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October 30, 1987 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

e Michigan Daily-Friday, October 30, 1987- Page 3
Group seeks to educate
students about code

4

By ALYSSA LUSTIGMAN
Just a few of years ago, most
students knew what the slogan "No
Code" meant. But since the debate
shifted from the Diag to the internal
hagglings of the University
committee assigned to hammer out,
a compromise, some student leaders
fear many students are now unaware
of the issue.
As a result, members of the
Student Rights Committee, a
branch of the Michigan Student
Assembly that is involved with
fighting the code, have been
visiting residence halls this month
to educate house councils about the
code issue.
"We're trying to educate people
about the code, so if something
occurs, people will have a general
idea of what is going on," said Julie
Murray, vice chair of the
committee. "We speak of what the
code is, and try to get student
feedback." In addition to speaking at
each University residence hall, SRC
members plan to visit sororities,
fraternities, and cooperatives.
The debate has revolved around
whether the University should
implement a set of guidelines to
govern the non-academic behavior

of students, faculty, and staff.
Students have opposed the "code,"
saying it would violate civil rights,
but have feared that the ad-
ministration would pass a code
without their approval.
"We start with the dorms first,
because many freshman don't know
what the code is," Murray added.
She said students seem to support
the code more this year because
they feel it would help fight racism
and sexual assault.
The dormitory visits have
sparked a great deal of debate. Chip
Yeager, vice president of the
Mosher-Jordan House Council said
that, while "interest was high,"
some have complained that the
SRC representatives are presenting
a biased view of the code. "We got
very well informed on one side, but

we didn't really get the reasons
why," Yeager added.
"When we go in to speak to the
councils, we give them a picture of
the issue, and even if it is biased, it
gives them something to think
about," said Murray. Debates about
the code, she added, show that
people are thinking about the issue.
Many of the residence halls are
interested in setting up a forum
with one side supporting the code
and one side, represented by the
SRC, against it. "Everyone has
heard 'no code', but very few people
have heard the other side," said
Fouzia Kiani, president of the
Residence Halls Association.
Murray said that SRC would be
glad to debate the issue, but "no
one will take the pro-code side."

Dolly Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY'I

Constitutional discrimination
University Law Professor Christine Whitman speaks on the issue of gender discrimination in the constitution
yesterday in the LSA building.

Division Street ftre kills Ann Arbor man

By JEFF HUGHES
A malfunctioning electric space
heater is believed to have caused a
fire at 732 South Division St. that
killed an Ann Arbor man yesterday
morning, a fire official said.
The victim, identified as Duane
Morhs, was found dead at the scene
of the fire, said Ann Arbor Fire
Marshall Wesley Prater. "There was
no attempt. at mouth-to-mouth or
CPR," Prater said.
. Morhs was taken directly to
University Medical Center, where
smoke inhalation was determined to
be the cause of death, said Toni
Shears, a public information officer
for the medical center.
. Susi Martin, senior secretary for
the Ann Arbor Fire Department, said

that five rescue vehicles responded to
the 7:09 a.m call. Martin, reading
from a fire report, said that the blaze
was "completely extinguished" by
7:29 a.m. Estimates on damages
were unavailable.
Morhs was found in the second
story bathroom of the home, where
the blaze is believed to have started.
Firefighters observed smoke coming
from a window in the second story of
the home.
No injuries were sustained in
putting out the fire, but firefighters
had difficulties in entering the home.
Both the front and side doors were
blocked by piles of old newspapers
four to five feet high. Martin said old
newspapers - some stacks reaching
several feet high - were found

throughout the home. him. I'd never even seen him," said
Ashley Pratt, an LSA junior.
Firefighters finally gained entrance "I know his parents live close, and
by climbing though a window at the would come over sometimes. But
front of the house, Martin said.- otherwise hardly anyone came over,"
Most of the neighboring residents said Ray Williams, a neighbor of
are University students with limited twelve years. "He was cheerful the
contact with Morhs. "I didn't know last time I talked to him."
" ELECTIONS ELECTIONS " ELECTIONS ELECTIONS ELECTIONS e
NOV. 18-19 " NOV.18-19 " NOV.-18-19 " NOV. 18-19'" NOV. 18-19 " NOV.18-19
" ELECTIONS ELECTIONS ELECTIONS ELECTIONS ELECTIONS."
YID _.. ... "" ----- .... . .Th .
NOV.18.196 NOV. 18-19 *.NOV. 18-19 NOV. 18-19'"NOV. 18-19 NOV. 1819
" ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS."
EINVOLVED

Medical School prof.
receives Kellogg grant

By LISA POLLAK
Not all the research projects done
at the University's Medical Center
are hard to pronounce, computerized,
or focused on the intricate biological
functions of furry lab animals.
In fact, the W.K. Kellogg
Foundation of Battle Creek last
month awarded over $300,000 to an
associate professor in the Department
of Internal Medicine to improve the
little white information sheet that we
fill out at the doctor's office.
WWJhost
fired from
on-air post
(Continued from Page 1)
not have had "the stomach for what
Mark does." Kernan described Scott's
style on the radio as "outrageous."
"Mark Scott has always achieved
any level of notariety by being
outrageous," he said.
Kernan said WWJ brought Scott
to the station to attract his listeners,
but later decided it didn't want the
disc jockey's outrageous broadcast
style.
"They bought a package plan but
didn't want part of the package,"
Kernan said. "(WWJ) might have
checked elsewhere for a less
outrageous talk show host."
Archer said Scott will continue to
work for WWJ in a yet undecided
position until his one-year contract
expires. Scott had done only eight
shows before he was taken off the
air.
AATARI
COMMODORE
r IBM COMPATIBLE

The research "will enhance the
development of effective health risk
assessment skills in physicians and
dentists," a University Hospitals
spokesperson said.
But Dr. James Woolliscroft, the
project's prinicipal investigator, ex-
plained yesterday that he is actually
reorganizing the traditional method of
recording a patient's medical history,
so that doctors and dentists can more
easily use the information.
Patients shouldn't worry, however
- the information sheet won't be
any harder to fill out.
"We're just reorganizing it,"
Woolliscroft said. "So that the
patient's genetic and other risk
factors are explicitly presented in one
cohesive section, with another
section for their social history."
Studies show that physicians and
dentists often pay little attention to
these charts, Woolliscroft added, and
ignore the patient's risk of cancer and
other potentially preventable
diseases.

NOV. i8-1
I t
LSA ~ -- - - -- --_-- - -
" Appropriates money to student organizations
" * Appoints students to student-faculty committees
Monitors the school from a student's viewpoint

-1

First Annual
GRADUATE
SCHOOL DAY
TALK WITH REPRESENTATIVES FROM A
WIDE VARIETY OF GRADUATE &
PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS FROM TOP
U.S. COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES
LEARN ABOUT APPLICATION
PROCEDURES & NECESSARY
QUALIFICATIONS
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1987
10:00 am-4:00 pm-
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
SPONSORED BY:
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
A UNIT OF STUDENT SERVICES
Whatothiermeal
cn sustano y ou
Smtmswhat we need most in life is nt more physical nourishment, but spiritual nourishment.
Coejoin us in the weekly celebration of Holy Euchaist in The Episcopal Church.
The Episcopal Church
z--

EPBSCOPAL 3 N
Ann Arbor, Michigan u Q-
CSdcRCad 48104
-- Sunday Schedule -

- -- -

I

I

* Applications available Thursday, Oct. 22-Friday, Nov.6,
4003 Mich. Union, 763-4799
* Candidates Mass Meeting, Nov. 6 *_ ____

1

NOV. 18-19'+ NOV. 18-196" NOV. 18-190" NOV. 18-190" NOV. 18-19 " NOV. 18-19
+ ELECTIONS ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS."
&&~*
NOV. 18-196" NOV. 18-19'" NOV. 18-190" NOV. 18-19'" NOV. 18-196" NOV. 18-19
+ ELECTIONS " ELECTIONS " ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS " ELECTIONS.'
NOV. 18-19'" NOV. 18-19 " NOV. 18-19 e NOV. 18-19 i NOV. 18-196" NOV. 18-19

.What happens
when te worl
of high finance
A world of high success develops.
Merrill Lynch is looking for candidates
with majors in Business, Liberal Arts and
Technical Subjects to jon our
Corporate Systems Program
We Will Be On Campus
To Hold Information Sessions
November 11, 1987, 4:30 to 6:30 pm.
Paton Accounting Center, Room 1016
. . 1 1 1

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