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November 09, 1987 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


State may
outlaw
prank
calls
By KATHLEEN KASPER
Crank telephone callers who hang
up without saying anything may
Lace up to six months in jai and a
$500 fine if a bill, sponsored by the
House Judiciary Committee, is
passed by the House and Senate.
The statute does not make hang-
ing up upon dialing a wrong number
an offense.
State Representative Debbie
Farhat (D-Muskegon), who agreed to
sponsor the bill, said the General
Telephone Company of Michigan
and the state police think they can
better serve victims of nuisance calls
if the current law is amended in this
way.
"This type of nuisance call can be
just as unnerving and frightening to
the victim as other forms of tele-
phone harassment," said Roy
Boudreau, GTE's state governmental
affairs executive.
To find the caller, Bret McCray of
Representative Perry Bullard's (D-
Ann Arbor) office said a device will
be put on the victim's phone to
track the source of the phone call.
This device does not identify the
caller, only the phone which was
used for the call.
McCray said callers who mali-
ciously call and hang up after the
party answers are disturbing the
{peace.
He did not think the bill would
be very effective, but maintained that
it was no more absurd than some
other legislation. He said several
committee members thought the bill
was silly.
Sergeant Kevin McNulty, of the
University's Department of Public
Safety and Security, said there are
many complaints of nuisance calls
on campus, but many are harassment
calls in which the caller speaks.
Calls don't usually need to be traced,
but it can be done, said McNulty.

The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 9, 1987- Page 3
One candidate files
for LSA-SG presidency

By MICHAEL LUSTIG
Only one person has declared
candidacy for the presidency of LSA's
student government.
LSA juniors Barb Eisenberger and
Trisha Drueke, both members of the
currnt 15-member executive council,
are running under the banner of the
Students for Academic and Institu-
tional Development (SAID) party.
They are unopposed in their quest for
the presidency and vice-presidency.
Eisenberger was disappointed at
the lack of competition in the race. "I
just hate the apathy on this campus,"
she said.
Eleven other students are running
with SAID for seats on the 15-seat
Executive Council. Seven people are
have declared themselves as indepen-
dent candidates for the board.
The LSA-SG has two major roles
on campus. One is to give money to
student groups. LSA-SG has about
$16,000, which it gets from student
government fees that all LSA stu-
dents pay as part of tuition, to dis-
tribute to student groups. Its other
job is to appoint students to Univer-
sity committees such as LSA's Cur-
riculumCommittee.
LSA-SG has also taken on some
issues of its own. At a candidates'
meeting Friday, LSA-SG Vice-presi-
tuitiont
"The increased tuition will free $8
to $10 million to be used for
financial aid for in-state students,"
Tougas said.
Since the law went into effect in
Massachusetts, foreign students are
no longer subsidized by the state.
Out-of-state students are still
partially funded by the
Massachusetts government.

dent Michael Nelson explained the
council's "action groups" designed to
improve undergraduate life. This
term, Nelson said, the groups have
looked into pre-registration as a way
to make CRISP easier; obtaining
LSA course credits for ROTC stu-
dents; and publicizing counseling.
"Those of you elected next term
will have the awesome task of con-
continuing our work," Nelson said.
Achieving name recognition has
been a challenge for LSA-SG.Last
year, only about 900 students out of
an eligible 17,000 voted in its elec-
tion. This year, the group has bud-

geted $750 for election advertisings
consisting of posters, Diag boards,
and advertisements in publications
around campus.
Voting for the LSA-SG will be
held along with elections for repre-
sentatives to the Michigan Student
Assembly Nov. 18 and 19. Current
President John Pantowich said that
the ballots for the two slates will be
stapled together and then separated by
election workers. Having the two
elections on the same days will
"definitely increase voter turnout,"
Pantowich said.

f

TUESDAY LUNCH FORUM

N

at the
INTERNATIONAL CENTER - 603 E. MADISON
November 10 at 12noon: "Nicaragua: A Slice Show about
Driving a Garbage Truck from Ann Arbor to Juigalpa, Nicaragua"
Speaker: Tom Rieke, Free-Lance Writer for
Quorum Communications, Inc.
for additional information - please call 662-5529

I

Sponsored by:
The Ecumenical Campus Center
and the International Center

Lunch Available:
$1.00 (students)
$1.50 (others)

Daily Photo by GRACE TsA
Donation
Ann Arbor.resident Amy Foucher stops to donate money to Brent Travis,
an Ozone house representative, in front of the Michigan Union. Travis is a
children's therapist for Ozone house, which offers temporary housing and
counseling for runaway youth on N. Main.

-[Cornerstone

CHRISTIAN

FELLOWSHIP

Mass. IdA
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
A new Massachusetts law has
raised the tuition for foreign students
attending state-funded colleges and
universities, but M i c h i g a n
legislators are not considering
similar legislation.
The Massachusetts law provides
for a "three-tier system" that sets
different tuition rates for in-state,
out-of-state, ,and foreign students.
Michigan lawmakers consider out-of-
state students and foreign students in
the same category, and they leave
tuition decisions to the governing
boards of each institution.
This year, 2,446 of the 49,523
students at the University are from
abroad.

TEIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Ws forefvign
Michigan State Rep. Burton
Leland (D-Detroit), chair of the
House Colleges and Universities
Committee, doesn't believe the state
legislature should dictate tuition
rates at state colleges and univer-
sities. He believes the responsibility
lies with the governing body of each
institution.
The University's Board o f
Regents is not currently considering
enacting a tuition hike for foreign
students.
"Historically, institutions o f
higher education have privileges
which allow them to run their own
shop," said Leland. "If we start
telling the universities what to do,
pretty soon we'll be in the
classrooms telling them what books
to use. We don't want to get
involved in that, and I don't think
we have the right to get involved
with that."
State Sen. Joe Conroy (D-Flint),
a staunch proponent of increased in-
state student enrollment, doesn't
view foreign students any differently
than out-of-state students. "I think
Michigan students should have the
first opportunity to enroll at the
(state) universities," he said.
Conroy added that there is no need
to differentiate between the tuitions
of out-of-state and foreign students.
Massachusetts State Rep. Roger
Tougas(D-Dartmouth), who initiated
the law in that state, believes
otherwise. "We had an abundance of
foreign students who were taking the
places of Massachusetts residents,"
he said. "If these foreign students,
who must return to their countries
after graduation, want to use the
universities of the Commonwealth
of Massachusetts, then they should
have to pay their full tuition."

Students Dedicated to
Knowing and
Communicating
Jesus Christ!

The Michigan Daily
CLASSIFIED MAIL-IN FORM

Campus Cinema
Personal Services
(Terry Jones, 1987) Mich.,.
7:15 p.m.
Julie Walters (Educating
Rita) is a waitress who sets up
a bordello aimed at serving
upper class members of Brit-
ish society. Satirical look at
prostitution and the class
system, directed by Monty
Python's Terry Jones.
Play it again, S a m
(Herbert Ross, 1972) Mich.,
9:25 p.m.
Woody Allen, not a big hit
with the women he meets,
takes advice from the ghost of
Humphery Bogart. With Diane
Keaton.
Speakers
Philippe Hamon - "Texte.
Litteraire et Architecture," 4:10
p.m., Fourth floor Commons,
MLB.
Mary Roehm - slide lecture
on her work and on the program at
Pewabic Pottery, 8 p.m., 2104 Art
,and Architecture Auditorium.
Ian Gillman - "Surface
Similarities and Deep Differences,"
Visiting Professor of Religious
Thought Program, 8 p.m., MLB
Aud. 3.
Thomas Reichel -
"Bioinorganic Models for the In-
hibition of the Sodim Pump by
Vanadium," 4p.m., 1200 Chem-
istry Bldg.
Stephen Dunning a n d
Laura Roop - poetry and prose
readings, . Guild House Writers
Series, 8 p.m. Guild House, 802
Monroe.

William Diehl -
"Overcoming the Obstacles to
World Peace: Universal Education,"
Baha'i Club, 7:30 p.m., Michigan
Union, Anderson A and B.
Meetings
Circle K - mass meeting, 7
p.m., Michigan Union, Pond
Room.
Asian-American Associa-
tion -meeting, 7 p.m., Trotter
House, 1443 Washtenaw.
Furthermore
Owens Fiberglass - pre-
interview sponsored by Society of
Women Engineers, 4 p.m., 1013
Dow Bldg.
Semester at Sea - film
showing, 3 p.m., International
Center, West Quad.
Talmud study group -
"Laws of Lost & Found," 4:30
p.m., Chabad House.
Tanya - Chassidic Jewish
Mysticism study group, 8 p.m.,
Chabad House.
Send sn wuneements of up-
coming events to "The List," c/o
The Michigan D'aily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.,
48108. Include all pertinent in-
formation and a contact phone
number. We must receive an-
nouncements for Frl4ay and
Sunday events at least two weeks
beforenthe event, and announ-
cements for weekday events
must be received at least two
days bef ore the event.

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Pastor Mike Caulk
Diag Evangelist
Tuesdays
7 p.m.
2231 Angell Hall
971-9150

1. Form must be filled out completely.
2. Mail money and form to: The Michigan Daily Classifieds, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
3. Payment (check or money order) must be, enclosed with the ad. Please do not send cash.
4. Deadline: One business day prior to publication by 11:30 a.m.
For more information, call 764-0557
AD TET (Please Dew sPcus aterpunctudton and ends t sentences. Use eCnt punctua3w hnd end with a pe le.t
CATEGORY moam ock(ne) RUN DATES AND COST
10. Lost & Found 100. Help Wanted START DATE: NUMBER OF INSERTIONS:
20. For Sale 110. Business Services
30. Automotive 120. Going Piaces
40. For Rent 130. Miscellaneous DAYS 1 2 3 4 5
50. Dorm Doings .140. Musical 2 3.66 4.98 6.22 7.44 8.66
60.GreekGab 150.GoingPlaces 3 5.49 7.47 9.33 11.16 12.99
70. Personal 160. Tickets W
80. Cupid's Helper 170. Roommates 4 7.32 9.96 12.44 14.88 17.32
90.StudentServices 180.CarrputerMdse. =1 5 9.15 12.45 15.55 18.60 21.65
ADVERTISER
I understand that this advertising request will be processed in accordance with The Michigan Daily's standard Classified advertising policies
available on request
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY. STATE. ZIP
PHONE

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CONSULTANTS TO INTERNATIONAL FIRMS
WE HAVE CLIENTS SEEKING QUALIFIED INDIVIDUALS WITH
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DEGREES FROM AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES ACCEPTED
AS VISA RESTRICTIONS WILL NOT AFFECT CERTAIN
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CORRECTIONS

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