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November 05, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.The Michigan Daily-Thursday, November 5, 1987- Page 5

Goodman
addresses
women's
progress
(Contnuedfrom Page 1)
possible," said Goodman, who
writes a column called "At Large"
for the Boston Globe.
Goodman said that although
women have made achievements in
the work world, they still earn only
70 cents per dollar earned by their
male counterparts.
She said women have had more
success in adapting to male values
- achieving power, success, being
competitive - than men have had in
adapting female values. However,
she said women must deal with a
"double burden" because they still
are expected to provide family
nurturing and do most of the
housework.

Peace Corps offers new
internship program

By HEATHER EURICH
Riding in a horse drawn carriage
to her job as an English teacher was
one of University Peace Corps Co-
ordinator Louise Baldwin's most
memorable experiences.
Baldwin, who volunteered in
Afghanistan from 1973 to 1977, re-
members her work fondly. "I made
some very good friends there," she
said.
This year, Baldwin is coordinat-
ing a new program designed to give
undergraduates the same kind of fond
Peace Corps memories.
The University Peace Corps of-
fice will nominate two students to
work as interns in capital city Peace
Corps offices around the world. They
are looking for people who can
speak Spanish or French and are fa-
miliar enough with word processing
to perform management tasks, work
with computers, and do research for
regular Peace Corps volunteers.

This is the Peace Corps intern-.
ship program's first year.
Unlike the regular field assign-
ments which usually last two to four
years, internships only last 10 to15
weeks. The interns are also respon-
sible for paying all expenses -
about $2000 - except their lodging
and training.
Baldwin said the main purpose of
the program is to educate the interns.
She said the program is similar to
the Public Service Internship Pro-
gram in Washington D.C. which is
run by the Career Planning and
Placement office.
Dartmouth College in New
Hampshire developed the pilot
progam for internships when it sent
eight students abroad last year. Since
then, 120 college presidents have
agreed to participate in Campus
Compact, the organization sponsor-
ing the program.
The goal is to provide public ser-

vice opportunities to students who
will return to college and relate their
experiences to other students. In this
way, students can learn about other
cultures.
Baldwin will screen the applica-
tions, which are due Friday, and then
she and Jane Dickson from the
International Center will interview
students. They will send in the
names of their two nominees, who
will compete with almost 240 nom-
inees nationwide for about 20 posi-
tions.
Baldwin expects most of the ap-
plicants to be LSA students. The
short time committment - one
semester - attracts many, she said.
Financial assistance is available for
those who need it to participate.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Pulitzer Prize winning columnist Ellen Goodman, who writes for the
Boston Globe, discusses women's and men's changing roles in society at a
lecture last night at Rackham Auditorium. Goodman's column, called
"At Large", is syndicated to 325 newspapers.

John Irving reads
. from latest novel

(Continued from Page 1)
"Does the person who makes the
cardboard box know what it's used
for?"
Irving drew loud laughter from
the crowd when his usually soft-
spoken voice took on a new tenor as
he read dialogue in the broken
falsetto of Owen.
Irving's characteristic irony came
across particularly sharply in one
scene. Owen delivers the body of a
dead soldier to the deceased's family.
Describing the younger brother's
apparel, Irving wrote, "What I
thought were carpenter's pants
stained with oiled were actually jun-
gle fatigues like the recruits re-

In 1985, a controversia novel portrayed the
wild, excessive lives of the kids
i n Beverly Hills.

ceive... and he wore a cartridge belt
with loaded shells."
Irving's trademark style also
came across in sexual references
from Owen's comment, "I like your
sheath," to Owen's lonely girlfriend
who thinks that the Fourth of July
fireworks "look like sperm." Irving's
freak occurrences were there, too -
Owen killed his best friend's mother
with a line-drive foul ball at a Little
League baseball game.
Irving disappointed some of the
crowd by leaving the ending unre-
solved, but from the rest of the reac-
tion last night, Irving's novel could
be his biggest success yet.

On Friday, November 6th, brace yourself
for the motion picture.
ANDREW McCARTHY
JAMI GERIE
ROBERT DOWNER JR.

Bill to deputize campus
cops faces end in House

(Continued from Page 1)
"not committed either way on the
bill." He said his committee will
discuss the bill and make a decision
either to kill it or pass it on to the
entire House sometime in the next
month.
"We're going to have some dia-
logue and find out what people think
about (the bill)," Leland said.
Other members of the College
and Universities Committee could

not be reached for a comment.
MSA President Ken Weine and
member. of the Student Rights
Committee are scheduled to meet
with Leland today to discuss the bill.
Senate bill 339 would grant the
University's Board of Regents the
power to decide if public safety offi-
cers can carry guns on campus and
make arrests. Current laws only al-
low city police officers this power.

I
I

I
I

The University of Michigan
STUDENT STRUGGLE FOR SOVIET JEWRY
presents a symposium on
SOVIET JEWRY .
SUNDAY, NOV. 8
7:30 PM RACKHAM AMPH.

A

Speakers will include:
MARK LEVIN
Director of the Nat'l Conference for Soviet Jewry
JEAN SIMON
member Ot the Congressional Wives for Soviet Jewry
ALLA KAHN
Ann Arbor Action for Soviet Jewry
TANYA ZUNSHAIN
recently released refusnik
uma

i

r

WEll Burnha

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X23 .
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Drastic Rent
Reductions
like never before
on our last few
Campus
Apartments
No added fees,
Low Security
Deposits

m Associates
Immediate
Occupancy
Arbor Forest
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