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April 15, 1988 - Image 10

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-04-15

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Spring Football Game
Tomorrow, 1 p.m.
Michigan Stadium
Tickets: $2 for adults,
$1 for students and children

SPORTS

Club Crew
12th Anniversary Regatta
Tomorrow, 12 noon
Gallup Park

The Michigan Daily

Friday, April 15, 1988

Page 10

Package of money
traced to Kentucky

~ J EESPN hits broadcasting mark
a®lwith NHL playoff coverage

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP)--
Kentucky assistant coach Dwayne
Casey declined, when given the
opportunity, to deny that he sent
$1, 000 by mail to the father of
high school standout Chris Mills.
Casey, in Louisiana to inter-
view for the head coaching job at
the University of New Orleans,
was asked by reporters how he
would reply to the question: "Did
you send the money?"
"I would say, No comment,"
Casey responded.
Casey continued, "Anytime
you're recruiting, you're going to
have a lot of allegations, innuen-
dos and assumptions. The situa-
tion everyone is talking about is
very unfortunate. It is one of the
many that's been going on all year
long. The school is investigat-
ing, the NCAA is investigating
and the ultimate thing is to wait

and see what they come up with."
The Los Angeles Daily News
reported in a copyright story in
Thursday's editions that workers at
an Emery worldwide air freight
distribution center in Los Angeles
discovered the money in a package
addressed to Claude Mills, the fa-
ther of the Kentucky signee, when
it accidently opened.
The package, according to
records, was sent by Casey on
March 30. The money allegedly
was contained in a videotape of
the younger Mills playing
basketball, that Casey was return-
ing.
Mills, a 6-foot-7 Parade All-
American who signed with Ken-
tucky on Nov. 11, was in Albu-
querque, New Mexico, practicing
for the McDonald's All-American
Classic to be played this Sunday.

By DAVID HYMAN
Now that spring has arrived, sports viewers
must adjust to the new television sports lineup.
It will be five months before we see NFL
football and another six months before we have a
chance to view college hoops and hear non-stop
blabber mouth Dick Vitale.
Now the only exciting sporting events com-
ing up on the major networks are the Kentucky
Derby, the Indianapolis 500, and the NBA play-
offs.
The only other choices are Good Fishing -
Lake Trout from Montana's Flathead Reservoir
and PBA bowling on Channel 7.
ESPN, the 24-hour sports network, must re-
sort to showing these cliff-hanger events since
there is no more basketball or football.
Now showing on ESPN are Speed Week,
High School Dance Team, and the highly com-
petitive Tractor Pull. What in the world is Dance
Team and what it is about?
Another question. Where do these tractor
pullers practice? Do they have a practice field on
the farm?
Although ESPN nemally falls into this
lackluster off-season boredom, once in a while
something exciting shows up. ESPN's coverage
of the NHL playoffs is a first-class sports
production.

The cable network's playoff coverage so far
has equaled its basketball 'March Madness.'
ESPN's switching from one divisional battle to
the another is more than a hockey fan could ask
for.
THIS PAST week and a half's coverage has
been superb. Producer Bryan Cooper has done an
excellent job of showing updates and bits of
other games. In addition to one main telecast
each night., every other game can be seen at one
point or another as viewers are taken to the
ESPN studio with Tom Mees who relays scores
from around the league.
Every goal, every penalty shot (Yes, there al-
ready have been two called in the playoffs) and
every great save is shown. Nothing is missed.
Even the most disinterested viewer wonders when
Mees gets to take a break or just go to the bath-
room.
THE SPORT of hockey is unfamiliar to
most because it has no major television contract.
It was last seen on CBS during the 1980 Stanley
Cup. Most people only see hockey every four
years during the Olympics.
After the 1980 miracle, Americans have had a
keen interest in watching hockey. Those people
who were disappointed with the Olympic team's

performance should tune into ESPN and see what
hockey is really about.
Announcers Mike Emrick and Bill Clement
have been smooth throughout, making it pleas-
ant to watch the playoffs and have been informa-
tive. Clement, a former NHL player from the
70s, provides meaningful insight to viewers.
Emrick announces the game well and says the
right thing.
ESPN has mastered covering playoffs. Be-
cause ESPN's type of coverage sparks such wide
approval, TBS will adopt this type of format for
the upcoming NBA playoffs.
ESPN HAS shown that the viewers like to
see a wide variety of games, even if it is not the
top teams or their home team. ESPN's ratings
have increased 83 percent from last year. With
the never ending updates, viewers can still follow
how the home team is doing. ESPN is not stuck
on showing Wayne Gretzky, the Canadiens, or
the Flyers. They keep their schedule open unlike
the coverage of the NBA by CBS.
After a night of hockey on ESPN, the fun
and festivities have only just begun. Sit back,
relax and enjoy the Sportscenter with Chris
Berman. His nicknames of baseball players will
only add to the already great coverage provided by
ESPN.

I

Peter Locke & Jim Buckley Present A Mammoth Films Release I

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Wednesday, April 20 7:30
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$3.00 at door
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Jerry Gonzales of the Fort Apache
Band demonstrate the special
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sponsored by Eclipse Jazz

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"An entertaining whodunit with Peter Ustinov in fine form."
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