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October 30, 1987 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-30

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 30, 1987- Page 5

Ghouls, ghosts and
goblins to haunt U'

Sorority hosts Halloween bash
for underprivileged children

By JEFF HUGHES
They're back...
This weekend, ghosts and
ghouls, bats and banshees, and all
manners of spirits will make their
annual appearance in the scariest
holiday of the year - Halloween.
University students a r e
celebrating the holiday by planning a
variety of activities. Jack-O-Lanterns,
for instance, were bobbing all around
campus during two pumpkin sales.
LSA sophomore Angela
Fanzoni, who ran a sale at the
Stockwell residence hall, said she
sold around $200 worth of
pumpkins. Out of a stash of 350
pumpkins, the unsold 150 are being
sent to decorate rooms in Mott
. Children's Hospital.
The annual sale, Fanzoni said,
encouraged residents to get into the
Halloween spirit. "We needed
Stockwell to be known a little bit,"
Fanzoni said.
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity and
Chi Omega sorority joined forces to
sell pumpkins for a dollar apiece at
the Fishbowl and the Michigan
Union, donating the proceeds to the
National Institute of Burn Medicine.

Last year's sale made around $900,
and Phi Gamma Delta member Doug
Bartman, an LSA junior, said he
hopes this sale will earn about
$1,000.
LSA sophomore Gary Rudnick,
a member of Phi Gamma Delta, said
the sales have gone well. "It's not
too tough for someone to find a
dollar," he said.
Residents and staff in East Quad
are hosting their annual "Halloween
Thing" this weekend, a tradition in
the dormitory. Barry MacDougall,
Residential College senior and a
resident director in East Quad,
expects attendance to reach 500 or
600. The "Thing" includes a dance
with live bands, a Horror Flick
Marathon, and a haunted house.
Some students, however, will
stick to traditions of their younger
days, dressing up as their favorite
goblins to hit the streets in search of
goodies. Libby Tannenbaum, an
LSA sophomore, said she and her
friends want to trick-or-treat as Snow
White and the Seven Dwarves.
"I love to pass out candy,"
Tannenbaum said, "but I always got
sick from all the candy I ate."

By RACHEL STOCK
Kids beamed and giggled as
members of the Pi Beta Phi sorority
carefully painted hearts, whiskers,
and mustaches on their faces. Then
the kids did the same for their hosts
- but a little sloppier.
The hosts, some from the sorority
and others from Beta Theta Pi
fraternity, then took the children
trick-or-treating through the sorority
house decorated with balloons, black
and orange streamers, and pictures of
Jack-O-Lanterns.
"Pi Phi" hosted their second
annual Halloween party last night for
children of Hikone, a low-income
housing community in Ann Arbor.
About 40 children and seven
mothers from Hikone and other low-
income housing areas came to the
party, which provided the children a
safe environment for trick-or-treating.

Carmen Rivera, a parent of one of
the children, said that the party was,
"Really neat. I feel it's better for my
child. I don't have to worry about the
candy" being drugged.
Pi Phi Philanthropy Chair Debbie
Wittlin, who volunteered as a tutor at
Hikone two years ago, came up with
the idea to host children of low-
income housing.
The sorority's philanthropy com-
mittee planned and organized the
event while the rest of the house
volunteered to drive the children to
the house, buy candy, decorate their
rooms, and distribute Halloween
treats. Members of Beta Theta Pi

fraternity helped with transportation
and celebration.
Hikone, a city-owned public
housing community, provides
supportive services for low-income
families. Sharon Selby, program
director at Family Support Systems,
which is centered at Hikone, said the
party was good because "They (the
children) don't get to go many places
because we don't have any way to
transport them."
Five-year-old Hikone resident
Demetrisa Anderson enjoyed the
party, saying that her favorite things
w e r e." I t ' s spooky.
..ghosts...candy...costumes."

Pi Beta sorority member Sue Stefan
paints the face of a child at last
night's Halloween party.

WARNER-LAMBERT/UNITED WAY
FUND RUN
10K race or 2mi fun run or walk
Saturday, November 7, 1987 at 9:00 am

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The Office Of Major Events,
Presents
PAUL
WINTER
CONSORT

LOCATION:

'Funeral'
o poses C
(Contirmed from Page 1)
and vote 'no' on Contra aid," sa
Phillis Engelbert, a Natural R
sources graduate student and a mer
ber of the Latin American Solidar
Committee, at the rally.
The event was sponsored
LASC, the Ann Arbor Central Ar
erica Sister City Task Force a
Faculty for Human Rights in Centi
America.
In a telephone interview, Purs
spokesperson Gary Cates refused
respond to the protest: "There is
proposal currently on the table I
Contra aid. I think that the issue
really a moot point and to discuss
at this point is really counte
productive," he said.
After the rally, protesters march
down State Street to Pursell's A
Arbor office near Briarwood Ma
They carried coffins and cross
which bore the names of peop
p killed by the Contras.
They then held a eulogy, layi
the coffins on a grassy hill in fro
of Pursell's office and sticking t
crosses in the ground around it. O
of the participants wore a Gri
Reaper costume and carried a scyt
that said "Contra Aid."
Rev. Dan Coleman from 1
Guild House in Ann Arbor said at t
Neulogy, "Reagan is asking for me
I money. I have little doubt that C0
Pursell will vote in favor of ti
proposal. Carl Pursell, have you
shame?"
Cynthia Hudgins, a Pursell ait
spoke to demonstrators outside t
office. She said, "In all honesty
think he has continued to say that
doesn't in any way want to jeopard
the peace plan, but at this time
has not decided on whether or r.
there should be more Contra aid."
The day's events were marked
neither arrests nor injuries. Fc
police vehicles escorted the march

procession
ontra aid
aid "to make sure no one in this group
e- gets hurt," said one Ann Arbor police
m- officer.
ity "There's people who don't have
the same philosophy as these people,
by and we want to make sure nothing
m- happens," he said.

Wamer-Lambert/Parke-Davis facility at 2800
Plymouth Rd. across from the Plymouth Mall,
bordering North Campus.

CHECK-IN: Race day 7:30-8:30 am.

COURSE:
T-SHIRTS:
REGISTRATION:

10K; includes scenic loop through Gallup Park
and Huron River area. 2mi; on Warner-Lambert
grounds on North Campus.
Long-sleeve, heavy weight T-shirts
guaranteed to all pre-registrants
Preregistration by Saturday, October 31.
$10.00 (nonrefundable), $6.00 without T-shirt

Charge by Phone 763-TKTS
Tickets available at the
Michigan Union Ticket Office
and all
outlets.

Sunday,
November 8
7:30 p.m.
Power Center

PICK UP ENTRY FORMS AT 01 : Michigan BWii

N N 9 5

OUR FINANCIAL ANALYST PROGRAM:
More than a learning experience
PRESENTATION
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2
at 4:30 p.m.
Kresge 1320
at the Business School
Reception immediately following-
Executive Lounge
We invite all University of Michigan Seniors
to get to know the people and
Finance opportunities available
at Salomon Brothers.

CAM PUS'
R COORS
N 114 Barrel
- $19.95
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OFER EXIRES 11/27
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2AM FRI& SAT
HI-FI STUDIO
ANN ARBOR RADIO & TV
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PROFESSIONAL AUDIO -VIDEO
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