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November 12, 1987 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-11-12

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, November 12, 1987-Page 5

Former South African
prisoners recall torture

By PETER MOONEY
Nomgcobo Sangweni organized a women's rights
group at the University of Natal in South Africa. In
December 1986 she was arrested.
She was kept in prison under a law that allows
prisoners to be held indefinitely for interrogation.
Prison guards forced Sangweni to stand for 14
straight hours during one interrogation and, in another
instance, beat her so badly that she was unable to walk.
After she was released in May, 1987, she was taken
to the hospital and doctors found a substance that they
were unable to identify but which Sangweni believes
was used to debilitate her.
Sangweni and Father Casimir Paulsen spoke before
an audience of 150 in the Michigan Union last night in
an event sponsored by Amnesty International USA,
which lobbied for the release of both.
Sangweni now lives in the United States and attends
Hunter College in New York.
She said that she was never told why she was im-
prisoned.
"Either you fight or you submit, and I was not pre-
pared to submit," she said.
Paulsen was arrested in December of 1986 and held
for three months. Guards tortured Paulsen during his
imprisonment, he said.

"They had reason to suspect I'm a subversive be-
cause I said (the South African) government is for the
birds," Paulsen said.
Paulsen works with Black South Africans in
Transkei, one of several tribal homelands created by the
South African government.
Because of a lack of jobs in the homelands, Paulsen
said, many Blacks are forced to find work far from their
homes.
"Seventy percent of the men I work with had to
leave their families under the migrant labor system to
work in the mines," he said.
Paulsen went to South Africa in 1966 to work as
the chaplain at the University of Transkei and was de-
ported in 1971. He lived in the Detroit area and worked
in a Ford plant before returning to South Africa in
1978.
The efforts of Amnesty International, Polish-
American organizations, and Michigan Democratic
senators Don Riegle and Carl Levin were instrumental
in achieving his release, Paulsen said.
Tom Algeo, a member of Amnesty Group 61, said
that though the group's efforts don't always result in
the release of prisoners, it "almost always has the effect
of improving the conditions of imprisonment."

Daily Photo by KAREN HANDELMAN
Nomgcobo Sangweni relates her experiences as a South African political prisoner in a speech yesterday in the
Michigan Union's Anderson Room.

Citizens honor
veterans and i

By The Associated Press
Former soldiers struggled into
their old uniforms to march in pa-
rades, and monuments were dedicated
to fallen servicemen yesterday as the
nation observed Veterans Day, a day
of pride for some, of remembrance
for others.
And for some, it was a day of
learning. Across the San Francisco
Bay area, children met with inpatient
and outpatient veterans at the Veter-
ans Administration Hospital to learn
the meaning of the holiday.
The annual Veterans Day parade
in Boston went on as scheduled, de-
spite temperatures in the low 30s
and a glaze of ice on the streets, al-
though in western Massachusetts
parades at Pittsfield and North
Adams were canceled because of the
season's second widespread snow.
Boston Patrolman Jack Kervin
said veterans in the city's parade
weren't going to let the cold stop
them from marching. "Soldiers fight
in all types of weather," he said,
"It'll give those marchers flashbacks
of their miserable days in boot-
West Bank
lawyers
blast Israeli
policies
(Continued from Page 1)
the intelligence agency did in fact lie
in court in the past. Both speakers
said that no old decisions were being
reversed as a result of the finding.
Qubty also condemned the Israeli
government for destroying
Palestinian houses. "Sometimes
people are accused with military
offenses and before they are brought
to court, before they are charged,
their houses are demolished," he
said.
The two speakers focused their
discussion on the treatment of
Palestinians in the West Bank and
Gaza Strip, which are not considered
a part of Israel. The occupied
territories are currently under Israeli
militafy rule and subject to military
courts instead of regular Israeli
courts.
"The Israeli law doesn't apply to
the people in the occupied territory,"
said Qubty.
However, both lawyers stressed
that -discrimination occurs against
Arabs inside Israel as well. They said
subtleties in the law enabled the
government to differentiate between
Arabs and Jews.
According to Qubty, every Israeli,
whether Arab or Jewish, must enter
4the army at age 18. However, the
Israeli Defense Minister can prohibit
people from entering the army, and
Qubty said that currently no Arabs
are admitted.
Qubty said this allows Israeli
r lawmakers to differentiate between

camp."
In pittsburgh
sunshine in tim
to turn out to c
George Bush as
city's parade. "O
do anything bu
newed sense of.
newed sense of h

United States
missing soldiers
those who have defended our values
h, snow gave way to in peace.
e for several people "We honor both living and dead,
heer Vice President and those whose fate is still not re-
s he marched in that solved - our missing in action,
)nce a year, it dosen't countrymen whom we swear never
t good to have a re- to forget."
patriotism and a re- In Washington at the Vietnam
honor," Bush said. Veterans Memorial, special tribute

'We honor both living and dead, and those whose
fate is still not resolved - our missing in action.'
-Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger

A driving rainstorm put a chill on
observances at the Tomb of the Un-
known Soldier at Arlington Ceme-
tery outside Washington.
"On this day, our nation pauses
to honor all her veterans, past and
present," said Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger in prepared re-
marks. "We remember both those
who helped us prevail in war, and

was paid to 24 men whose names
have just been added to the more
than 58,000 war dead listed on the
memorial's granite walls.
Cold, blustery wind greeted parade
marchers across Georgia, but World
War II veteran Lou Atterberry Jr.
didn't seem to mind as he snapped
salutes at the passing ROTC and
military units in Savannah's parade.

Tice alksDoily Photo by KAREN HANDELMAN
Tice talks
Frank Tice stops to talk yesterday on State Street, where his son owns a convenience store. Tice has been in
the clothing business in Ann Arbor for over 35 years.

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angy at the darimes y of the human soul and
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Students of all majors are invited
to attend a presentation on
Opportunities in
Investment Banking
MORGAN STANLEY.
Public Finance
Monday, November 16, 1987
Michigan Union
Pond Room
7:00 to 9:00p. m.

i

I

UNIVERSAL PICTURES invites you to attend
A VERY SPECIAL FREE SCREENING
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15
'"P /4f" - -I /" '"4 " I I I A I I

I

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