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January 22, 1988 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-01-22

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s *A2's Development Booi
In Weeken Magazine: Interview: Ossie Davis

m .The List John Shea

. Pick of the Week

Ninety-eight years of editoriafreedom

Vol. XCVIII, No. 78

Ann Arbor, Michigan-- Friday, January 22, 1988

Copyright 198'8, The Michigan Daily

wJJX
direc tor
responds
to report
By STEVE KNOPPER
The program director of WJJX
campus radio said yesterday that he
was "very distressed" about a Uni-
versity committee's recommendation
to investigate the radio station.
The committee, made up of Vice
President for Government Relations
Richard Kennedy and Law Prof.
Sallyanne Payton, called WJJX a
"marginal activity" in a report pub-
licly released yesterday by Interim
University President Robben Flem-
ing.
WJJX Program Director David
Monforton, an LSA junior, said the
report "just doesn't make any sense..
We are not meant to have' lots of
listeners. We want (students) to learn
how to use the equipment."
Monforton was referring to
statements in the report that said,
"Listenership has been very limited.
More important, the quality of the
training, management, and produc-
tion of the station has been
considerably below the standards that
are maintained on the other Univer-
sity stations."
Monforton said the station has
had- "trouble with the equipment,"
adding that, "because we're students,
we don't have eight hours a day to
do the work."
After the station aired allegedly
racist remarks by two students last
year; Former President Harold
Shapiro created the committee to re-
view the station.
The committee's report, which
was written last term, said WJJX
should undergo a review by a com-
mittee of faculty, students, and ad-
ministrators. The committee should
consider WJJX's purpose and
"whether or not that purpose justi-
fies its continued existence."
Fleming has not said whether he
will accept the committee's recom-
mendations.
Fleming said Wednesday that the
Campus Broadcasting Network Board
of Directors was reviewing the rec-
ommendations. Monforton, a board
member, said the board was never
informed of the recommendations.

Dorm staff
discovers

racist'

fliers

RD says pamphlets
mocked King speech

Rough going
:Michigan's Terry Mills misses a layup during the first half of the Wolverines'
C'risler Arena last night. Mills and his teammates had an unexpected tough time
story. Page!9.

By JIM PONIEWOZIK
Fliers mocking Martin Luther
King's "I Have A Dream" speech
were slipped under the doors of four
Black resident staff members at
Mosher-Jordan, according to a report
that campus security filed with Ann
Arbor police Wednesday.
The two-page fliers were placed
under the doors of the staffers - two
resident advisers, a resident director
and a minority peer advisor- be-
tween 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. last Friday
night, the report said.
Mosher-Jordan Resident Director
Billy Mann said the first page of the
flier contained a rewording of King's
speech to "advocate a racist society,"
Mann said.
The second page contained several
anti-Black statements, Mann said,
although he could not remember the
specific wording of the fliers, which
are being held by police as evidence.
"I've tried to repress the entire
incident," Mann said, after meeting
with the three other staff members
last night to discuss the incident and
prepare their public response to it.
Police have begun investigating
the incident, but have not found any
suspects or witnesses to the act, Ann
Arbor Police Sgt. Jan Suomala said.
Robert Pifer, assistant director of
University public safety and secu-
rity, said campus security normally
'andles investigations into reports of
t harassment, but decided to report the
s incident to police because it may
have involved violations of criminal
el law.
n Suomala would not speculate
s' yesterday on what laws may have
e been violated.
Pifer said security would continue
s to investigate the incident, and in-
formation would be forwarded to the
ic University Affirmative Action Of-
d fice.
Virginia Nordby, director of the
Affirmative Action Office, said yes-
terday that although the office has no

authority to discipline students for
racial harassment, it would try to
pursue the issues through "the
proper channels," such as the Uni-
versity Housing Department or po-
lice.
"If it were a student perpetrator
who had been identified, if they were
a student in a residence hall and the
incident happened in their residence
hall... there could be a lease'
termination," Nordby said.
Nordby said the University could
not punish any perpetrators under the
current student conduct rules. Interim
University President Robben Flem-
ing's proposed plan to discipline
students for acts of racism cannot be
applied because it is still in draft
form, she said.
Fleming was out of town yester-
day and could not be reached for
comment.
Nordby added that "there would be
some disciplinary action" if the pro-
posal were in force, although she
would not speculate on the form of
punishment.
Last year, a first-year student was
evicted froi University housing af-
ter he admitted to distributing a
racist flier throughout Couzens Hall.
Racist fliers telling Blacks to move
to Africa and threatening them with
hanging were also slipped under the
door of a-resident advisor in Mosher-
Jordan last spring.
Pam Nadasen, a member of the
United Coalition Against Racism,
said Friday's incident "was an attack
not just on the four students but on
the entire Black community."
Nadasen blamed the University
for "breeding an atmosphere where
students living in dorms thir.k it's
okay" to perform what she called
racist acts.
Nadasen said that, although
UCAR does not support Fleming's
disciplinary proposal, "those who are
responsible should not be held unac-
countable" for the act.

65-51 win oter Wisconsin apt
with the pesky Badgers, See

Student inmate wins Hopwood
for essay written inside prison

By LISA POLLAK
LSA sophomore Mary Glover, 33, didn't go home
to celebrate after she won a Hopwood Award on
Wednesday. She went back to prison, where she is
serving a life sentence for taking part in a 1976 murder.
In fact, when Glover - accompanied by two guards
- accepted her award at a ceremony in Rackham
Auditorium this week, it was her first time away from
the Huron Valley Women's Facility in Ypsilanti
except for court appearances, said Dick Meisler, her
writing instructor at the University.
Meisler, who met Glover while he taught prison
community college courses, helps coordinate her
education by arranging for students to bring Glover
tapes of lectures, books, and coursepacks for her

classes. She is considered a "correspondence" studen
one of two Michigan inmates who take full clas
schedules from prison, Meisler said.
Glover won S250 for an essay based on the nov
Their Eyes were watching God by Zora Neal Hurston
which she read for Meisler's English 302 class la
term. Meisler called the book "a very beautiful lov
story," adding that - like the novel's heroine -
Glover ran off to Florida with her lover when she wa
young.
"Mary is a very bright person, a very energeti
student," Meisler said. "Her work is very complete an
thorough - she puts a lot of time and energy into it.'
See HOPWOOD, Page 5

WCBN votes to accept non-student DJs

I

By DOV COHEN
After a five-hour, "extremely emotional
meeting" last night, the WCBN Board of
Directors voted to allow 13 non-student disc
jockeys on the air.
The 5-3 vote signalled an end to "nine days of
trauma" and controversy following Union
Director Frank Cianciola's orders to severely
limit WCBN's non-student staff, said CBN board
member Kevin Gilmartin.
WCBN's constitution limits non-student
participation to "a small fraction" of the staff.
Cianciola investigated the number of non-
students after a non-student DJ aired a song titled

"Run, Nigger, Run" in December.
Gilmartin praised the agreement, which
essentially cuts non-student disc jockeys from 40.
percent to 20 percent of the DJ staff, as "a very
good one."
But some WCBN representatives said the
meeting has left them with a mixed feelings.
Student DJ Jenny Olson, an LSA senior, said
she was pleased with the resolution, but said,
"It's not a complete victory."
Emily Burns, an LSA junior and board
member, said, "I don't think WCBN really won
anything, because we lost a lot of non-students."
WCBN lost 16 non-students from last term
through the agreement.

"It's kind of a hollow victory. We won, but
we didn't win anything," she said, adding that she
would like to have "a few" more non-students
brought back on the air.
Burns said she remained angry that the
University tried to implement change so
suddenly. Cianciola temporarily ordered all non-
students off the staff and required them to petition
the board to come back.
Gilmartin, however, defended the University's
actions, saying he'd rather have "nine days of
trauma and get it over with" than to have the
non-student issue "drag out" and become "more
disasterous and more injurious to CBN."

'U improves residence hall
facilities for handicapped

By HEATHER ROSE
As the first step to provide bar-
rier-free campus facilities, the Uni-
versity is installing a handicapper's
ramp at the Betsy Barbour residence
hall.
Alan Levv huildino director of

all the residence halls as fast as we
can," he said.
Six percent of University students
are mobily impaired, though none of
those students currently live in the
Barbour. Handicapped visitors must
enter thrnoh the lnding dock.

to be made accessible.
Fritz said Barbour's central loca-
tion makes it the ideal place to begin
accessibility renovation.
Funds for any housing improve-
ment project is allotted from a spe-

Pas

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