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October 23, 1987 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-23

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Page 2 -The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 23, 1987

Nobel winner taught at

'U'

(ContnuedfroamPage 1)
were trying to get him, and we were
anxious to have him," said Robben
Fleming, president of the University
during Brodsky's stay.
Prof. John Mersereau, chair of the
Slavic languages department, said,
"I'd always predicted that if he lived
long enough, he'd get it. I'm just
surprised he got it at such a young
age."
At 47, Brodsky is one of the
youngest to win the world's most
prestigious literary prize, worth
about $340,000 and the promise of a

boost in sales of his published
works. His poetry has been
translated into 12 languages.
Brown said, "He was very bitter
about the political authorities who
persecuted him, but he loves
Russia."
Brown described Brodsky's
poetry as, "terribly concerned about
the human condition. He has a very
vivid imagination, and his technique
is splendid. He has a marvelous
command of versification."
Brodsky's poetry is difficult
reading. His verse is intensely

personal addressing the human
concerns of suffering, love, death,
separation, solitude, sin, and
salvation, wrote George Kline,
translator of Brodsky's works, in an
introduction to "Joseph Brodsky:
Selected Works."
Brown still smiles when he
recalls the day he was walking down
North University and saw Brodsky
pointing to his dented car. Brodsky,
who was just learning to drive and
afraid of causing an accident, thought
it was funny that someone else hit
him.
Every seat was filled when
Brodsky read his poetry for the first
time to an excited crowd at Rackham
Auditorium in 1972. He has toured
the nation reading his works to over
40 universities and colleges
including Yale, Harvard, Berkeley,
Cornell, Columbia, and Northwest-
ern.
Brodsky's works have never been
published in the Soviet Union, and
last month they were confiscated

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The LSA Project for Language Research and
Development, the Committee on Foreign Language
Instruction and the Language Laboratory
announce
a Colloquium on
Approaches to Foreign
Language Testing
October 24, 1987
9am-4pm
Hussey Room
Michigan League
SPEAKERS
John Clark, Defense Language Institute
Charles James, University of Wisconsin
Dale Lange, University of Minnesota
Charles Stansfield, Center for Applied Linguistics
Marjorie Tussing, California FL Competency Project

from Ardis's exhibit at the
International Bookfair in Moscow.
But Soviet authorities have recently
returned his works and 30 other
books to be distributed at the fair.
Kline wrote that the apolitical
content of Brodsky's poetry may
have prevented him from winning
political approval in the Soviet
Union.
Since coming to the United
States, Brodsky has written several
essays critical of the Soviet Union.
Academy secretary Sture Allen said
the decision to award Brodsky had
nothing to do with politics.
Brodsky is now a U.S. citizen
living in New York, where he
continues to write poetry and teach.
Mersereau said Brodsky moved in
1981 because he wanted to be near
the literary action on the East Coast
and close to the ocean.
During the fall he teaches at New
York University and at Columbia
University. In the winter, he teaches
at Amherst and Hampshire colleges.
He still visits Ann Arbor; the last
time was three years ago for the
funeral of his friend, Carl Proffer.
Informed that he had won the
honor while eating lunch with
British spy novelist John Le Carre
in a Chinese restaurant in London,
Brodsky said he hoped the award
would draw more people into reading
Russian poetry.
He joked that the prize was a "big
step for me and a small step for
mankind."
-The Associated Press
contributed to this report.

PoIn 6105
Phone 764-0558

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
Iran attacks Kuwaiti oil rig
KUWAIT - An Iranian Silkworm missile hit Kuwait's offshore
supertanker oil terminal yesterday, setting it afire and wounding several
people, officials reported. None of the U.S.-flagged tankers the Navy
protects were in the area.
It was the third Iranian missle attack in a week on the sheikdom
nestled between Iraq and Saudi Arabia at the head of the Persian Gulf.
The Kuwait News Agency quoted officials as saying five people were
wounded and on remained hospitalized. Shipping and diplomatic sources
said casualties were low because no ships were loading at the Sea Island
terminal nine miles offshore and fewer than the usual 20 men were on
duty.
Iranian leaders have threatened retaliation for a U.S. navy artillery
attack Monday that destroyed two of Iran's offshore oil platforms. The
shelling responded to an Iranian missile attack last week that hit one of
the reflagged Kuwaiti tankers near the sheikdom's coastal oil facilities.
CAW, GM reach agreement'
TORONTO - Canadian General Motors Corp. autoworkers were back
on the job yesterday following an Oshawa, Ontario, wildcat strike that
briefly shut down three assembly plants despite a tentative contract
settlement.
The Canadian Auto Workers union and GM of Canada Ltd. reached
tentative agreement late Wednesday on a pact mirroring agreements
reached earlier with the Canadian arms of Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler
Corp.
The settlement includes pension indexing to fight inflation - the
union's top priority - along with an immediate 3 percent wage increase,
25-cent-an-hour increases in the second and third years of the contract and
cost-of-living increases. Workers will vote on it this weekend.
Pro-Iranian group threatens
U.S. naval forces in Gulf
BEIRUT, Lebanon - A pro-Iranian group that holds American and
French hostages said yesterday that "thousands" of suicide bombers are
poised for attacks against U.S. and European naval forces in the Persian
Gulf.
The group, Islamic Jihad, claims to have carried out a series of suicide
bombings against American and French targets in Lebanon in 1983 and
1984. The attacks killed more than 370 people, mostly American and
French servicemen.
The threat was made in a typewritten Arabic statement, copies of
which were delivered to the offices of Western news agencies in Beirut. It
was accompanied by black and white photographs of American hostage
Terry Anderson and French captive Jean-Paul Kauffmann.
Arms talks called productive
MOSCOW - Secretary of State George Shultz and Soviet Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevardnadze "basically resolved" a dispute over West
German nuclear missiles yesterday in talks both sides described as
productive.
The two, holding their third round of negotiations this year, were
trying to settle the last sticking points in a treaty to scrap intermediate-
range nuclear missiles.
But no date was set for a third summit meeting between President
Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, at which such a treaty could
be signed. Soviet spokesman Gerady Gerasimov said the subject never
came up.
Both sides agreed in principle to the missile accord during
Shevardnadze's visit to the United States last month.
EXTRAS
Clandestine cleaner creeps,
sweeps, and does dishes
GILROY, Calif - Instead of being cleaned out, a Gilroy man's
house was cleaned up by a mysterious housekeeper who broke in,
made his bed, took out the trash, washed his dishes and gathered up his
dirty clothes.
The unidentified victim, who told police he is sure last week's
indident was not a practical joke, found a note saying : "Dear Sir, I
hope you don't mind. I cleaned your house. Don't worry, I won't take
anything because my father is a Duke in Spain. Don't worry. I'll clean
your house for as ling as you live here."
The note was signed "Prince Eddie."
Gilroy police commander Vern Gardner said his department is trying

to uncover the mysterious housekeeper.
Besides the cleanup, the person left the front door ajar after
replacing the man's old drapes with new ones.
"We're not exactly sure what we could charge him with," said
Gardner. "It's too bad he didn't break into my house."
If you see news happen, call 76-DAILY.
The M chga wateI.
Vol. XCVIII - No. 32
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$25 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One term: $13
in Ann Arbor; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and sub -
scribes to the Los Angeles Times Syndicate and the National Student,
News Service.

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THE
MUSLIM STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION'
SPEAKER: CAT STEVENS
(YOUSEF ISLAM)
LIVE
PLACE: RACKHAM
AMPHITHEATER
TIME: SUNDAY,
OCTOBER 25, 1987
2:30 P.M.
FREE ADMISSION

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" ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS ELECTIONS ELECTIONS'"
NOV.18.19 " NOV. 18-19 " NOV. 18-19 " NOV. 18-19 " NOV.18-19 " NOV. 18-19
* ELECTIONS ELECTIONS ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS ELECTIONS'-
-i--
NOV. 18-190" NOV. 18-19'" NOV. 18-190" NOV. 18-190" NOV. 18-19 " NOV. 18-19
" ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS * ELECTIONS "

Y p.

One Success Story
After Another.
A
U C ALLSPECIALS
CURICH S FAL P NOW
CHECK OT OURSPECIAL PRICING GOING ONNO

* LSA ----
" Appropriates money to student organizations "
" Appoints students to student-faculty committees
Monitors the school from a student's viewpoint

Editor in Chief......................................ROB EARLE
Managing Editor.............................AMY MINDU.t.
News, Editor ..........................PHILIP I. LEVY
City Editor.................................MELISSA BIRKS
Features Editor...............................MARTIN FRANK
University Editor..........................KERY MURAKAMI
NEWS STAFF: Elizabeth Atkins, Francie Arenson, Vicki
Bauer, Eve Becker, Steve Blonder, Keith Brand, Jim Bray,
Dov Cohen, Hampton Dellinger, Kenneth Dintzer, Nancy
Driscoll, Sheala Durant, Heather Eurich, Stephen Gregory,
Linda Hecht, Grace Hill, Jeff Hughes, Steve Knopper,
Carrie Loranger, Michael Lustig, Alyssa Lustigman. Tom
MacKinnon, Andrew Mills, Peter Orner, Eugene Pak, Lisa
Pollak, Jim Poniewozik, Melissa Ramsdell, Martha
Sevetson, Rachel Stock, Steve Tuch, David Webster, Rose
MaryWummel.
Opinion Page Editors........................PETER MOONEY
HENRY PARK
Assoc. Opinion Page Editor..........CALE SOUTHWORTH
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Muzammil Ahmed, Rosemary
Chinnock, Noah Finkel, Jim Herron, Eric Holt, Josh Levin,
I. Matthew Miller, Mocha, Jeffrey Rutherford, Steve
Semenuk, Tony Sherman, Mark Weisbrot.

Film.......................JOHN SHEA
Theatre .....................AMY KOCH
ARTS STAFF: John Casson, Scott Collins, Robert
Flaggert, rimothy Hut, Brian Jarvinen, Avra Kouffman,
John Logic, Daniel Rosenberg, Mike Rubin, Lauren
Shapiro, Mark Swartz, Marc S. Tans.
Photo Editors...............................SCOTT LITUCHY
ANDI SCHREIBER
PHOTO STAFF: Karen Handelman, Ellen Levy, Robin
Lozoak, David Lublinmr, Dana Mendclssolm, John Munson,
Can Saffro, Grace Tsai.
Weekend Editors...............REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
ALANPAUL
CARTOONISTS: Aaron Chassy, Fred Zinn.
Business Manager....................REBECCA LAWRENCE
Sales Manager .................................ANNE KUBEK
Assistant Sales Manager.....................KAREN BROWN
SALES STAFF: Gail Belenson, Sherri Blansky, Julie
Bowers, Valerie Breier, Pam Bullock, Stephanie Burg,
Milton Feld, Kim Feuerstein, Lisa George, Michelle Gill,
Missy Hambrick, Ginger Heyman, Matt Lane, Joi

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"640K RAM exp. to 1MB *EGA,
CGA, MDA and Hercules graphics
emulation with automatic mode swit-

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