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November 06, 1987 - Image 20

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-11-06
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w

SIMIEN
Continued from Page 4
been before."
Simien has been writing songs
with Art Neville and Dickie
Landry, an avant garde saxophone
player who has recorded with Philip
Glass and Laurie Anderson. He has
set aside January and February as
months for taking time off the road
and concentrating on writing.
"I plan on doing a lot of stuff in
English with lyrics that really
make sense. I want to take the
music and give it lyrics that people
can really understand. I'll do a few
songs in French, keep it a folk
music, but a lot of the old lyrics,
to be honest, don't make such
sense," Simien said.
"It's good moving music but the
lyrics are so weak that sometimes

it's hard to relate to. I'm writing
new songs and also giving new
lyrics to old songs. My lyrics are
influenced byinfluenced by guys
like Bob Dylan and Paul Simon. I
want to combine different musical
traditions- learn from what they
did and combine it with our
traditional music and make it
something totally different."
"We're going to get together and
come out with an album that will
shock the world and I believe it can
be done. I see the reaction to the
music and I think the only thing
it's lacking is strong lyrics. You've
got to aim high. We've already
gotten further than I ever thought
was possible and I don't want to
stop here."
John Hammond never recorded an
album that shocked the world. He's
never even tried to. He hasn't
strived to create new forms of

;

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V V w w q

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music. Rather, he's helped to keep
a very old tradition alive, one that
is central to the development of
Black music.
Hammond got turned onto acous -
tic blues in 1958 when he first
heard a recording of legendary Delta
bluesman Robert Johnson. "I was a
blues fan before that," Hammond
said, "but when I heard his stuff I
actually felt inspired to go out and
play. And I did."
9 During his 25 year career
Hammond has played with many of
the finest blues and blues
influenced musicians in the land,
including Duane Allman, Michael
Bloomfield, John Lee Hooker, Dr.
John, Robbie Robertson, and Steve
Winwood. Yet, Hammond has
chosen to remain solo and true to a
pure form of the blues for most of
the years.
"There's a certain intensity and
powerful impact which a solo artist
stately simplicity of the Dylan
original as well as the propulsive
strumming of the Hendrix version,
and his funny, stripped-down run at
Sheila E's "A Love Bizarre" gives
the Prince lyric an eerie profundity
I'd never noticed.
Hedges winds up the LP with a
sing-along romp through the
Beatles' "Come Together." Hedges'
instrumentals range from pretty,
ambient sound-pictures ("Breakfast
in the Field," "Rikki's Shuffle") to
manic, open-ended variations on a
jazzy theme, kind of like acoustic-
period Pat Metheny on an acid trip
("Silent Anticipations," "The

can put across which I just don't
think a band can create," Hammond
explained earlier this year. "In a
band the focus is diffused, even if
just a little bit. A solo artist, when
everything is right can be much
more effective (than a band)."
"It's harder on a solo artist
because there's a lot more
pressure," Hammond continued.
"You can't hide anything when
you're up there alone. It's much
more intense. It's really a unique
thing. You just see this one guy
and all his emotions come out."
"The blues are an American mus -
ical form. It's a unique music
which can capture the power and
passion of living."
Lots of emotions will flow this
weekend at the Pig. Showtime
tonight for Simien is 10:30 pn.
Hammond will play two shows
Sunday, art 7:30 and 9:30 p. m. M

COVER STORY
Continued from Page 9
RC senior Edwin Munich said he
discovered the RC by accident,
applying to the Residential College
because he thought he was applying
to live on campus. But once he
started to receive brochures about the
RC, he was attracted by the sense of
community, the small classes, the
discussions, and the written
evaluations.
"I felt there was more room for
me as a person to come out. I didn't
want to be in a small college. I
wanted to have the facilities of a big
University," he said.
"I feel a community between
faculty and students and there's not
this barrier. I've had experiences
sitting in the Halfass (Halfway Inn)
talking to a professor about how the
class went that day. That's just
incredible. You can be sitting there
with the teacher talking about the
class."
When the RC began in the '60s,
students opposed the idea of across-
the-board requirements. Soon after
its inception, a core curriculum that
dictated what classes the RC students
should take was abolished. Today,
RC students have to take a first-year
seminar, complete an arts practicum
with hand-on experience in the
creative arts, and reach proficiency in
a language.
Proficiency includes a

comprehensive exam in speaking,
writing, reading, and aural
comprehension. Students have to
take a reading course in the language
after they complete proficiency.
Students can take language
classes in LSA, but the RC offers
intensive language courses in
French, Spanish, German, and
Russian. The classes meet eight
hours a week - half of the student's
course load. The structure encourages
high-level development of speaking
skills in and out of the classroom.
There are foreign language lunch
tables and coffee hours which give
students further practice in
conversation.
In addition, many RC activities
take place outside the classroom.
The East Quad auditorium is used by
a chamber orchestra, the RC
Singers, and the RC Players - a
theatre group that performs
professional and student-written
plays. The RC uses the Halfway
Inn, asnack bar located in the
basement of East Quad, as a meeting
place for students and faculty or for
programs sponsored by the college.
Most RC students take about half of
their course in LSA, but RC junior
Anne Marie Hubbell is one of the
few students who has never taken a
class outside of the college. "It was
not a conscious decision," she said.
"When I looked for classes they fit
into my schedule and they all were
something I wanted to take."
Hubbell is working on an

independent concentration program
in drama and creative writing. She
feels her classes "all have a unique
approach to what they're talking
about."
"It's a personalized method of
teaching. I don't feel like I'm
interchangeable with anyone else."
She said the RC is marked by the
interest of the students. "There's a
lot of people who are socially aware.
They (RC students) tend to be
people who are extremely active in
all kinds of things."
The RC offers interdisciplinary
majors that cannot be found
anywhere else at.the University. The
social science concentration, one of
the RC's more popular, combines
the study of many fields such as
psychology, political science,
anthropology, or economics.
The program has a research
requirement that gets students to
integrate theory and practice.
Students can fulfill their research
requirement by engaging in a field
study which carries 12 hours of
credit for students. Students and
faculty work together on a project in
small groups and write up the result
collectively.
This work breaks down ┬░he
mystique of rc r ad
distinction betM - -ifaculty and
students, said RC social scicnce
lecturer Charlie Bright. Past projects
have examined local topics such as
West Virginian migration to the
See COVER STORY, Page 13

PER5ION IN THlE H-A
'1N { ' f oo 6tRLL 1 'MUPR
" of A CbE-K
p tiN A. o~l~fIr
- I WPALTO, Ti
" I"sib" AI T
r -NN S
' WMT

my w

John Hammond sings the blues
sunday night at the Blind Pig.

Women In Judaism Series Presents
MARCIA FALK
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16
Kuenzel Room, Michigan Union
THE SPIRITUAL JOURNEY OF A JEWISH FEMINIST
Marcia Falk, a poet and professor of literature at the Univerity of Judaism In Los Angeles, will speak about the
creation of new liturgies and will present her new Hebrew and Englis blessings that transcend the gender of divinity
and will describe the process she uses to create new liturgy. For more info call Hfflel 663.3336
ll

RECORDS
Continued from Page 4
Knopfler-like, spacious timing and
the Edge's type of simultaneous
rhythm/lead playing, punctuated by
his own quick scratching and
harmonics, gives him a palette of
sonic colors full enough to assay
the surprising variety of numbers
on his new Live on the Double
Planet LP singlehandedly.
He shows a real hand with
covers; "All Along the
Watchtower" pays homage to the

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Funky Avocado"). On the other
hand, Hedges' own vocal pieces
feature gorgeous, folky tunes and
richly poetic lyrics, hansomely
sung.
Hedges introduces "The Funky
Avocado" whimsically: "This sort
of starts off with a medium R&B
tempo, eases out into hard rock, and
ends in a fit of disco fury." It's
entertaining evidence that this
album is as essential a catalogue of
a master player, as of a showman
having fun with new possibilities.
-Michael Fischer.
Diamond
Diamond
MiJems Records
At first it seems like Diamond is
just another copy-cat band trying to
cash in on the Bon Jovi-Cinderella-
Poison pop metal success of late.
However, this album could kindof
be defined as heavy metal, but the
band never really turns it up and
rocks out.
Diamond features mostly hard
rock ballads, with an instrumental
piece being the hardest rocking
tune. The thing that makes all these
ballads palatable and even enjoyable
is the talent of the vocalist, who
displays a wonderful voice
(somewhat of a rarity in hard rock).
-Chuck Skarsaune
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PAGE 6 WEEKEND/NOVEMBER 6, 1987

WEEKEND/NOVEMBER 6, 1987

PAGE 6

WEEKEND/NOVEMBER 6, 1987

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