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October 21, 1987 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-21

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U

Field Hockey
at Michigan State
Sunday, 2 p.m.

SPORTS
Wednesday, October 21, 1987

Women's Soccer
vs. Indiana
Sunday, 10 p.m.
Mitchell Field

The Michigan Daily

Page 10

0

Mallory family feud has rosy meaning

w

By RICK KAPLAN
Doug Mallory's family all will
be in attendance at this weekend's
Michigan-Indiana football game at
Bloomington. "Hopefully a few of
them will cheer for Michigan," said
the Wolverine safety.
Doug will be on the "wrong" side
of the field on Saturday. His father,
Bill Mallory, is the head football
coach at Indiana, and his brother
Mike is a graduate assistant for the
Hoosiers.
Most of the family, which now
resides in the Bloomington area, will
root for the home team. But Doug is
working on the allegiance of the
youngest of the Mallory clan.
"I bought my year-and-a-half-old
nephew a little Michigan sweat
outfit," Doug said. "Maybe he will
root for us."
THE MICHIGAN defensive
captain roots for his father's team
almost all of the time - except
when the Wolverines play the
Hoosiers. "Personally, I'd like to see
Michigan go to the Rose Bowl,"
Doug said. "But if it turns out we
can't go, there's not another team in
the Big Ten I'd rather see go than
Indiana. But first of all, I'd like to

get back there."
Going to back to Bloomington to
face the Hoosiers is a difficult task
for Doug Mallory. The fifth-year
senior has gone through four games
against his father's squad. "I'm glad
this is the last one," Doug said.
"This one has more meaning than
the ones in the past."
For a change, the Hoosiers are
not only in the Big Ten race, they
are leading it. Indiana is tied with
Michigan State for the conference
lead at 3-0. Michigan, Minnesota,
and Ohio State trail at 2-1.
Doug Mallory is not surprised by
the success Bill Mallory, last
season's Big Ten coach of the year,
is enjoying. "I think he brought in a
good coaching staff," Doug said.
"He's put in a lot of hard work and a
lot of time. He has a lot of good
backing from alumni there.
"I think he's a lot like Bo
(Schembechler). He's had a lot of
dark days since he's been at Indiana,
but it seems like things are turning
around for him."
EVERYTIME he turned around
as a youngster, Doug Mallory's
family was moving. He was born in
Bowling Green, Ohio. Bill Mallory

then led his family aroun the country
while he coached at East Palatine
(Ohio) High School, Bowling Green
State, Yale, Ohio State, Miami of
Ohio, Colorado, and Northern
Illinois.
Doug graduated from high school
in DeKalb, Ill., where he was played
running back and defensive back. He
visited Colorado, Wisconsin, Indiana
("I like the campus and the people
there," Doug said), Northern Illinois,
and Michigan. "It came down to
playing for my father at Northern
Illinois or playing for Michigan,"
Doug said.
Doug chose to join his brother
Mike, an inside linebacker, at Ann
Arbor. Mike Mallory was a four-year
letter winner for the Wolverines and
a two-time All-Big Ten selection.
Mike is now in his second year as a
graduate assistant for the Hoosiers.
"I think he really enjoys it,"
Doug said about his older brother.
"Being around my mom and dad in
Blooomington has been good for
him. What he really enjoys is being
able to watch my little brother
(Curt) play football. Neither of us
had been able to do that." Curt
Mallory is in his fourth year as a

starting linebacker at Bloomington
South High.
"My father never pushed us to
play football," said Doug. "But he
told us, if we were going to go out
there, we had to go out there and
give it our best in whatever we do.
That carried over to football, where
you've got to learn to get by with

what you have."
Bill Mallory has given all he has
to his family and his football team.
"I believe that coaching is like
raising a family," the fourth-year
Indiana coach said. "You've got to
be involved with them to be
effective. I like it when sonmeone
comes in (to my office) to talk about

problems back home, or whatever."
Schembechler likes to talk about
the Mallory family, having coached
Doug's uncle Dave Wright at Miami
of Ohio. According to the Wolverine
coach, none of the Mallory's have
great athletic ability. "None of us are
very good athletes," Doug said, "but
we are tough."

.4

SMU grad Dickerson fed up'
with $682, 000 annual pay

LOS ANGELES (AP) -
Running back Eric Dickerson says
he wants to be traded by the Los
Angeles Rams, if he doesn't
approach the annual pay of pro
football's top quaterbacks.
He says he'd "play great" if he
got a rewritten contract of $1.1
million rising to $1.3 million a
Year. He says he's currently stuck at
about 25th place among pro football
salaries - receiving less than
$700,000 a year through 1989.
"I'm so fed up, my mind just
isn't right. I can't play like that. I'll
start, but I can't see myself carrying

30-35 times. The way I'm thinking
right now I could get hurt. And that
would be ridiculous," Dickerson told
reporters Monday as Ram players
regrouped after the long, costly
players' strike.
"I'd play for $1.1 million," he
said.
He was the NFL rushing leader
three times in his four seasons, and
set the league single-season record of
2,105 yards in 1984.
"I can play better if I'm paid
better. I'm willing to play out this
year, if they'd give me their solemn
oath that they'd get rid of me," he

said.
Dickerson told reporters that the
Rams' vice president-finance, John
Shaw, gave him a take-it-or-leave it
offer last Friday averaging $1
million for four years. Dickerson
wants to leave it.
Dickerson will get $682,000 this
season, the same in 1988 and
$686,000 in base salary for 1989.
He lost more than $85,000 during
the players' strike.
Dickerson said that "like John
Elway and Dan Marino, he is a
"franchise player" and deserves to be
paid accordingly.

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY

Michigan defensive captain Doug Mallory attempts to recover a fumble in last week's 37-10 victory over Iowa.
Mallory will square off against his father, Bill, for the final time this Saturday.
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