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November 13, 1987 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-11-13

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 13, 1987- Page 3
Fuss over judge's past a
smokescreen, profs. say

By JAMES BRAY
Trying marijuana in college cost
Judge Douglas Ginsburg a seat on
the United States Supreme Court.
But many University faculty
members and students feel 1980s
conservatism is what really burned
Ginsburg.
It was all an image problem with
conservative backers, said Law Prof.
Thomas Kauper. "(Ginsburg's
nomination) would be a n
embarrassment to the president," he
said.
"In another setting, with another
president, it might be of the greatest
irrelevance in the world," Kauper
said. He added, "If incidental use of
marijuana is going to be a factor, it
will disqualify a whole generation."
Philosophy Prof. Carl Cohen
said that Ginsburg - who withdrew
from the Supreme Court nomination
- was in fact "denied" the
nomination by the "blatant
hypocrisy" of his critics.
Critics used Ginsburg's past
marijuana use, which he said
occurred in the 1960s and as late as
1979, in order to destroy the
nomination, Cohen said. They were
POLICE
NOTES

'If incidental use of marijuana is going to be a factor, it
will disqualify a whole generation.'
- Law Prof. Thomas Kauper
"inappropriately puritanical behind following intensified disapproval of
their smirks," he added. the drug, the studies showed.
"Most people are quite ready tc
admit that a substantial number of Despite today's increasingly
citizens smoke marijuana," he said negative attitude toward marijuana, a
But Jerald Bachman, of the Gallup poll conducted after the
University's Institute of Social Ginsburg incident revealed that 62
Research, said annual studies have percent of Americans polled felt he
shown that more people disapprove should not be rejected because of
of marijuana use than in the late past marijuana use.
1970s. "The climate has been
changing and people are less inclined "I definitely don't think it should
to use it," said Bachman, adding that be an issue," said Becca Miki, a
"it is more frequently disapproved Residential College junior. She did
then it was in the late '70s." not feel that smoking marijuana was
Bachman has conducted surveys perceived negatively on campus.
indicating that more than half of Mark Wood, a first year law
high school students in 1986 had school student, said, "It is ridiculous
tried smoking marijuana. According to think that our public officials
to the surveys, high school have not used marijuana, especially
experimentation with marijuana from that generation." He added, "the
peaked in 1979 and 1980 at about 60 Supreme Court justice is a unique
percent. Marijuana use consistently position so we might have to hold
dropped off from year to year them to higher standards."
ASIAN AMERICAN JOURNALISTS ASSOCIATION
and UM MINORITY SERVICES
presents:
JOURNALISM FORUM
professional Asian American Journalists will speak on
Asian Americans in the news media

Daily Photo by ANDI SCHREIBER
Browsing
LSA senior Berta Alvardo examines the "Celebrate Diversity" bulletin board in the front lobby of the UGLI.
The UGLi's Peer Information Counseling program arranged the display of new book covers to promote
cultural diversity at the University.
Student Movement partvies
for four seats in MSA election

(Contnued from Page 1)
home."
"As the student government on
campus, I don't think it carries the
voice it can," he said.
Party members enumerated
traditional campus concerns like the
code, financial aid, and the high ratio
of students to teaching assistants as
issues the assembly needs to deal
with.
But compared to the other parties,
Student Movement takes a slightly
different stance on these campus

issues. While standing firmly
against the proposed code of non-
academic conduct, the party opposes
a mandatory University class on
racism, sexism, and classism.
They favor instead making the
class available, but not required.
Increasing student awareness and
sensitivity about racism is a key to
solving the problem, Aaron said.
The party also opposes deputizing
the University's security force, but
would like to see a deputized "senior
officer" who would wear a gun and

be available in emergency situations.
"They (MSA members) are either
not in line with what students want
or they're not addressing issues
students care about," he said.
Aaron said the assembly should
be better publicized; weekly campus
reports by the MSA president, he
said, could put students better in
touch with the group.
"Through awareness, MSA will
become a stronger representative of
the student body," he added.

Students challenge CLB statement

Break-ins
Ann Arbor police are
investigating several campus-area
break-ins, Sgt. Jan Suomala said. A
suspect entered a building in the
1400 block of Hubbard Street
through an unlocked door Tuesday
night and stole a backpack, purse,
and cash worth $250.
Also on Tuesday, an intruder
entered a building in the 1000 block
of Highland Drive and stole an
answering machine and a wallet
valued at $100.
On Monday, a woman awoke to
find two men in her bedroom,
located in the 200 block of
Observatory St. The men fled and a
watch and jewelry valued under $50
were reported missing.
A suspect pried a door at the
carport on Hill Street and took a
phone and empty cash box Sunday
evening.
. Police are also investigating an
incident last Saturday in which a
suspect broke a window in the 1100
block of Neilsen Court and stole
clothing valued at more than $100.
by Steve Blonder

9 internship information

(Continued from Page 1)
protesters freedom of expression but
said, "The old one was worse and
this one is bad."
Students fear the statement will
give: the University the power to
interpret infractions of freedom of
speech and to judge and punish
students.
But Railton said although the
policy gives the University president
final responsibility for use of the
guidelines and sanctions to enforce
them, the guidelines do not set up
mechanisms for enforcement. In this
way, .said Railton, the statement is
not a code of nonacademic conduct.
Railton said CLB has traditionally
taken a stand against the implemen-
tation of the proposed code..
The new statement is meant to
serve as the University's
philosophical position on freedom of
speech. It incorporates free
expression, with a concern for
civility to the speaker and the
audience, Railton said.
Railton hopes the new policy

" info. on UM student
news organizations

v

could be used by students, as well as
administrators, to protect their
rights. "We would hope this is a
document students could approve,"
he said.
The Senate Advisory Committee
on University Affairs, the faculty's
advisory committee, has not
formally approved the statement, but
will discuss it in Monday's Senate
Assembly meeting.
SACUA chair Harris
McClamroch said he feels the new
guidelines are "carefully crafted and

thoughtfully stated," and are
improvements upon the current
policy.
"I think by and large it's a good
start. I support what it's attempting
to do. I support by and large its
wording,"'he said.
The forum will take place
between 3:30 and 5:30 p.m. in room
220, Hutchins Hall. CLB is seeking
approval from MSA, SACUA, and
the University's executive officers
before it passes the statement.

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