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November 11, 1987 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-11-11

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tU,

Ninety-eight years of editorial freedom
Vol. XCVIII, No. 45 Ann Arbor, Michigan- Wednesday, November 11, 1987 Copyright 1987, The Michigan Daily

Search

looked
Bennett

at

Sec.

Press aide says 'U' reps.
mentioned presidency

Abandoned Doily Photo by SCOTT ITUCHY
A walk through Old Main Hospital-which was replaced by the new University Hospital nearly two years
ago-reveals dust, desolation, and 60 years of medical history slowly coming to an end. Old Main will be
demolished next year, and the planning for its destruction has begun. Take a look inside, Page 8.
'U' worker complains ofC
continued harassment

By DAVID WEBSTER
Education Secretary William
Bennett's spokesperson said he
believes some members of the
University's presidential search
committee have considered Bennett
as a candidate to replace President
Harold Shapiro.
Press secretary Loye Miller said
two people associated with the
search process solicited Bennett's
opinion on the qualities that a
university president should exhibit.
See related story, Page 3
Miller stressed that at no time during
the conversation last July was
Bennett asked if he would consider
taking the position of president of
the University.
But Miller said he got the
impression that the people Bennett
met with "had a desire for him to
assume (the presidential) position."
Miller declined to identify the
two, but said they were representing
at least one person or a group of
people involved in the presidential
search process. He said Bennett has
not been approached by anyone

affiliated with the presidential search
process since July.
"The conversation was along the
lines of advice for a presidential
search committee," Miller said.
"Nobody said 'We are interested in
you, Secretary Bennett, assuming
the position of president.' "
Regent Thomas Roach (D-
Saline), in accordance with Board of
Regents' policy, would neither
confirm nor deny that Bennett is
being considered as a candidate for
the presidency. But, he said, "I
would not be surprised if someone
has talked with him."
Roach also said the regents have
not directly asked anyone to consider
filling the office.
Regent James Waters (D-
Muskegon) said he was unaware of
the July meeting with Bennett.
Miller said Bennett - who has
not been to the University at any
time during his term as education
secretary - has not ruled out the
possibility of eventually accepting a
position as a university president.
"Sometime he's going to have to
do something different," Miller said.
Bennett also recently m'et with
two trustees from the University of
Tennessee to discuss that

Bennett
... will he replace Shapiro?
university's current search for a
president. Miller said Bennett's
discussion with the trustees from
Tennessee was along the same lines
as his discussion with the represen-
tatives from Michigan.
Bennett is not a popular figure
with many of the nation's students.
"He has not been an advocate of
students or financial aid," said Mary
Preston, legislative director of the
United States Students Association.
"I would really look at him very
carefully."

By STEPHEN GREGORY
University maintenance worker Mary Clark may file
a grievance against the University for an incident last
Monday in which someone wrote "Sucks Whit Dicks"
(sic) on a picture of her and placed it in a classroom
where she would be late Monday night.
Clark, who was working in the C.C. Little building
at the time, believes her Building Maintenance co-work-
ers are responsible. She dismissed the possibility that
the perpetrator or perpetrators may have been students.
"If it was a student, they should know how to spell
'white. '
"They (her co-workers) knew I had to be there," she
said.r
Two weeks ago Clark's superiors moved her from
East Engineering to C.C. Little, a building maintained
by a predominantly white cleaning staff. "They don't

want me there any more than I want to be there. I want
my old area back," Clark said.
She said that at 4:40 p.m. Monday she entered a first-
floor classroom to get cleaning supplies from a custodial
closet when she discovered a copy of last Friday's Daily
which featured her picture on the front page.
"Sucks Whit Dicks" was written above the picture
and an arrow was drawn from the words to Clark. "This
is directed right at me," she said.
Assistant Director of Public Safety Robert Pifer con-
firmed Clark's story and said his office was conducting
an investigation. But he doubted anything will come of
it.
Last week, Clark filed civil rights and unfair labor
practice charges against the University with city attor-
neys for last month's incident, in which she found the
See CLARK, Page 5

Reagan expected to nominate

'Moderates'

want

Kennedy to1 Hig
WASHINGTON (AP) - Judge Anthony Kennedy's
selection to the Supreme Court could come as early as
today, the White House said yesterday, as officials re-
viewed FBI checks into Kennedy's background to guard
against surprises.
With Kennedy's selection apparently imminent,
President Reagan's chief advisers met at the White
House along with a team of FBI investigators "to re-
view the status of the FBI's work" in checking
Kennedy's background, said presidential spokesman
Marlin Fitzwater. Fitzwater said there was "a possibil-
ity we'll have an announcement tomorrow.".
"It just boils down to whether he's (Reagan) ready,"
Fitzwater said. "If we're ready, we'll do it."
Originally, Reagan had no activities on his schedule
because it is Veteran's Day, a federal holiday, and the

h Court soon
White House staff was to have the day off. Fitzwater
said the press office would be open for business.
Fitzwater said a preliminary investigation could be
completed today but that a full field 'check of
Kennedy's background, including interviews with asso-
ciates and colleagues, will not be finished for some
time.
Attorney General Edwin Meese, White House chief
of staff Howard Baker, counsel A.B. Culvahouse and
FBI Director William Sessions met at the White House
along with a team of FBI investigators. And adminis-
tration officials arranged courtesy calls with leading
senators for Kennedy amid Republican bickering over
the defeat of Robert Bork and the withdrawal of Dou-
glas Ginsburg.

MSA to focus locally

By ANDREW MILLS
Billing themselves as the
"moderate party," LSA seniors David
Sternlicht and John Villanueva hope
to focus the Michigan Student
Assembly on campus issues, like
financial aid and housing. Sternlicht
and Villanueva are vying for two
Elections 871
LSA seats on the assembly under the
United Students of Michigan banner.
The pair ran an unsuccessful
campaign for assembly president and
vice-president last March under the
FLASH name.
Villanueva was later appointed to
the assembly as an LSA
representative. The pair said this
year's party has the experience that
FLASH lacked.
"John has experience (on the
assembly)," Sternlicht said, "and he
sees that some of the ideas we had
could be implemented."
Villanueva is vice-chair of the
campus governance committee. He
also sits on the Budget Priorities and

External Relations committees, as
well as being on the University's
undergraduate admissions advisory
council.
Sternlicht recently finished a stint
as chair of the University Activities
Center Homecoming committee, and
was on the assembly's Student
Rights and External Relations
committees. Students can sit on
MSA committees without being
elected representatives.
Sternlicht and Villanueva said
they are "filling a gap" created when
"moderate" LSA representatives
David Newblatt, Michael Margolis,
and Ashish Prasad leave the assembly
later this month.
"We have open minds," Sternlicht
said, adding that they will strive to
listen to all sides of an issue.
Villanueva said the assembly
needs representatives who will take a
middle ground politically on issues,
since the student body is not
overwhelmingly liberal or
conservative.
Villanueva said the party's four-
tiered platform would focus the
assembly's agenda. They listed
See CANDIDATES, Page 3

Prof. accused of assault sues

Villanueva
... dedicated to financial aid

By STEVE BLONDER
A University professor is filing a
slander suit against both an LSA
senior who claims he sexually
assaulted her and a counselor at the
Sexual Assault Prevention and
Awareness Center, according to
documents recently filed in Washte-
naw County Circuit Court.
A judge issued a temporary
restraining order forbidding the
women from contacting the
professor's employers or associates
and from saying the plaintiff is a
"sexual criminal, sexual deviant, or
sexually offensive person."
A hearing is scheduled for Friday
morning before Judge Edward Deake
to review the restraining order. The
defendants have not objected to the
order.

Records show the defendants made
two telephone calls to Alan Kyes,
chair of the University's Germanic
Languages Department. in which
Thomas Rosenboom is "writer-in-
residence."
The student allegedly told Kyes
that Rosenboom had attacked her,
she "had all the facts and (she was)
sure of them," and that Rosenboom
"will go to prison for two years."
This call was allegedly followed
up by one from the counselor, Kata
Issari, during which she repeated the
information about Rosenboom.
Both defendants refused to
comment, and their attorneys were
unavailable to discuss the case.
In the suit, Rosenboom is
seeking more than $10,000 to

compensate for the emotional
distress he says he has suffered and
for any damage done to his personal
and professional reputation.
Leslie Seeligson, Rosenboom's
attorney, said "the women made
allegations against someone
presumed to be innocent. They
carried these out in a very negligent
matter in an attempt to hurt
(Rosenboom) personally."
Seeligson said the case was not
filed as an intimidation tactic against
the student. "It's highly probable
that if the women hadn't contacted
(Kyes), the suit would not have been
filed," he said. "There's no
correlation between the civil and
criminal cases."
The criminal case will go to trial
on Dec. 21.
INSIDE
Fat Al is steamed over the paving
of the Diag.
OPINION, Page 4
Berthold Brecht's Embracing the
Butcher is a learning play.
ARTS, Page 7

Sternlicht
... knows what students want

L

Administrator tries to avoid
political side of city affairs

By STEVE KNOPPER
Godfrey Collins has a big
responsibility - he manages the
City of Ann Arbor. And when he
retires in January of 1989, he has
hi nianc

much the case."
After he retires, Barbara Collins,
his wife of 36 years, said, "We'll
have more time together. I'm
naturally going to be glad when such

department, you have your fire
department, you have a water
department," Collins said. "It's like
a conglomerate that you're heading
up, and it's very challenging and
interesting to try to coordinate all

.,. . .,.. w ti. ..,::a k Vi e.

I

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