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September 11, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 11, 1987- Page 5

Commission
approves
Hillel
expansion
By STEVE KNOPPER
The B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tion's proposal to destroy its 50-
year-old building and erect a new one
on its 1429 Hill St. site was unani-
mously approved at last night's Ann
Arbor Planning Commission meet-
ing.
Hillel's proposal will go before
the Zoning Board of Appeals next
week, and finally to the Ann Arbor
City Council in two weeks. If ap-
proved, construction on the new
building will be scheduled for a
September 1988 completion.
The new two-story, 27,589-square
"foot community center will be "quite
spectacular," said Hillel Director
Michael Brooks, adding that the
University's largest Jewish student
group has planned the expansion for
two years.
The proposal was tabled at last
month's planning commission
meeting so modifications could be
made. The approved plan enlarged
'.the front entry, removed a parking
space, added a fire hydrant, and
widened the opening to Hill St.
Brooks also promised commis-
sion members that he would conceal
the parking lots from public view.
The new building will also be more
accessible to wheelchairs, Brooks
said.
Hillel will continue to operate
from the rented second floor offices
at 339 S. Liberty St. during the
construction.
Hillel, the world's oldest and
largest Jewish service organizations,
provides religious services, kosher
food programs, and information on
Jewish community issues. It also
offers 15 non-credit Judaica classes
each semester at the University.

Lecture halls ready for class

By CARRIE LORANGER
Construction on auditoriums A
and B in Angell Hall was completed
in time for the first day of classes,
giving students a "better atmo-
sphere" for learning.
Renovations on the auditoriums
began the first week in June, said
George Beal, owner of J.C. Beal
Construction in Ann Arbor. Beal
said construction crews have been
working ten-hour days, six days a
week for the last four weeks to as-
sure completion of the auditorium
by the first day of classes.
"We were told that right now this
is the most important project at the
University," said Beal.
"The renovation is part of the
University's classroom renovation
plan to provide state-of-the-art
teaching facilities," said Henry Hal-
loway, administrative manager of
LSA.
One goal of the $350,000
renovation was to improve the sound
quality in the auditoriums, which are
frequently used for viewing films.
"We have quite a nice audio-
acoustical speaker system buried in
the walls," said Tom Schlaff, con-
struction engineering manager.
English Prof. Peter Bauland, who
has taught in auditorium A, said the
sound and ventilation systems needed
improvement, and the old screen was
losing its luminescence.
"From what I understand they are
trying to duplicate actual theater
conditions," said Bauland, adding
that speakers on stage are not as ef-
fective as those built into the walls.

Schlaff said the walls were resur-
faced with tile and a soft board to
improve sound quality in the rooms.
Other improvements include new
ceilings, lights, air conditioning,
projection screens, blackboards, car-
pet and seats in auditorium B.
"We will temporarily use (the
projection equipment) that has been
used in the past but hopefully in the
very near future (we will) purchase
new equipment," said Halloway.
The J.C. Beal Construction com-
pany is also responsible for building

new serving areas in Stockwell Hall
and South Quad over the summer.
Additional construction has begun
on a new computer center in the
courtyard between Angell and Mason
Halls. Officials estimate the center
will house 200 to 300 new comput-
ers.
Construction on auditoriums C
and D will begin next year. Workers
will upgrade lighting, sound, and
fixtures in the two rooms. Officials
will determine later whether projec-
tion booths will be added.

-PWI THE
- FRide
Ann Arbor Transportation Authority
It's Required Riding!
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AATA take you wherever you're going
throughout the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area.
Whether its shopping, a movie or restaurant,
or a part-time job, AATA service is convenient
and dependable.
For route and schedule information,
call 996-0400.

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY
Workers place the finishing touches on Auditorium B in Angell Hall.
Auds. C and D are next up for renovation.

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