the interviews that

follow. Edward Och
spent his life in a number of h
positions, most notably as Fi
Secretary of the Party. Roman W
fel was editor-in-chief of a variety
ideological publications and later
propaganda secretary. Stefan St
ski was also a propagan
!r.tary and First Secretary of
'Narsaw Committee.
Of these, only Staszewski d
not remain a loyal follower ofi
Communist party. He tries to just
his actions by defining the socia
system in which he believed a
party "that would accord withi
interests of working people and
this nation." But when he discove
.that trials were organized on the'
sis of false teseimony and fa
accusations against innocent peop
he realized that he had "joined
party in the belief that we wot

oes
the
ify
list
sa
the
of
red
ba-
dse
ple,
the
uld

Rad
IC~moijied6

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