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November 04, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, November 4, 1987-Page5
LSA dean returns to teaching
after supervising improvements

Doily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY

Willie Watts smoothes the groundwork for the new side-walks by Angell Hall yesterday. Watts works for
Stoner Desborough, Ind.
University begins Diag renovation
project by adding new walkways

By MICHAEL LUSTIG
James Cather, LSA associate dean
for facilities and administration,
announced last week he will return to
teaching full-time June 30 at the end
of his six-year term. Cather, an
embryology professor, is responsible
for administering $100 million in
improvements to Central Campus
buildings.
The associate dean for facilities is
primarily responsible for the super-
vision of new construction and the
maintenance of office space and
classrooms.
CATHER'S biggest accom-
plishment and biggest dis-
appointment, has been his plans to
refurbish the chemistry department.
The $60 million project includes a
new four-story building adjoining the
existing building and a complete
renovation of the existing building.
Plans for an underground library
which would consolidate the collect-
ions of the natural sciences have
been delayed, Cather said, because of
his "inability to convince the
administration that success on the
sciences is the underground library,
which has been approved but not
funded. It's sort of hanging out in
space."
Money is the root of the problem,
said Keith Molin, University vice
president for communication rela-
tions and director of capital outlays.
"The funding for (the underground
library) has not been identified. I
don't think anybody is happy," he
said.
Cather called the current library a
"pretty ineffective service for students
and faculty." He said there is no place
to study and that because of size
constraints, about 40 percent of the
natural sciences library collection is
in storage. The new library would
consolidate the chemistry, biology,

and geology holdings in one place,
he said.
Cather's also complained about
University administration's "inability
to develop an adequate budget for
equipment for the sciences." During
the recession of the early 1980s,
funding for the University was cut
drastically, and the purchase of new
laboratory equipment was postponed.
Now, Cather said, many departments
lack the up-to-date equipment needed
to teach effectively.
THE SECOND of Cather's
major. improvements is a $10
million renovation of the Natural
Science Building. The funds, which
were approved a year ago, will be
used to modernize the building built
in 1914 because it "doesn't serve the
field as it exists today."
Cather said the reconstruction,
which will take two to three years,
will consist of internal remodeling.
The building is "structurally sound"
and a good one to renovate because
most of the inner walls, except for
hallways, can be torn out. The plans
call for increased lab facilities.
Remodeling the East Engineering
building is the last of Cather's plans.
The $20 million job, which has not
yet been funded, will make "the
inside of the building... a brand new
building." The building's equipment
and utilities are obsolete, Cather said.
Plans call for construction to begin
in about a year.
LSA Dean Peter Steiner said he
would like to -see a professor from a
natural science field, "someone who
will have his or her own ideas," fill
Cather's spot. Steiner is accepting
nominations until November 16.
Steiner said Cather has "done a
fine job" and appreciated Cather

By DAVID SCHWARTZ
As one part of its renovation project, the University
will build new concrete walkways near the corner of
State and North University streets. Other walkways and
driveways around the Diag will also be improved and
new bike racks will be installed.
Because of drainage problems, workers will be
forced to move the driveway of the Kraus Natural
Sciences Building to where the old walkways were
located, said Paul Spradlin, director of the University
Plant Extension Service. "(The driveway) is totally
rutted and has to be totally realigned," he said.
University Planner Fred Mayer said with the

improvements, "there is an overall upgrading of the
walks in the Diag to make them where people want to
walk," he said. Mayer noted that pedestrians often took
shortcuts on the grassy areas between the old
walkways,
Many of the improvements are also needed to make
existing walkways in the Diag more accessible to
handicapped students. "There is currently a lot of
broken concrete, making it hard for handicapped
students to get around," Spradlin said.
The improvements are expected to be completed
before winter, barring unusually cold weather, Mayer
said.

Cather
... to return to teaching
staying on for an additional three
years as associate dean to finish the
plans he began.
"I've really enjoyed working with
the dean, associate deans, and staff...
they're really dedicated to the
improvement of the college," Cather
said.
Read
W~e
Cla'ied r
-i d

U.

Rule to ban 'passing up'

EM Burnham.

(Continued from Page 1)
That resolution, unlike the
ordinance, was opposed by council
Republicans because they said co-
authors DeVarti, Ann Marie
Coleman (D-First Ward), and Jeff
Epton (D-Third Ward) had not
contacted the University before
making the proposal.
"None of us opposed the
resolution on principle," Jernigan
said.

LastnFriday, DeVarti and
Coleman met with several
University and student officials, and
wrote the ordinance based on its
findings.
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