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October 26, 1987 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Women
students
discuss 'U',
strateg es
By VICKI BAUER
A group of 54 women from
various campus groups met Saturday
and envisioned an ideal situation for
women at the University. At the end
of the five hour conference in the
business school, the woman's group
! SWING (Students Women Initiative
Group) was established.
The participants included under-
graduate, graduate, and law students,
many of whom are already active in
campus organizations. SWING coor-
dinators targeted the invitees to re-
flect the different groups on campus,
such as the United Coalition Against
Racism, Michigan Student Assem-
bly, and sororities.
"We want power in numbers,"
said LSA senior Ana Goshko, one of
SWING's coordinators. "We recog-
nize that women have differences
such as race and religion, but we
want to try and break down the
different barriers and work together as
women."
After discussing women's needs
and concerns at the University, the
group set to work creating a manag-
eable agenda. A steering committee
and five task forces were formed.
The women devised the task
forces by "futuring" - a discussion
technique by which they visualized
an ideal enviornment for women at
the University. They compared their
utopia with the realities they face and
discussed tactics for change.
"I think futuring was a con-
structive way of getting us to think
about what we want," said Shelly
Ebbert, resident director of Barber and
Newberry residence halls. "It wasn't a
slam session, but a visualization
session. It's very easy to criticize
things, but we had a more positive
focus."
The establishment of a "woman's
center," a place women students can
go to for support, counseling, or
medical treatment, was voted as a top
priority by SWING.

Former
o f ew
By JEFF HUGHES
Cat Stevens - a very different
person from the singer who produced
the hits Peace Train, Lady D'arban-
ville, and Moon Shadow - told 300
people yesterday at Rackham Audi-
torium about his new religion,
Islam.
Stevens, now Yusuf Islam,
became a Muslim in 1977, giving
up his musical career and the fame it
brought him to follow the teachings
of the Koran, the holy book of
Islam.
Students and non-students alike
came to hear the former pop-star tell
why he chose to "embrace Islam,"
and reject his music career.
"Certain lyrics I could still
support," replied Islam when asked
about his past works. "A lot of the
things I wrote, perhaps, could be
hints towards the path which I was
taking... As far as rejecting certain
songs, yes, I'd reject them."
At one point during his speech,
he even half-jokingly urged his
audience to "burn the records."

The Michigan Daily-Monday, October 26, 1987- Page 3
singer speaks
lie as Muslim

question of whether he would return
to singing.
"I believe by getting out of the
music business, I was doing the best
thing... There might be hope for me
someday to just do something, to be
more involved. I don't believe in
staying away forever. I just believe
there comes a time when one has to
accept priorities."
Islam also answered questions on
the war between Iran and Iraq which
has waged for the past seven years.
"There are certain things which cre-
ated conditions for Iran to respond...
but it says in the Koran, when you
are offered peace, accept it. And
that's where I think things have
gone too far."
Islam also spoke Saturday night
to an all-Muslim audience on the
importance of proper education for
Muslim children. He is currently
very involved in educational efforts

for Muslim children. He helped
establish the first state supported
Muslim school in London.
Many students came simply to
see Cat Stevens. Others, such as
recent LSA graduate Regina South,
wanted to hear about the Islamic
religion from someone they had
known before and who might pro-
vide a different view.
"He has a lot of similarities to
Americans here... He changed. I
think a lot of people are curious to
know why. It's good for American
people to hear what he can say," said
Norheiza Nordin, an engineering
junior. Nordin is a member of the
Muslim Student Association, the
group responsible for bringing the
60's singer to the Ann Arbor.
Stevens discovered Islam after he
battled tuberculosis in 1976 when
his brother showed him a copy of
the Koran.

Daily Photo by KAREN HANDELMAN
Tina Makim performs "Ramayana," a Puja dance, at the Diwali
Festival in the East Quad auditorium Saturday night to celebrate the In-
dian New Year.
IASA rings in new year
sring Thev also hold parties and a

I

(Continued from Page 1)
student, said, "It was really exciting
for me because this is the first time
I've done this kind of a dance or even
celebrated Diwali." Meanwhile, her
younger sister Ritu, age 7, wearing a
sari like her mother, imitated the
dances as her family sat eating tra-
ditional Indian foods after the show.
About 200 people attended the
program, said Sharma. Many were
parents and friends of the organiza-
tion's members. They sang along
when the Indian national anthem was
played at the end.
Many students went home last
weekend to celebrate, said Sharma.
The organization holds a mem-
bership drive every term and sends
newsletters to Indian students at the
University. They celebrate Diwali,
the Festival of Lights, in the fall and
Holi, the Festival of Colors, in the

semi-formal dance.

He left somewhat open

the

Correction
The Situations Wanted classified ad running in the 10/20/87
paper should have read "BUMPED FROM AIRLINE?
We'll pay cash for your coupon. NORTHWEST $225.00."
The Daily apologizes for any confusion caused by the
incorrect wording of the ad.

I

TUESDAY LUNCH FORUM
at the
INTERNATIONAL CENTER - 603 E. MADISON
October 27at 12noon: "An American
In China"
Speaker: Paul Krieger, Ecumenical Campus
Center Resident
for additional in formation - please call 662-5529

Sponsored by:
The Ecumenical Campus Center
and the International Center

Lunch Available:
$1.00 (students)
$1.50 (others)

|Cornerstone

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I

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I

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G

CHRISTIAN

FELLOWSHIP

EATEIS
COMMON
CALL MARK STEPHENS
AT 763-9484
The University of Michigan is an
equal opportunity, non-discriminatory,
affirmative action employer.

$4/hr with advancements to higher
paying student manager positions
Benefits include
- Flexible hours
- No weekends!
- Close by 5:00-no evenings!
10% off textbooks and selected items at the
Michigan Union Bookstore
- 50% off food the days you work
- Free passes to most University Club events

.\

Students Dedicated to
Knowing and
Communicating
Jesus Christ!

Pastor Mike Caulk
Diag Evangelist
Tuesdays
7 p.m.
2231 Angell Hall
971-9150

Economists predict recession

WASHINGTON (AP) - In a
development that won't cheer
Republicans hoping to hold onto the
White House next year, many of the
nation's economists are sharply
reducing their 1988 forecasts with
some even predicting a m i 1 d
recession early next year.
Those economists who are not
forecasting an outright recession
believe that economic activity will

be much weaker than they had
expected before the record-shattering
plunge of the stock market on
October 19.
"The future has become much
more uncertain. None of us have
lived through anything like this
before," said Lyle Gramley, a former
member of the Federal Reserve Board
and now chief economist for the
Mortgage Banker Association. "

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THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Meetings
Study Abroad Informational
Meeting - 4-5p.m., 3207
AngellHall.
Christian S c i e n c e
Organizations -, 7:15 p.m.,
Third floor Michigan League.
Free South A f r i c a
Coordinating Committe - 7:30
p.m., 111 W. Engineering.
Asian-American Association
-7 p.m., Trotter House, 1443
Washtenaw.
Circle K - 7 p.m., Room A
Michigan League.
Council of Hispanics for
HIgher Education - 7 p.m.,
Room 1209 Michigan Union.
Speakers
John Baines - Egyptology
Professor, Oxford speaking on
"The Orgins of Kingship in
Ancient Egypt," 3p.m., 3050
Frieze Building.
Arthur Green - Visiting
Professor of Religous Thought
speaking on Jewish mystecism, 8
p.m., MLB AUd. 3.
Kenneth Watters -
Chemistry Professsor, U-
Wisconsin, Inorganic Chemistry
Seminars, "Studies on
Organometallics on Refractory
Oxide Surfaces," 4 p.m. Room
1200.
James March - Business
Professor, Stanford University,
"Learning from Information in
Organizations," 2:30 p.m.,

Furthermore
Noontime Carillion Playing
- all weeks days at Burton
Memorial Tower.
Computing Center Courses
- Microsoft Word, Pt. I 8:30
a.m., 3001 SEB; Macintosh
Basic Skills 9 a.m., 4212 SEB;
Macintosh System Utilities, 1
p.m. 3001 SEB; Lotus 1-2-3,
Part 2, 1 p.m. 3001 SEb;
Computer Network Technology,
Part 3, 7 p.m., White Aud.,
Cooley Bldg.; Monday
Programmers' Seminars, 7 p.m.,
4003 SEB. Call 763-7630 for
registration.
Freedom From Smoking
Clinic - Monday evenings, 7
p.m., Snow Health Center,
Eastern Michigan University.
Pre-Interview, ESL, Inc. - 5
p.m., Room 1013 Dow Bldg.
Career Planning and
Placement Programs -
Developing a Job Search
Network 4:10 p.m., at CP&P;
E.F. Hutton & Co., Inc.
reception,. 6 p.m. Michigan
Union Kuenzel Room.
Evolution and Human
Behavior Program - brown bag
discussion topics, "Quantifying
costs and benefits of modern
human strategies: Is it possible?"
1521 RackhamBldg.
Sexual Assault Awareness
Week - Acquaintance Rape
Workshop: 7 p.m. Union Pond
Room for men asnd women; 8
p.m. Chi Omega Sorotiy for
Greek system members.

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Financial Aid:
A Student .
Response
T OM BUTTS
UofMLobbyist and
Former Undersecretary of Education
during the Carter Administration
discussion of federal financial aid
and tax concerns
organizing meeting
and more
2209
OCTOBER267* pm. MICHIGAN
UNION
sponsored by M.S.A. External Relations Committee

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