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April 15, 1988 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1988-04-15

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Protest
Continued from Page 1
Phillips, an LSA junior. "Just pay
your (tuition), get the hell out in
four years, and give money when
you're an alumni... that's all they
want."
"Today's (protest) has two main
themes: stopping administrative
control over students' lives, and
stopping discrimination," said
Rackham graduate student Henry
Park.
UNIVERSITY Director of
News and Information Services
Joseph Owsley said he was struck in
the eye by a protester who was
trying to force his way onto an
elevator. The unidentified protester,
who Owsley identified as a male in
his early mid-twenties, ran away
immediately after striking him, he
said.
"I'm disturbed at the violent
trend that the students are following
these days," Owsley said. "They
seem to particularly like to pick on
people thirty or forty years older
than they are."
Some protesters charged that they
were assaulted by University's
Director of Communications Keith
Molin. LSA senior Virginia
McCulloh said Molin shoved her
against the stairway railing. She
filed a complaint with the
University's Ombudsperson Don
Perigo..
"(Molin) was swinging fists

The Michigan Daily-Friday, April 15, 1988- Page 5
Civil rights panel to

hold inquiry
By JIM PONIEWOZIK respons
Spurred by a rising number of cidents
racist incidents at colleges around the not onl
country, the Michigan Civil Rights nation,'
Commission will hold a public in- The
quiry today on discrimination at the p.m.- to
University. LSA bu.
This is the first time the com- In a
mission - a state organization Univer
which assists individuals with com- commi
plaints of discrimination - has in- at today
vestigated discrimination on college facultyo
campuses. TheI
At today's session, the first of quiriesa
five the group will hold at colleges sity in
around the state, commission mem- Univers
bers will hear testimonies from all plans to
interested on a walk-in basis. the De
The panel hopes to use the testi-
monies they will gather during the
next two months to form recom-
mendations on ways public
universities can combat harassment
based on race, national origin, reli-
gion, and age.
Any recommendations they make,
however, will not be binding, Dis-
trict Executive Carol Bowen said.
The inquiries were scheduled as a

today
se to "the proliferation of in-
of overt racism on campuses
y in this state but across tho
she said.
inquiry will be held from 3
o 6 p.m. in room 2553 of the
wilding.
ddition to members of the
rsity community, the
ssion is soliciting testimony
y's inquiry from students and
at several other area colleges.
group has also scheduled in-
at Western Michigan Univer,
Kalamazoo and Ferris Stat4
sity in Big Rapids. It also
schedule similar inquiries in
roit and Lansing areas.
THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557

Doily Photo by KAREN HANDELMAN.
Demonstrators shout at a rally yesterday on the Diag before marching to the Board of Regents meeting. In
front are, left to right, Rackham student Christopher Coen, LSA junior Hobie Perry, and LSA senior Eric

Rosenberg.
when we were going throught the
doorway," said Peter Asztalos, a
student at Ann Arbor Community
High School. "He was doing his
best to push (McCulloh) down the
stairs."
BUT MOLIN said the charges
were "absurd," and that he was trying
to move McCulloh to one side of
the stairwell to create a path of
access for building employees.
Molin said he was attacked by
protesters.
About 80 people gathered on the

Diag for the anti-administration rally
at noon. Speakers from several
campus organizations, including
MSA, the University of Michigan
Asian Students Coalition, and the
Lesbian and Gay Rights Organizing
Committee chastized the
administration for passing the anti-
discrimination policy and for its
handling of minority issues.
"When the University tells you
they can't let in more minorities
because it'll lower their standards,
that's oppression," said Rackham

student and MSA rep. Corey
Dolgon, referring to remarks made
earlier this year by LSA Dean Peter
Steiner about underrepresentation of
minorities here.
The protesters also called for the
resignations of Fleming, Steiner,
who has been charged by some
students and faculty with making
racist remarks, and Regent Deane
Baker (R-Ann Arbor), who they
charged with being racist and
homophobic.
-Daily staffer Melissa Ramsdell
contributed to this report.

WAND asks regents to end weapons research

By DAVID SCHWARTZ
A co-coordinator of the campus
chapter of the Women's Action for
Nuclear Disarmament yesterday pre-
sented the University's Board of Re-
gents with 800 postcards demanding
an end to weapons research on cam-
pus.
Handing two large boxes filled
with cards to Vice President for Stu-
dent Services Henry Johnson, LSA
senior Devon Anderson criticized the
regents for allowing weapons re-
search to take place without solicit-
ing student opinions. "It has become
the responsibility of students to or-
ganize and bring our input to you,"
Anderson said.
Chilean
a injustices
By LIZ ROHAN
The people of Chile have experi-
enced physical and violent repression
since ,Augusto Pinochet Ugarte
gained power in 1973, said speakers
at a forum yesterday.
The forum was organized by the
campus Amnesty International to
educate people about injustices in
Chile. Philosophy Prof. Peter Ya-
zoo, forum organizer, said that five
notable Chilean citizens mysteri-
ously disappeared this September,
and 25 members of the Chilean
artistic community have been
threatened with death by the Chilean
authorities.
"The cultural community is un-
der scrutiny and that's why the de-
velopments in Chile are of particular
interest," Yazoo said in an interview
before the forum.
English Prof. William Alexander
presented slides of Chilean murals
and videos of plays, all of which re-
flect the artists' frustration and op-
pression under the present regime.
Eliana Maya-Raggio, director of
the Residential College's Spanish
Program, explained that in Chile,
the artist's role is to perpetuate the
memory of a democratic past - a
memory the government attempts to
suppress.
A University professor from
Chile, who asked not to be named,
explained that the Pinochet dictator-
ship destroyed all democratic prac-
tices in the Chilean educational sys-
tem, "The education system is geared
to produce an obedient person who
can exist in a military dictatorship,"
she said.
CORRECTION
The purpose of a mock wedding

She presented the cards and spoke
during the public comments session
of yesterday's regents' meeting.
Students, faculty, and alumni, in
signing the cards, vowed not to
make any donations to the Univer-
sity until the regents adopt accept-
able guidelines prohibiting weapons
research.
The current guidelines, passed last
April by the regents, call for research
to be conducted at the University
only if it is "aimed at enhancing
human life and the human condi-
tion."
Interim University President
Robben Fleming declined to com-
ment about weapons research on

campus, saying he had not examined
the University's research guidelines
or the postcards.
Regents interviewed also refused
comment on any impact the post-
cards might have on University fi-
nances or the research guidelines.
Two regents did say that they see no
problems with the current research
taking place on campus.
Regent Neil Neilson (R-Brighton)
acknowledged that research funded by
the defense department is being con-
ducted on campus, but said that he is
"not upset" that such projects are
being done.
In other matters brought up at the
public comments session, Col.

Charles Tackett implored the regents
to allow a rally on the Diag which
would commemorate Vietnam veter-
ans.

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