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April 19, 1988 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-04-19

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, April 19, 1988-Page 5

Tornadoes add twists
to region during April

By ERIC LEMONT
Stop your frisbee playing.
Evacuate the Diag. Take cover.
Your may not realize it, but Ann
Arbor is in the middle of Tornado
Alley, and, April is historically the
most violent tornado month of the
year in Michigan.
Tornado Alley, which stretches
from the central plains states to the
lower Great Lakes regions,
"experiences more tornadoes than
anywhere else in the world," said
Bob Snider, a meteorologist at the
Ann Arbor branch of the National
Weather Service.
"We'll find between 20 and 25
tornadoes per year in the state, 80
percent of which are found in the
Southern half," said Snider.
During the most recent tornado,
which touched down April 3 in parts
of Washtenaw County, the Univer-
sity enacted its Fan-Out Warning

System to alert residence halls about
the storm.
The residence halls were in-
structed to notify other dorms in
their area, and to tell residents to
move to lower levels of the build-
ing.
Bryan Winter, a resident director
at South Quad who helped move
residents to the basement said, "a lot
of people, especially from the East
Coast, don't know what a tornado
can do."
Winter said that even people from
the Midwest have misconceptions
about tornadoes, commonly suffer-
ing from the "I've-been-in-40-mil-
lion-tornado-warnings-and-nothing-
has-ever-happened-to-me" complex.
"Not all our residents are from
Michigan or Kansas," said Darlene

Ray Johnson, building director at
Couzens. "They don't know what to
do when the sky turns green."
The tornado earlier this month
was classified on the Fujita Wind
Scale as an F-1 tornado, with winds
between 73-112 mph. An average of
17 tornadoes occur in Michigan a
year. Although April's tornadoes are
the most violent, tornadoes are more
prevalent in June.
During the tornado warning on
campus earlier this month, Johnson
said the only problem came from
"people who were curious and
wanted to look out the windows."
Residence staff were unable to force
students to go downstairs. "There-
was nothing to hold over their head
See Tornado, Page 7

Spring fling Daily Photo by DAVID LUBLINER
LSA sophomore Steve Lubell hurls a wet sponge at an unidentified person posing as the Domino's pizza Noid
yesterday on the Diag during the charity sponge toss sponsored by Pi Lambda Phi fraternity. Proceeds from
the event went to "Jazz for Life."

City seeks funds to expand housing .
By PETER MOONEY $1.8M proposal would triple Thursday to endorse the 'Y' expa

One Month's
Free Rent
Albert Terrace 1506 Geddes
1700 Geddes

I

an-

Low-income housing in Ann Ar-
bor will significantly increase if the
city finds funding for a proposal to
triple the number of rooms available
for subsidized housing at the
YMCA.
The city's Community Develop-
ment Department is looking for
funding sources to finance the pro-
ject that would increase the number
of rooms at the 'Y' from 37 to 100
at an estimated cost of $1.8 million.
The department's study, to be
completed by next fall, will deter-
mine whether the project is feasible.
THERE ARE about 500 hun-
dred low-income people in the city
who need subsidized housing, said
Larry Friedman, planning coordina-
tor of the Community Development
Department. This number was culled
from waiting lists for Ann Arbor's
public housing projects and other
subsidized housing units.
Summer
Jobs
Available
- All Office Skills Needed
- Your Choice of Location in
Detroit Metro Area
* Wor-kas Much as You Want
Where You Want
*No Fees
Scott Group, Inc.
736 S. Washington
Royal Oak - 542-9232
Hours: Mon-Fri 8:30-5:00

room space at Ann Arbor 'Y'

One of the details being ironed
out is who would be allowed to live
in the new rooms. Currently, the 'Y'
has no requirement that potential
tenants prove they are low-income
- previous proposals have included
means testing.
The proposal would add three
floors and fund a renovation of the
building's lobby. An architect for
the project will be selected in May
and - if financing comes through
- the addition is scheduled to be
completed in October, 1989.
Potential sources of funding for
the project include federal Commu-
nity Development Block Grants,
state funding through the Michigan
State Housing and Development
Authority, and private donations,

Friedman said.
W I T H O U T state or federal
backing, local banks would be un-
likely to loan the 'Y' the money
needed to make the project a reality,
Friedman said. He added that "the
city may be asked to guarantee the
mortgage."
Such a guarantee could result in
the city making monthly loan pay-
ments if the rooms aren't all occu-
pied or if increased maintenance
costs exceed expectations.
The Community Development
Department began its work after
Mayor Gerald Jernigan and coun-
cilmember Larry Hunter (D-1st
Ward) brought the proposal to the
YMCA's board in January. The city
council passed a resolution last

slon.
HUNTER said council is ex-
ploring whether they can use any
city funds for the project.
But complaints are coming from
backers of a proposed Liberty Street
single-room occupancy building that
narrowly failed to win council ap-
proval.
They say that the Liberty Street
project would have been cheaper than
the 'Y' proposal, because the devel-
oper had committed to put up 50
percent of the funds.
"It (the YMCA expansion) will
be much more expensive per unit,"
than the Liberty Street project,
councilmember Liz Brater (D-3rd
Ward), who supports the project,
said.

Heat &
Water
Included

A":: ++~
~0~

Spacious 2 Bedroom Bi-Levels

Large 2 Bedroom Apartments

Furnished
Air conditioned
Laundry Facilities
Parking for Tenants
543 Church Street
(313) 761-1523
We also have other great properties!
which are centrally located to campus

Yes
we're
open
Saturdays

ISRAEL'S 40TH featuring...
A CONCERT BY "THE GATHERING"
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 8PM

ann arbor cantata singers p.o. box 8147 . ann arbor, michigan 48107
THE ANN ARBOR CANTATA SINGERS
Johann Sebastian Bach's

ono

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MINOR

MASS

5:30pm Anderson Room,
Michigan Union
Community wide memorial
service for the fallen
soldiers of Israel.

6:45pm Michigan Theater
Reception for all who wish
to sample Middle Eastern
munchies.

t h
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8:00pm Michigan Theater
Concert by "The Gather-
ing" one of Israel's most
original
groups, which has created
a new form of Israeli music.

Sunday, April 24, 4:00 p.m.
First Conregational Church

i_.._

608 E.

Concert Tickets available at Michigan Theater:
$12, $8 and $5 (students and senior citizens).
Group discounts/ credit card orders : 668-8397.
Co-sponsored by the JCA/UJA.

William at S. State
Tickets are $12.00 ($10.00 students and
seniors), at the door or in advance by
calling 662-3395 or 665-2008.

z EMOVmomw

Michian Council
for th' Arts

1mM

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b.,

3 _ _

THE NEW YEARBOO]
ARE HERE!! THE NE
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IF INTERESTED ATTEND AN
INFORMATIONAL MEETING AT:

The 1988 Michigan Ensians are
in and available for pick-up at the
Student Publications Building,
An 1-.A CA.. v __ '_ -1 _.

I

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