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October 23, 1987 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-23
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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MICHELLANY

You deserve a fashion break today

Score points with that sporty

WttKEND/SCOTT UTUCHY
SD T
Dave .Siglin
Ark manager talks about club's history, local club
scene, and Ann Arbor audiences; "they 're great"
INTERVIEW
An Ann Arbor institution, the Ark has been showcasing folk and
other, mostly non-commercial, music for 22 years; Dave Siglin has
been the manager for the past 19. The Ark, now the country's oldest
non-profit music club, moved to its' present Main St. location four
yearas ago. Before the move, the club featured folk music almost
exclusively. They have now expanded to include jazz and other musics.
The 24 member board which oversees the Ark changes often but Siglin
has been a constant. He spoke recently with WEEKEND Editor Alan
Paul.
Daily: Before your move, you were a strictly folk club. Was the
musical expansion an intentional effort?
Siglin: Yes; we definitely wanted to expand. As a matter of fact, we
didn't expand as much as we wanted to. We were going to do comedy and
classical chamber stuff but the exact year we moved Mainstreet Comedy
Showcase opened and Kerrytown Concert House opened up. So we
simply said, well, we've been around a long time. It would be easy for
us to go into these areas and compete. And we could damage them. It
wouldn't damage us as much because we'd have other programming that
would carry us. Let's say we 'lost money on comedy and they lost money
on comedy, we could outlast them because we're established and because
it wouldn't be our main source of income.
But we're a non-profit organization, and part of the reason for the
Ark's existance, which I strongly believe in, is that through
programming, you fill voids. And since they were doing comedy and
chamber music, there no longer was a void in those areas. So it didn't
need filled, so we didn't do it. But the move definitely allowed us to
expand. We do a lot more bluegrass, we do a lot more jazz, we do a lot
more pop type music.
D: Along the lines of filling a void, a lot of the pop/rock/blues bars
have closed recently. Have you considered moving that way?
S: Sometimes you are forced to fill voids you don't really want to....I
think that blues probably would not go very well at the Ark. Famous
blues players do very well at the Ark, but not so famous blues players
don't. They do much better at, say, the Blind Pig. The Pig's had an
ongoing blues program for years.
D: Yes, but if they were to...
S: Close? Well, at one point the Blind Pig stopped doing blues and we
picked it up, and they started it up again and we stopped. It's much harder
for us to do blues. We don't have a standard liquor license which means
only members and their guest can drink...Most people, when they go to
see blues, go where they can sit , have a drink with a friend, and talk. It's
not a show the way a John McCutcheon, Suzanne Vega or soemone like
that is..
D: Do you feel you have an obligation to your club members to bring
them what they want?
See INTERVIEW, Page 17

During the photo sessions for
the cover of this magazine I came
uncomfortably close to a pair of
$140 sunglasses. They were being
modeled by Weekend Co-Editor
Alan Paul. I'm not saying that they
weren't the most bitchin' goggles
this side of the local spot-welder's,
but the lenses were red, and that
made Alan look like his soul had
been overwhelmed by Beelzebub,
lord of the dark regions.
The photo session took place out
in front of the Daily, a scant block
away from Our Lady of the Golden
Arches. McDonald's was running a
promotion: buy a big sandwich, get
a pair of shades for $1.39. That's
less than one percent of the price of
Alan's shades. If you took $140
into McDonald's you could come
out with shades, a Big Mac, and
218 hot apple pies. Or you could
have skipped the pies, and gone into
Pinball Pete's and played 548 video
games. Assuming for the sake of
argument that the average video
game lasts three minutes, that's
over twenty-seven solid hours of
Mat Mania. Or you could have
skipped Pinball Pete's and
purchased the entire Rolling Stones
catalogue from Wazoo.

The $140 shades were a bit nicer
than the McDonald's shades. The
latter had an irritating embossed
moon in the corner of one of the
lenses, announcing their cheapness,
and advertising the mighty corporate
deathburger, but the inventive could
scrape the sucker off with a
thumbnail. The $140 shades also
had a length of string attached,
which prevents them from falling
from the wearer and being stepped
on, which is exactly what happened
to my McDonald's shades.
So I'm out $1.39. Maybe if I
had spent the extra $138.61, I'd still
have an intact pair of shades. Of
course, I couldn't possibly wear
$140 shades, even if they were
given to me. That's just not Daily
style.
This magazine is supposedly all
about Daily style, but in case you
haven't noticed, these aren't our
clothes. They were all loaned to us

by various businesses, who all
fervently hope that your seeing our
fabulous bods in their smashing
threads will result in lemming-like
stampedes to their doorsteps.
I encourage this reaction. I also
fervently hope thatrhordes of
fashion-crazed Daily readers will
charge into The Cat's Meow and
demand the very shirt that I wore,
or, for that matter, charge up to me
and pay me twenty bucks for the
underwear I wore that day. But I'm
concerned about the tacit
misrepresentation that's going on.
These clothes, accessories, jewels,
and baubles may or may not be
nice, depending on your tastes, but
they ain't Daily style.
Many of the students working at
the Daily spend far more time than
they ever wanted to in the Student
Publications Building. As a by-
product, the Daily, like the family
breakfast table, has become a place
where people who know one
another well can no longer bring
themselves to be deeply concerned
about how shocking their
appearance might be. Dailyites
know they are among friends, and
moreover, that these friends know
See LOGIE, Page 17

U
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as

Sports staff clothing:
(from left to right)
1. Rush mock turltle neck sweater,
$22; Kikit wool sweater, $73;
Marithe & Francois Girbaud
corduroy pants, $50; Available at
Bivouac.
2. Nautica cotton sweater, $80;

4f

Br,
N<
M
3.
Av

Fabulous Clothing &

20

109 South Fourth Street " Ann
Hours: Mon-Sat. 10 am-8

OFF THE WALL
If you drink, don't park. Accidents
cause people.
The weather is here, wish you were
beautiful
LS&A students are frustrated
because they know they wasted four
years of their lives obtaining an
unmarketable degree.
(in reply)
BUT AT LEAST WE KNOW
HOW TO LIVE, NOT JUST
WORK.
(in reply)
That's fair. You guys can have the
emotions and us engineers'll take
the jobs.
(in reply)
AT LEAST L S & A
STUDENTS DIDN'T DE-
SIGN THE ZILW A U K E E
BRIDGE.
Womyn loving Womyn!
(in reply)
QUESTION LIBERALISM

SKEICtRAb

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PAIR .OF JEAN; MAO.
OF IM (TATION t*N IIA
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NOW L.OOK W RAT 4APMS WIRE;N WS PUT
41M AROVXs1A IT" St C DEN V.flo #mmc
SYSTrEM:

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SPORTS STAFF (left to right): Sports Editor Scott G. Miller, Reporter Adam Schefter, Associate
Sports Editor Greg Molzon.

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God is dead
-F. Nietzche
Fred is dead
-God
-All Graffiti
Library.

AMb NE. OOKS
JA.zvr AMoi

"I

New Fall Arrivals
of Gently Used
Merchandise
* Clothes
* Accessories
" Books.
* and more!
1149 BROADWAY
(.rossfron Aroger s)
Mon.-F~ri. 10-4 Sal. 10-1

I

(I \

4 n1

The
Toybox

Armadillos to Ostriches, and Puppets too!
407 N. Fifth Avenue (2nd floor, Kerrytown)
Ann Arbor 769-1133

Unlocked

Putumayo brings )
1200 South I

found in the Graduate

_

WEEKEND/OCTOBER 23 1987

PAGE 16

WEEKEND/OCTOBER 23, 1987

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