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November 05, 1987 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-11-05

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, November 5, 1987

Networks help profs., students IN BRIEF
Aru d A nintad Pvcrn

nrt

(Continued from Page 1)
hours a week at the computer,
formingscouncils and setting up
meetings.
"It was a mega-success. The
class entirely got into it. The
people controlling it were swamped
with far greater response than they
anticipated," McGlinn said.
LSA SENIOR Julie Langer
said she has had two classes which
have used computer conferencing -
one for discussion of readings and
one for role playing.
In her Political Science 411
class, American Political Process,
students played the roles of
senators, congressmembers, and
members of special interest groups.
"You can't learn from a book
what you can learn from a
computer. You're not just sitting
there reading something. You're
doing it," she said. She too ended
up spending a couple hours a week
on line with the computer.
HOWEVER, IN her other
classthe computer use is not as
stimulating, she said, because there
is notas much interaction. Students
feel hesitant to sign onto the
system because they feel like they
are being quizzed on readings.
Bob Parnes, Confer's architect,
said the University is ahead of other

schools in terms of its fast
development and strong
commitment to making computers
accessible.
"What we're doing here at
Michigan is more, that I'm aware
of, and in a greater way than
anywhere else," Parnes said.

accessed by computers directly
linked to the system or by personal
computers which have a modem
attachment. Because more students
are using computers for conferenc-
ing, computing centers on campus
may ;soon be full of anxious
students waiting to get on line.

'You can't learn from a book what you can learn
from a computer.
-LSA senior Julie Langer

SOME STUDENTS may feel
intimidated by a class which
requires that they sign onto a
terminal and answer questions from
a professor. But generally, Parres
said, this feeling tends to fade
several weeks into the course.
"Fortunately it's a one-time
problem with students," he said.
Efforts are being made, through
residence hall conferences for
example, to familiarize students
with computers earlier so they
won't be overwhelmed when
approached by conferencing in a
class, he said.
The MTS system can be

Parnes, who initializes every
computer conference, said this may
result in a number of headaches.
"Taking off could be a problem.
But that's the kind of problem you
like to have," Parnes said.
MANY PROFESSORS are
being introduced to conferencing for
the first time. Natural Resources
Prof. Bunyan Bryant began using
computer conferencing for classes
this year.
He is using conferencing for one
week in Natural Resourcesr301,
Ecological Issues, to let students
contact a farm crisis expert in Des
Moines, Iowa. He used tele-
conferencing for the same class last
year, but is trying computer
conferencing this year on a
colleague's suggestion.
In Bryant's small group
organization and advocacy planning
class, he uses conferencing to

"encourage people to not only share
conceptual knowledge but also their
feelings."
Bryant says he eventually hopes
to develop a concept of a "global
brain," using conferencing for
experts worldwide to discuss
international park and forestry
problems.
SINCE CONFERENCING
is becoming more popular,
departments such as English,
political science, and psychology
have organized support for
professors wishing to start using it.
This term, lecture-demonstration
sessions were offered by the
computing center for the first time
to teach students, faculty, and staff
how to use Confer. Four lectures
were given, attracting a total of
over 500 people.
For winter term, the computer
center will offer conferencing
workshops again and a new
organizers workshop to teach
faculty and staff how to set up a
conference.
Jimi Lee Haswell, who works
within the documentation and
education staffs of the computing
center, helped establish much of the
conferencing programs within
departments.
"It extends the classroom. It's
hard to get a discussion going in
one hour and this way you can
extend the discussion," Haswell said
of computer conferencing. "The
sky's almost the limit. It depends
on the creativity of the professor."

uompuea jrUM SSUtatea ress repurts
Dow industrial average drops
NEW YORK - Stock prices sagged worldwide yesterday in a selloff
that traders blamed on the weak dollar and inaction on the U.S. budget
deficit, the same worries that touched off last month's global collapse.
"To get the public back into this market we need some leadership from
Washington," said Hank Streifler, a senior vice president at Shearson
Lehman Brothers, Inc., a large New York investment firm.
"Right now people out there do not feel comfortable."
The widely followed Dow Jones industrial average, which dropped
50.56 points Tuesday and shattered a five-day winning streak, lost another
18.24 points in heavy trading.
Broader market measurements also dipped, and five stocks fell for every
four that rose on the New York Stock Exchange.
soviet paper quotes dissident
MOSCOW - Once branded a criminal by the state-run press, Soviet
human rights activist Andrei Sakharov has appeared in print in his native
country with an impassioned call for truth.
A copy of the Moscow News, obtained yesterday by the Associated
Press, quoted Sakarov as saying: "Speaking the truth is an absolute
necessity."
The interview is the widest exposure ever given the 1975 Nobel Peace
Prize laureate's views by a Soviet publication, and is clearly linked to
the Kremlin's campaign for greater candor on some social issues.
"It's proof of the openness that's taking place," Sakharov, 66, said in a
telephone interview. "In our country now, many things are being pub-
lished that never have been printed before."
Reagan says arms treaty won't
affect U.S. Europe commitment
WASHINGTON - Presiaent meagan vowed yesterday that a nuclear
arms treaty with the Soviet Union will not undercut the U.S.
commitment to the security of Europe, saying that the stationing of
300,000 American troops abroad, and "our steadfast nuclear guarantee
underscore this pledge."
Reagan also said it was "totally unacceptable" for the Soviet Union to
try to link reductions in globe-girdling strategic nuclear weapons
restrictions on his "Star Wars" missile defense plan, also known as SDI.
"We won't bargain away SDI," Reagan said.in a speech a month before
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev arrives in Washington for a superpower
summit. The two leaders are expected to sign a treaty banning
intermediate-range nuclear forces (INF) in Europe and to discuss other
arms differences.
Agents bust Miami drug ring
MIAMI - Federal agents have smashed the nation's largest, most
sophisticated drug transport ring, which used spotter planes, infared
beacons and decoy plane passengers called "cover girls" to avoid detection,
authorities said yesterday.
The miami-based ring was contracted by the Medillin Cartel, the
Colombia-based drug smuggling organization responsible for 80 percent
of U.S. cocaine imports, to haul cocaine from Colombia to the United
States, investigators said.
"This was the largest transportation network used by the Medillin
Cartel between 1982 and 1986," said Bill Perry, acting special agent in
charge of the Miami FBI office. "Essentially this takes the whole
organization out of business."
During that period, the ring hauled 20,000 pounds of cocaine in 19
shipments, in addition to four relatively small marijuana shipments,
officials said.
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Beagle refuses to eat at, home
JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. (AP) - It's no dog's life for Sadie, a part
beagle and part hound that is driven to a store every morning for a
vanilla ice cream cone.
"I used to take her to Mc Donald's sometimes, but they didn't
always have the ice cream machine on," said Sandy Smith. "I didn't
like listening to her cry when we'd pull out of there empty-handed."
Smith cares for the canine while her son, Mark, attends college in
Atlanta. She said the daily trips are necessary because Sadie won't eat
ice cream at home.
"She just likes to get out and go for a ride and get it," Smith said
recently.
Smith, who works at a jewelry store, returns at lunchtime each day
to be with the dog, who dines with the family on people food for all
meals except her nightly snack. It's dog food right before bed, she said.
"When she dies, I'm going to have her stuffed so I can keep her
around," Smith.
If you see news happen, call 76-DAILY.
Clhbe Mirbigan U afl
Vol. XCVIII - No. 41
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$25 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One term: $13 in
Ann Arbor; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and subscribes
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vice.

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Managing Editor.....................................AMY MINDELL
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NEWS STAFF: Elizabeth Atkins, Francie Arenson,
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