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October 29, 1987 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-29

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4

Men's Lacrosse
vs. Albion
Tomorrow, 7:30 p.m.
Tartan Turf

SPORTS

H~o ckey
vs. Illinois-Chicago
Tomorrow and Saturday, 7:30
Yost Ice Arena

p.m.

s
a

The Michigan Daily
Brown is a

Thursday, October 29, 1987

Page 8

whirlwind on ice

By JULIE HOLLMAN
Rob Brown is like an overloaded
fuse ready to blow, or an unsteady
bottle of nitroglycerin on the verge
of detonation. All three possess an
intense amount of energy with the
potential to burst.
Brown, however, a 5-8 center on
the Michigan hockey team, has
channelled that energy into success
on the hockey rink and in the
classroom.
Last Friday, for example, the
sophomore propelled the Wolverines
to a 5-3 victory over Ohio State
with two goals and two assists. He
added another two goals the
following night in the team's 6-3
loss.
BUT IT'S not only burning
energy that makes Brown a strong
hockey player, he also maintains
intense work habits that overflow
with direction and determination.
"Brown is a hard working player,"
said head coach Red Berenson. "His
work ethic is his biggest strength.
He'll outhustle and outwork other
players."
Brown's dedication and desire
comes from the pressure he puts on
himself, pressure to improve his
skills and his mind.

Center works at sueccr s

"He expects a lot of himself,"
Berenson said. "He wants to do well
and it shows in the way he plays.
But the thing that impresses m e
most about Brown is he keeps
hockey in perspective with school.
He has such a good work ethic that
he does well in both. He's an
achiever."
Brown has worked hard on his
wrist shot and concentration for
hockey, and his school work for the
future. He hopes the attention he's
given to academics will pay off
when he applies to the Business
school at the end of this term.
UNLIKE S O M E college
players, Brown has not set his sites
on a professional career. Since he
lacks the height of the average pro,
Brown regards his chances to sign an
NHL contract as slim. So instead, he
aspires to join a large business firm
on the East coast working as a stock
broker or in finance.
The attitude toward hard work that
Brown displays also works as an
example to his teammates. "Rob
always gives 110 percent on every

shift in every game," said Zaromate
Mike Moes. "He may not have as
good a night as others but he's
always inspiring. He's like a spark
plug. He generates a lot of desire on
the ice and he gets other guys going
with his enthusiam and work
ethics. "
Not only do his teammates look
up to him, they also find themselves
looking for him. Brown is a bundle
of perpetual movement and undying
energy both on the ice and off.
Trying to keep and eye on Brown
can prove to be an exhausting task.
"Rob does everything one gear
higher than anyone else. He's so
wound up you get dizzy watching
him," said goalie Warren Sharples.
"Last year we said we should get
speed bumps in the dressing room
because he's always running
around.,
"ROB KEEPS you on your
toes," added Moes. "You never know
what he's doing from one moment
to the other. Y ou can't doze off
when he's around"
Brown's propensity toward

incessant movement fits right in
with the chary, teristics and demands
a center.
hr1,s mi { of the
action and making decisions with the
puck," he said "I also like thW peed
involved with playing center."
Coach Berenson enjoys using
Brown for penalty killing because of
his hustle and second-effort type
play. This is fortunate for Brown
since penalty killing is his favorite
part of the game.
"I like being in the short-hand
situation because of the challenge,"
said Brown. "The other team is out
there just to score a goal and its fun
to prevent them and I like flying
around trying to clear the puck from
our zone."
Considering his continuous state
of unrest, onehmight think that
Brown tears through life with
abandon. On the contrary, he just
tries to do everything he can to get
the most out of life and experience
as much as he can in a day.
"I'm always going, going,
going," said Brown. "I've got so
much energy it never seems to run
out. I'm always doing something."

Doily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Sophomore center Rob Brown is off to a strong start for the Wolverines with
four goals and two assists. Brown attributes his success. to a hard work ethic.

2

Adversity-

Women's Soccer Club weathers storm;
grows competitive despite low status

Kickers lose
In its last game of the season
the Michigan women's soccer club-
lost to nationally-ranked division
II, Schoolcraft College, 1-0,
yesterday at Mitchell Field. The
club's record is 7-8-5.
Despite the loss, Michigan
received strong defense from Leslie
Fielding, Jessica Rizzolo, and
Elissa Sard.

By PETER ZELLEN
It's 35 degrees outside with a 15 mile per
hour wind whipping about. It's the kind of
weather that keeps most people indoors, but
not the Michigan women's soccer club.
Despite horrible weather conditions,
midterms, and other assorted maladies, this
club can be seen 18 members strong almost
daily at Mitchell Field playing intra-squad
games.
"I think it's our determination and desire to
play that keeps us going," said sophomore
halfback Kris Fox.
SOCCER IS a club sport, not varsity,
so everything these women do is for their own
pleasure and at their own cost. Their
persistence, however, may change that. Soccer
is a contender for the next varsity team at
Michigan and the players have been lobbying

hard.
"The biggest problem is that we have a
small audience," said second-year coach Robert
Paul. "We try to generate interest in the club."
Paul hopes that people pay attention when
Michigan hosts the Big Ten soccer
tournament this Saturday at Mitchell Field,
where at least six schools will participate. At
last year's tourney, the Wolverines finished
second to Minnesota.
THE CLUB IS highly competitive with
other varsity teams (eight Big Ten teams are
varsity) but must maintain the program on an
$800 per year budget. The men's soccer club
gets $1500.
The women feel that this discrepancy is
unfair but have worked hard to keep the team
above water. The club has frequently held
bottle and can dr;.isq and has even gone door

to door selling Domino's pizza coupons.
The Michigan club has been in existance
for eight years now but has been playing
competitively for the last four.
TWO YEARS AGO, before Paul, a
noted high school coach, arrived, the
Wolverines had a 2-11 record. He brought
them to respectability with a .500 record in
his first year. The 1987 squad has a 7-8-5
record after losing to Schoolcraft College
yesterday.
"I'm very impressed with the freshman,"
Paul said. The team has three that were all-
state in high school: Leslie Martin, Heather
Lawler (both Michigan natives), and Crista
Towne.
The major offensive star for the team has
been sophomore Amy Stock, she leads the
team with five goals. On defense, junior

Tasha Westland has been key at goalie. "Tasha
has been an outstanding keeper for us," said
Paul. "She's done a great job."
The club seems to have a bright future in
the event that it turns varsity. Sixty to 70
people tried out for the team last spring and
coach Paul hopes to do some heavy recruiting.
"We'll be looking for speed next spring
because we haven't been able to capitalize on
the fast break," Paul said, "by r< -jy, the
thing that's kept us going is tie, poitive
attitude of the players. That's the k to 1h1
team."
In the meantime, the players just keep
hitting the field in hopes of earning varsity
status. This team has wanted that for a long
time and the women want to play. Their work
ethic proves it.

\

SKI WEEKEND 101
at CRYSTAL MOUNTAIN

Only Griddes can save Bo now

In what is being described as an
unlikely accident, Bo Schembechler,
coach of the Michigan football team,
fell into a hole eight inches in
diameter to a depth of 22 feet during
yesterday's practice on the auxiliary
field.
A team spokesman who wishes
to remain unidentified said, "One
second he was instructing the
defensive line, next thing I know
he's not there anymore. It was like
Alice in Wonderland."
Rescuers have assured the press
that Bo is conscious and in good
spirits. When asked if he needed

anything to add to his comfort
Schembechler replied, "Gimme a
copy of Griddes."
To play Griddes bring your picks
to the Student Publications Building
by 5 p.m. Friday. This week's
winner will receive a $10 coupon for
Domino's Pizza.
1. Northwestern at MICHIGAN
(pick total points)
2. Michigan State at Ohio State
3. Wisconsin at Purdue
4. Minnesota at Illinois
5. Indiana at Iowa
6. LSU at Mississippi

7. Florida at Auburn
8. Tennesse at Boston College
9. UCLA at Arizona State
10. Alabama at Miss St.
11. Clemson at Wake Forest
12. Notre Dame at Navy
13. Penn St. at West Virginia
14. Syracuse at Pittsburgh
15. Nebraska at Missouri
16. Wyoming at UTEP
17. Arkansa at Houston
18. Princeton at Harvard
19. Columbia at Bucknell
20. Bloomsburg at SLIPPERY
ROCK
I he m n ri
OFF ALL DINNERS I
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Major credit cards accepted.
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(formerly Jo Jo's, Next to vic Tanny)
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with lighted night trail,
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Group rates apply with 20
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Packages with meals, from
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II The University of Michigan
SCHOOL OF MUSIC

-.
tj!

Thursday,
Oct. 29
Friday,

Jelinek-Gurt Duo-
Jerome Jelinek, cello, Joseph Gurt,
piano, assisted by Jacob Krachmalnick,
violin.
Program includes works by Beethoven,
Chopin, and Brahms.
School of Music Recital Hall, 4:00 p.m. Free.
HALLOWEEN CONCERT:

Monday- Friday
8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
WestQuad

Y~

i

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