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November 20, 1987 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Engin.
counrl
elects
officers
(Continued from Page 1)
name off were uncounted, votes cast
by LSA students for MSA
representatives and on the two
referendum questions were counted.
The two referendum questions,
which were uncounted at press time,
dealt with MSA's steering
committee and its six internal
committees. The first question asked
voters whether non-assembly
representatives could assume the
position of vice chairs of MSA
internal committees, such as Budget
Priorities and Rules and Elections.
As the MSA constitution
currently reads, only assembly
representatives may serve as vice-
chairs of these committees.
Committee chairs must be assembly
representatives.
The second question asked voters
to reduce the assembly's steering
committee quorum to a simple
majority instead of the current two-
thirds. The steering committee,
which sets the agenda for assembly
meetings, is a body comprised of the
Wtwelvye committee chairs, the
president, vice president, and
treasurer.
Both resolutions need 60 percent
of the vote to pass.
In the College of Engineering
elections, Cathy Kilborn, an
Engineering junior, was elected
president of the school's student
body government, the Engineering
1 Council.
Kilborn attracted 203 votes,
defeating other presidential hopefuls
Greg Martin and Ken Kociba, who
received 106 and 50 votes
respectively.
See RSG, Page 5

The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 20, 1987- Page 3
Group waits to
debate condom

machines at

U,

Fresh tart Dily Photo by ANDI SCHREIBER
Fresh start Lay itob
Ann Arbor Mayor Gerald Jernigan, a Republican, presents one-day-old Jamie Hale with a T-shirt that reads,
"I'm a born non-smoker." Jamie's mother, Barbara Hale, looks on. The mayor's visit marks the celebration
of the American Cancer Society's "Great American Smokeout," an annual attempt to get people to quit
smoking.
Dorm cafe design wins awards

By LISA POLLAK
The Michigan Student Assem-
bly's health issues committee will
neither advocate nor oppose the in-
stallation of condom vending ma-
chines on campus at next Tuesday's
MSA meeting, committee chair
Dennis Lopez said yesterday.
Speaking at a Select Committee
on Student Health Issues meeting,
Lopez said, "Although some of us
do have strong feelings against the
machines, I think it's more impor-
tant that we just give MSA some
issues and information to think
about. This is a very sensitive topic,
and not one for this committee to
decide alone."
The assembly will consider the
committee's research before taking a
stand on the machines - which
have aleady been installed at schools
including Amherst, Columbia,
Michigan Tech, and Arizona State.
Committee members were
specifically concerned about the high
cost - 75 cents apiece - of vend-
ing machine condoms. At University
Health Services, students can buy a
dozen condoms for $3.50, said health
service representative Robin Sarrs.
Other members questioned the
quality of the machine condoms,
which they said can become stale and
ineffective if left inside the machines
too long.
Those two issues were cited by
University AIDS Education Coordi-
nator Polly Paulson last week when
she said, "The health service and

housing departments have decided
not to use the machines." But stu
dents had not lobbied for the ma-
chines at that time, she added.
"Besides quality control and cost,
we're hoping MSA will think about
the issue of education," said Bill
McCaughrin, a public health stu-
dent. "That won't come from the
machines unless you dispense
printed information with the con-
doms."
Countered public health student
Robin Speis, "When you go into a
drugstore to buy condoms, do they
give you education there?"
Lopez said the ultimate decision
whether to install the machines must
be made by the administrators in
charge of the possible machine sites,
such as residence halls. Residence
Hall Education Coordinator Marvin
Parnes has already said he does not.
favor the machines.
At Michigan State University,
where the student assembly is still.
considering their stance on the ma-.
chines, students have already "met a
great deal of resistance from
administrators who are terribly wor-
ried about parent and student reac-
tions," said assembly chair Randy
Hannan. "It would obviously be a
battle to get them;"
The health issues committee was
formed last month to give students
an opportunity to improve their
health care and insurance on campus..
The members consists primarily of
students from the schools of Public
Health, Pharmacy, and Nursing.

By ALYSSA LUSTIGMAN
The neon lights beam "salad,"
"entrees" and "soup" from behind
stencilled metallic signs in South
Quad's renovated cafeteria. Students
chatter while they hang out around
small wooden tables and booths,
surrounded by salmon/mint green
walls.
"It's wacky, it's flashy, it's
tacky, it's neon," art school
sophomore Gail Shusterman said of
the new 1950s-style dining hall.
This and two other dining hall
renovations won awards for
University interior designers in an
Association of University Interior

Designers competition.
"The awards mean we have the
best housing group in the country,"
said Joan Metzger, the senior interior
designer for the University's
Housing Design Group.
The designs were chosen from
entries by 35 universities that
entered the competition, which took
place the first week in October.
South Quad's dining room won
first place and best-of-show in the
category for renovations that cost
more than $25,000. The actual
renovation, which started last May
and finished in September, cost
between $550,000 to $570,000, said

George San Facon, director of
housing physical properties.
All the renovations tried to
reflect the time period of t h e
buildings' construction. The dining
hall in South Quad, built in the
1950s, was a take-off of that time
period, said Kelly Ellis, South Quad
dining hall designer.
"We tried to make the
environment better for students," she
said. "It's a fun spot - a soda shop
type image."
Both revisions of Stockwell Hall
and Betsey Barbour's dining halls
worked around their traditional
See S. QUAD, Page 5

i

Witness says plane's

Regents approve new
LSA dean position

flaps were
ROMULUS (AP) - The Na-
tional Transportation Safety Board
said yesterday it is willing to talk to
another airline first officer who says
the flaps on Northwest Airlines
Flight 255 were extended as it accel-
erated for a takeoff that failed, killing
156 people.
Two written statements by
Northwest First Officer Winifred
Jenista were released by the Air Line
Pilots Association yesterday as the
NTSB hearing into the Aug. 16
crash at Detroit Metropolitan Airport
drew to a close.
A probable cause into the second-
deadliest disaster in U.S. aviation
history- behind a DC-10 crash in
Chicago on May 25, 1979, that
killed 275 people- isn't expected
before spring.
Jenista's statements- one writ-
ten a few days after the crash and the
other dated Wednesday- were deliv-
ered to the NTSB about 11 p.m.
Wednesday, board chairman Alan
Pollock said.
He said if the ALPA produced
NSC
adOsors
inquiries
(Continued from Page i)
ransom operation.
The Iran-Contra report provides
some new details of efforts in 1985
and 1986 by Poindexter, a former
national security adviser to President
Reagan, and fired National Security
Council staffer North to monitor and
in some instances impede criminal
investigations..
The investigations had the poten-
tial for uncovering the NSC's role in
overseeing the private Contra sup-
port network at a time when U.S.
military aid for the rebels had been
cut off by congress, the report said.
In one instance, the NSC staff
tried to persuade the Justice Depart-
ment in 1986 to reward an official
of a Central American country who
h - 1.n ^. V%.4d ceh 1.4. ofnnti , t

extended
Jenista, the board would question
her. Jenista's name doesn't appear on
a list of 133 witnesses interviewed
by NTSB before the hearing began.
But Pollock said that list did not
contain all the names of people in-
terviewed in the three months since
the crash.
The focus of the NTSB
investigation has been whether the
doomed MD-80's flaps were ex-
tended. The MD-80 is a stretch
version of the DC-9.
Flaps, which are panels on the
trailing edge of a wing, and slats,
which are panels on the leading wing
edge, give added lift when extended.
Witnesses in the hearing have said
the flaps on Flight 255 should have
been set at 11 degrees considering
the weather and the load level of the
plane.
Preliminary NTSB reports have
said the flap control lever, the flight
data recorder and a reconstruction of
the wings indicated the flaps were
retracted.

The University's Board o f
Regents yesterday approved the
creation of an LSA administration
position to improve the quality of
education for first-year students and
sophomores.
"In LSA, we're working on the
curriculum," said LSA Associate
Dean Jack Meiland. "We're looking
for ways to make the undergraduate
experience better."
Starting this January, the
Assistant Dean for the Freshman and

Sophomore years - who has not
yet been named - will be
responsible for the foreign language
program, LSA first-year seminars,
and assessing the overcrowding of
LSA courses.
"(The dean) certainly will help in
trying to assist students' specific
needs," said LSA Student
Government Vice President Mike
Nelson, an LSA junior.
By Martha Sevetson

Officials doubt pilot safety

WASHINGTON (AP) - The
major airlines have been easing their
hiring requirements in recent years
because of the need for thousands of
new pilots, and some aviation safety
officials worry about the decline in
cockpit experience.
Pilot inexperience has been raised
as a possible factor in last Sunday's

crash in Denver of a Continental
Airlines DC-9 after it was disclosed
that both the captain and co-pilot had
only recently begun flying that typea
of jetliner.
Spokesmen for the airline disputed
suggestions that the two pilots' fly-"
ing background was unusual, calling
it "the norm in the industry."

-Associated Press
Grieving
Four women comfort each other after the funeral services for William
Charles Spalsbury who was killed in Sunday's Continental Airlines crash
at Denver's Stapleton Airport. The services were held in Evergreen,
Colorado.

MAC IN THE MORNING
~ 5
MAC IN THE EVENING
MAC AROUND THE CLOCK
kin kos
MACINTOSH CENTER
" FULL-SERVICE LASERSETTING "
RESUME SPECIALS
540 EAST LIBERTY STREET ANN ARBOR
Corner of Liberty and Maynard
761-4539

etui te
CANTERBURY HOUSE
Sunday Schedule
(The Chaplaincy of the
Episcopal Church to the
U-MCommunity)
218 N. Division St.
Lunch following the
10:00 a.m. Eucharist
at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church
(across from Canterbury House)
2:00 pam. Episcopal/Anglican Worship
Holy Eucharist
East Lounge, Bursley Hall
5:00 p.m. Eucharist at Canterbury
(supper follows)

nI
f (#44 'V &d .M. r/
COOKIES
ENJOY THEUofMvs. O.S.U.
I GAME WITH A DOZEN OF
* MRS. PEABODY'S AWARD
I WINNING COOKIES.
1 $1.00 off a dozen with coupon. I
761-CHIP
I 715 N. UNIVERSITY OPEN DAILY OFFER EXPIRES
* 1227S. UNIVERSITY TILL 11:00 P.M. 11/22/87 U
*mmmmmo mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmuo o oo oo

!"- - - -- ~n-- - - -- ------- -------~---------- 1

ENGINEERING MAJORS!

Q

Hns

drawing boards
scales & rulers
computation pad
cross-section pads
comp books

programmable
calculators
diskettes
drafting tables
mechanical pens

"PRE-THANKSGIVING"

.I

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